The Atlantic

Awesomeness Is Everything

Why encountering vastness makes us more spiritual, generous, and content
Source: Christopher DeLorenzo

In October, Jeff Bezos’s space-flight company, Blue Origin, passed a crucial safety test when it successfully detached a crew capsule from a rocket. In the process, would-be space tourists came one giant leap closer to suborbital selfies. A joyride to 330,000 feet would be, quite literally, awesome.

Research on awe (an emotion related to Edmund Burke’s notion of the sublime, Sigmund Freud’s oceanic feelings, and Abraham Maslow’s peak experiences) reveals both its triggers and its far-out effects. and

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