The Christian Science Monitor

Can a word change make women feel welcome at work? France hopes so.

In the face of a language bound by gender, where job titles are inherently masculine, Danielle Terrien, a Parisian author and poet, has been referring to herself in the feminine form for years.

“I always call myself an auteure or une poète. I always put the ‘e,’ even in my published works,” says Ms. Terrien. “It sounds just as nice written or orally.”

As in most modern Romance languages, every word in French is either masculine or feminine, from a plant to a box to an old shoe. Unlike English, which has the

‘A certain aesthetic’ Lukewarm reception from some 

Você está lendo uma amostra, registre-se para ler mais.

Mais de The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science MonitorLeitura de 5 minsCrime & Violence
Incitement, Sedition, And Conspiracy – Explaining Capitol Crimes
Legal fallout from Jan. 6 is likely to reach hundreds of cases. It could also affect free speech rights and shatter one last political norm.
The Christian Science MonitorLeitura de 6 minsAmerican Government
Truth, Lies, And Insurrection. How Falsehood Shakes Democracy.
At the root of the assault on the U.S. Capitol last week was a false claim of election victory. Disavowal by GOP leaders could help defuse mob anger.
The Christian Science MonitorLeitura de 4 minsCrime & Violence
Europe Criticizes Trump Twitter Ban – But Not For Reason You'd Expect
In Europe, social media platforms like Twitter aren’t seen as having the right to bar speech. Rather, that ability should be limited to governments.