NPR

Think Your Credentials Are Ignored Because You're A Woman? It Could Be.

Dr. Tania Lombrozo reflects on her own experience of being referred to as Mrs., Miss or Ms., rather than her actual title, in light of a new paper studying the topic — with striking results, she says.
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When I first became a professor I was 26. And female. (I'm no longer 26; still female.)

The combination made me anxious about whether students would take me seriously as an authority on the material I was trying to teach. I made a point of introducing myself as "Professor Lombrozo," and I signed e-mails to students the same way — especially those addressed to Miss/Ms./Mrs. Lombrozo, or those that simply used my first name. I bought some collared shirts from Brooks Brothers; I made a point never to wear jeans

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