The Atlantic

Uber’s Drivers and Riders Are Locked in a Pine-Scented Battle

Many passengers can’t stand air fresheners. Drivers say they’re just trying to provide a pleasant ride.
Source: Shutterstock

When Kirsten Schultz slid into a Lyft and noticed several air fresheners shoved around the vehicle, she was nervous that it might become a problem. Schultz, a sex educator from Madison, Wisconsin, has asthma and is sensitive to smells. She’d hailed the ride to travel just a few miles from a conference at Stanford University back to her hotel, but it was not long before the overpowering smell of the air fresheners began to make her feel sick.

“I had the window by me down, trying to get as much clean, nonfreshened air as I could,” Schultz says. “About halfway through the ride I realized, I am going to throw up.” She says she spent 10 minutes gagging before the driver realized what was happening. He pulled over, and Schultz lurched out, vomiting on the sidewalk less than a block from her hotel.

Schultz’s predicament is an extreme case of how people react to the car fresheners commonly found in Lyfts and Ubers. Many ride-share customers consider the chemical smells of

Você está lendo uma amostra, registre-se para ler mais.

Interesses relacionados

Mais de The Atlantic

The AtlanticLeitura de 6 minsSociety
We Need a More Targeted Approach to Combatting Global Inequality
A new trove of data may allow us to replace a trickle-down approach with more precise efforts.
The AtlanticLeitura de 6 minsPolitics
Trump’s New Mexico Rally Teased His 2020 Strategy
Speaking to thousands on the outskirts of Albuquerque last night, the president made a pitch to win over a voter bloc that once seemed a pipe dream.
The AtlanticLeitura de 7 mins
‘Close Friends,’ for a Monthly Fee
Gabi Abrao, better known as @sighswoon on Instagram, is “developing a language with the invisible.” Her page is half memes, half photos of her—eating fresh fruit, or trying out a metal detector, or posing in a museum bathroom wearing an incredible ma