The Atlantic

Is Any Job Really Better Than No Job?

Being out of work seems to hurt health, but so do jobs that are stressful and unrewarding.
Source: Rick Wilking / Reuters

Any job is better than no job.

Or at least that’s the thinking when it comes to preserving physical and mental health after unemployment. Indeed, have found that the long-term unemployed have at least twice the rate of depression and anxiety, as well as higher rates of heart attacks and strokes. on Pennsylvania men weathering the 1980s recession found that a year after they were laid off,, “nearly all individual-level studies indicated that job loss, financial strain, and housing issues were associated with declines in self-rated health during the Great Recession.”

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