NPR

315,0000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens

Scientists who found the fossils believe they are the remains of five people and far older than all previous finds. But how do the remains really fit into the bushy family tree of modern humans?
Max Planck Institute paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin examines the new finds at Jebel Irhoud, in Morocco. The eye orbits of a crushed human skull more than 300,000 years old are visible just beyond his fingertip. Source: Shannon McPherron

A team of European and Moroccan scientists has found the fossil remains of five individuals they believe are the most ancient modern humans (Homo sapiens) ever found.

In a remote area of Morocco called Jebel Irhoud, in what was once a cave, the team found a skull, bones, and teeth of five beings who lived about 315,000 years ago. They also found

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