NPR

More Screen Time For Teens Linked To ADHD Symptoms

A new study finds that teens who engage in frequent texting, social media use and other online activities daily are more likely to develop symptoms of ADHD.
Source: Peter Dazeley

Most teens today own a smartphone and go online every day, and about a quarter of them use the internet "almost constantly," according to a 2015 report by the Pew Research Center.

Now a study published Tuesday in JAMA suggests that such frequent use of digital media by adolescents might increase their odds of developing symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

"It's one of the first studies to look at modern digital media and ADHD risk," says psychologist Adam Leventhal, an associate professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California and an author of the study.

When considered with previous research showing that greater social media use is in teens, the

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