The Guardian

DNA from 200-year-old pipe sheds light on life of enslaved African woman

US archaeologists trace roots of woman to modern-day Sierra Leone as part of ongoing ancestry research
‘As soon as people stepped on those slave ships in Africa ... that identity was lost,’ said the study’s chief archeologist. Pictured: The ‘Raise Up’ statute at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, Alabama. Photograph: Brynn Anderson/AP

Archaeologists used DNA taken from a broken clay pipe stem found in Maryland to build a picture of an enslaved woman who died around 200 years ago and had origins in modern-day Sierra Leone. One researcher called the work “a mind-blower”.

“In this particular context,.

Você está lendo uma amostra, registre-se para ler mais.

Mais de The Guardian

The GuardianLeitura de 4 minsAmerican Government
Kamala’s Way Review: Harris As Symbol Of Hope – And Hard Politics
The president of the United States spent weeks recruiting then inciting a mob to invade Congress and prevent the certification of his opponent’s victory. The intruders killed one police officer and injured more than a dozen, pummeling them with every
The GuardianLeitura de 3 minsDiscrimination & Race Relations
Emicida, A Rapper On A Mission To Recover Brazil's Black History
When the black Brazilian rapper Emicida imagines his country’s whitewashed history, he sees a textbook missing a succession of key pages. In his songs and on stage, the São Paulo-born musician tries to correct that skewed telling, remembering the liv
The GuardianLeitura de 9 minsAmerican Government
‘The Capitol Riot Was Our Chernobyl’: James Comey On Trump, The ‘Pee Tape’ And Clinton’s Emails
As an investigator turned author, James Comey has developed a forensic eye for detail. The colour of the curtains in the Oval Office. The length of Donald Trump’s tie. Something about the US president that the camera often misses. “Donald Trump conve