NPR

In 'Olive, Again,' Elizabeth Strout Revisits An Old Friend

Ten years after her Pulitzer Prize-winning Olive Kitteridge, Elizabeth Strout returns to the town of Crosby, Maine, where ornery Olive is learning about compassion, connection, and her own self.
Source: Beth Novey

Ten years after Elizabeth Strout won a Pulitzer Prize for her eponymous collection of linked stories about Olive Kitteridge, a difficult but endearing, retired but not retiring middle school math teacher, she returns to coastal Maine with an update — which is just as wonderful as the original.

You don't have to have read to appreciate but you'll probably want to. Like a base coat of paint, it adds depth and helps the finish colors pop. Explaining the genesis of her sequelStrout has written, "That Olive! She continues to surprise me, continues

Você está lendo uma amostra, registre-se para ler mais.

Mais de NPR

NPRLeitura de 3 mins
In The Clever 'Little Joe,' Horror Is Horticultural
A plant scientist (Emily Beechum) breeds a flower that makes people happy in this "effectively creepy indie" that gets its tendrils in you.
NPRLeitura de 3 minsSociety
Why America's 1-Percenters Are Richer Than Europe's
The share of total income of the top 1% of earners in the U.S. more than doubled over four decades. But in Europe, the gains were less dramatic. What accounts for the difference across the Atlantic?
NPRLeitura de 3 mins
A Daughter Talks With Her Father About Coping With Her Mother's Suicide
Sylvia Grosvold was 5 years old when her mother died by suicide. At StoryCorps, Sylvia, now 16, tells her dad how she's processed the loss. "I guess I'm stronger than I think I am," she says.