Popular Science

These self-destructing electronics can turn your data to dust on command

A radio signal tells the components to vaporize.

A piece of plastic

A piece of polycarbonate. In a new kind of electronics, this material will vaporize when heated by a chemical reaction.

Cornell University

Engineers have come up with a trick to make electronics disintegrate from far away. The technology represents a new kind of transient electronics, which are designed to disappear when they’re no longer needed. In this case, chemicals

Você está lendo uma amostra, registre-se para ler mais.

Mais de Popular Science

Popular ScienceLeitura de 2 mins
Downtime, USA
THE WORD LEISURE—time that belongs to you, free from work or other duties—dates to 14th-century Europe. But for much of its existence, the term was an abstract concept to all but the wealthy. That began to change in the United States in the late 1800
Popular ScienceLeitura de 12 minsAstronomy & Space Sciences
The Dimmer Switch
ON HARDSCRABBLE PASS in south-central Colorado, bighorn sheep, patches of ice, and blown-over snow regularly threaten drivers on February days. But once they come out the other side and dive down into the Wet Mountain Valley, the first breathtaking g
Popular ScienceLeitura de 1 mins
Why Does Screaming Make You Feel Better?
THE PAST YEAR has provided no end of things to flip out about. The pandemic. The economy. The cabin fever from spending months indoors. Couldn’t you just scream? Go ahead (but try not to scare the neighbors). Turns out shouting from the rooftops—or i