Entrepreneur

An Experimental, Tuition-Free Program Is Teaching Business Lessons Using Hip Hop

Budding entrepreneurs are using lessons from music-industry moguls to learn how to run their own businesses.
Source: Institute for Hip Hop Entrepreneurship

In a modish co-working space overlooking downtown Philadelphia, Imowo “Veli” Udo-Uton has six minutes to persuade six investors to finance his startup.

He has an event production company he wants to take to the next level, and, clad in a baseball cap and black-framed glasses, he outlines his plan -- his ticket sale models, room occupancy caps and the first few big venues he can get with more capital. He tries to keep it animated and conversational. But midway through, he falters.

Related: 6 Tips for Perfecting Your Elevator Pitch

“I feel like I’m talking too much,” he says. “I’m not presenting.”

“Don’t do a corporate ,” says one

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