The Atlantic

Using D-Day to Remind Trump Who His Real Allies Are

Trump has expressed affection for authoritarian leaders, so it’s unclear what impression the celebrations will make on the president.
Source: Chris Jackson / Pool / Reuters

PORTSMOUTH, England—Strongmen, autocrats, and illiberal adversaries of the United States have long had a place in President Donald Trump’s affections. Democratically elected allies: not so much.

Hosting Trump for a state visit that ended Wednesday, Britain used every bit of pageantry and symbolism in its arsenal to impress upon the “America First” president that it’s important to distinguish friend from foe.

Here in the English harbor town of Portsmouth, a jumping-off point for the D-Day landings that will have taken place 75 years ago on Thursday, Trump watched wartime reenactments and a retelling of the Allied invasion that would repel Hitler’s forces and free Europe from Nazi control.

More than

Você está lendo uma amostra, registre-se para ler mais.

Mais de The Atlantic

The AtlanticLeitura de 3 minsPolitics
Qatar Responds: Don’t Cancel the 2022 World Cup
The tournament’s host country pushes back on Franklin Foer’s proposal that FIFA change course and reallocate funds to women’s soccer.
The AtlanticLeitura de 6 minsPolitics
Malta’s Fledgling Movement for Abortion Rights
The country is the only one in Europe that outright bans abortion, but public perception is slowly shifting.
The AtlanticLeitura de 9 mins
What John F. Kennedy’s Moon Speech Means 50 Years Later
“We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”