Nautilus

How Your Brain Gaslights You—for Your Own Good

Nailia Schwarz via Shutterstock

Runners can tell you that sometimes the last mile of a run seems to feel dramatically longer than the first. This perceptual distortion isn’t limited to brains addled by exercise—it’s a consistent feature of our minds.  

When we look at the world, it certainly feels like we’re seeing things as they really are, our senses measuring reality in an objective way. But numerous experiments have shown that the way we see the world is influenced by what we can do

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Nautilus

Nautilus3 min readScience
A New View of Time: Introducing the Nautilus Time Project.
This article introduces Nautilus’ month-long exploration of the science and art of time. When Lee Smolin’s book Time Reborn was re-launched to great fanfare at my home in 2015, it accelerated a discussion he and I had been having for years: What if w
Nautilus5 min read
Scavenging Russia’s Rocket Graveyard Is Dangerous and Profitable
The Altai mountain region of Central Asia is a rugged and remote place. Right in the center of the continental landmass, it forms a crossroads between the Kazakh steppes, the snow forests of Siberia and the arid plains of Mongolia. It’s a landscape o
Nautilus4 min readPsychology
Why Social Science Needs Evolutionary Theory
My high school biology teacher, Mr. Whittington, put a framed picture of a primate ancestor in the front of his classroom—a place of reverence. In a deeply religious and conservative community in rural America, this was a radical act. Evolution, amon