The New York Times

Wait, How Did You Get Into College?

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

As a first-generation college student, I was always told that college was a place you had to earn your way into and that once you got there, the playing field was totally equal. I saw the admissions process as a kind of sorting procedure, one based solely on merit.

I bought into that lie big time, which meant I worked my butt off at an underperforming, overcrowded Miami public high school, cramming for advanced placement exams, graduating as valedictorian and becoming the president of almost every school club from the National Honor Society to the Premedical Honor

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