Chicago Tribune

The looming specter of #MeToo stories turned into fodder for TV and film

It is inevitable that the #MeToo movement will be turned into TV and film. But whose stories are being told? And who gets to tell them?

The answers feel, well, actually kind of predictable for Hollywood.

Last week, the New Yorker published a long and fascinating profile of TV producer Ryan Murphy and in it, he mentioned an idea for an anthology series called "Consent." Each episode would tackle a different storyline, "starting with an insider-y account of the Weinstein Company. There would be an episode about Kevin Spacey, one about an ambiguous he-said-she-said encounter."

Murphy's shows - from "Glee" to "American Horror Story" - are tonally varied, but share what he describes as a "maximalist" approach to storytelling. There is a grandness and an over-the-topness to his style and I'm not sure that aesthetic is suited to the (still) highly contentious topic of sexual violence and workplace

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