Popular Science

We shouldn't disregard the ideas that come from teens' developing brains

Teens may be works in progress, but they help society evolve.

teens holding protest signs

They're quite aware of what they're going through.

Wikimedia Commons

When the students of Stoneman Douglas High School started class on February 14, it seemed to be a Valentine’s Day like any other. But by 2:30 p.m., it was clear it was a day that would live in infamy. Nikolas Cruz, a 19-year-old who was expelled from Stoneman Douglas last year, killed 17 students and injured 14 more, making it one of the deadliest school shootings in American history.

In the two short weeks since, many of the teenaged survivors have spoken out against violence to national papers and TV news networks, and organized protests and legislative meetings to fight for stricter gun control in the United States. While many have spoken out in support of their to , others have taken issue not just with the survivors’ message—but with the notion they have the right to say anything at all.

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