The Atlantic

Will Personalized Learning Become the New Normal?

Rhode Island is rolling out a statewide initiative to integrate student-specific instruction into classrooms.
Source: Michaela Rehle / Reuters

Over the last few years, Rhode Island has emerged as a national leader in the drive to put personalized-learning programs into actual classroom practice. Now education leaders in Providence, the state’s capital and most populous city, are looking to scale their early efforts statewide, pushing district leaders to think bigger about pilot programs and technological infrastructure, while also commissioning new research on how an understudied learning model could drive student performance.

The state’s six-month-old, $2 million public-private personalized-learning initiative is capitalizing on the freedom afforded by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)—the nation’s federal education law, which returns significant power to the states—to chart and test how personalized instructional techniques can be delivered to its 140,000 K-12 students. Broadly speaking, personalized learning tailors the instruction, content, pace, and testing to the individual student’s strengths and interests, using technology, data, and continuous feedback to make that customization possible.

The ability for states to more fully explore innovation through technology and curriculum paths separate from traditional reading, writing, and math—rather than following

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic2 min readPolitics
The Voters of Alabama
Portraits from the Yellowhammer state, where Democrat Doug Jones defeated Republican Roy Moore in the special election for Senate on Tuesday
The Atlantic9 min readPolitics
The Making Of An Upset
Everything had to go exactly right for Doug Jones, and exactly wrong for Roy Moore—and it did.
The Atlantic5 min readPolitics
‘If It Doesn’t Work, Blame Us’
Brushing aside attacks from Democrats, GOP negotiators agree on a late change in the tax bill that would reduce the top individual income rate even more than originally planned.