The Atlantic

Awesomeness Is Everything

Why encountering vastness makes us more spiritual, generous, and content
Source: Christopher DeLorenzo

In October, Jeff Bezos’s space-flight company, Blue Origin, passed a crucial safety test when it successfully detached a crew capsule from a rocket. In the process, would-be space tourists came one giant leap closer to suborbital selfies. A joyride to 330,000 feet would be, quite literally, awesome.

Research on awe (an emotion related to Edmund Burke’s notion of the sublime, Sigmund Freud’s oceanic feelings, and Abraham Maslow’s peak experiences) reveals both its triggers and its far-out effects. and

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic8 min readPolitics
'I Think We Have a Leadership Problem'
Wednesday marked just one month since a 19-year-old man opened fire in a Parkland, Florida, high school and murdered 17 people. One month since Twitter brimmed with thoughts and prayers from some, and renewed calls for gun control from others. And on
The Atlantic8 min readPop Culture
The Decemberists' Shiny, Happy Protest Album
“There’s something therapeutic in looking at the apocalypse and laughing,” Colin Meloy says of the band’s I’ll Be Your Girl.
The Atlantic3 min readPolitics
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: McMaster of Suspense
White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders continued to deny reports that National-Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, among others, will be replaced.