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Zach Galifianakis On Playing A Sasquatch In 'Missing Link' And Why We All Need To Get Outside

"It's a lot of different moving parts, this movie: It's a buddy movie, it's a travel movie, it's got amazing landscapes with this beautiful stop-motion animation that is breathtaking," Galifianakis tells Here & Now.
In the new animated movie "Mr. Link," Zach Galifianakis plays a Sasquatch who goes off in search of his only kin. "It's a buddy movie, it's a travel movie, it's got amazing landscapes with this beautiful stop-motion animation that is breathtaking, I think," he tells Here & Now. (Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)

There’s a new stop-motion animated film out Friday called “Missing Link.”

It stars Zach Galifianakis, known for the “Hangover” films, “Baskets” on FX and his satirical interview show “Between Two Ferns.”

Galifianakis plays a Sasquatch named Mr. Link, who lives alone in the Pacific Northwest. When Mr. Link is discovered by explorer Sir Lionel Frost, voiced by Hugh Jackman, he asks Frost to take him to find his only kin, the yeti.

“It’s a lot of different moving parts, this movie: It’s a buddy movie, it’s a travel movie, it’s got amazing landscapes with this beautiful stop-motion animation that is breathtaking, I think,” Galifianakis tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson.

“I’d love to have his

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