Fast Company

A FASHIONABLE ENTRANCE

ON THE HEELS OF HIS COMPANY’S RECENT IPO, FARFETCH CEO JOSÉ NEVES TALKS ABOUT THE FUTURE OF FASHION, THE INDUSTRY’S PROBLEM WITH WASTE, AND THE UNEXPECTED BENEFITS OF A GLOBAL RECESSION.

IN SEPTEMBER, A DECADE AFTER HE BEGAN KNITTING TOGETHER an online marketplace for independent boutiques across the globe, Farfetch founder and CEO José Neves took the company public. It’s now worth more than $7 billion and encompasses the original platform (which sells items from more than 980 stores and brands), white-label e-commerce services for designers such as Thom Browne and Derek Lam, and even physical retail.

You launched Farfetch two weeks after Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008. What was it like to debut a company that championed luxury fashion at such a moment?

Starting a company is already scary. Starting a company in the middle of a financial storm was terrifying. There was this fear of Armageddon in the [fashion] industry. And here we were trying to start a very ambitious project: to create a platform for boutiques and

Você está lendo uma amostra, registre-se para ler mais.

Interesses relacionados

Mais de Fast Company

Fast CompanyLeitura de 5 mins
16. For Helping Us Believe Our Eyes
Early one morning in April 2017, a series of horrific photos and videos began hitting Facebook and YouTube showing civilians in a rebel-held area of northern Syria writhing on the ground and gasping for oxygen as deadly sarin-based gas—which witnesse
Fast CompanyLeitura de 1 mins
11. For Incubating Cult Brands In-house
One room is full of sequins and kids’ clothes. Another has lamps and tables, and yet another houses beakers of various dishwashing detergents. This is Target’s Minneapolis-based design lab, where Julie Guggemos, the company’s senior VP of product des
Fast CompanyLeitura de 1 mins
33. For Mobilizing Against Toxins
Direct-to-consumer skincare and cosmetic brand Beauty-counter refuses to use more than 1,500 legal but questionable chemicals in its products, but for founder and CEO Gregg Renfrew, there’s another number that’s even more important: 40,000. That’s ho