The New York Times

Hilary Mantel's Triumphant New Novel Brings Thomas Cromwell Across the Finish Line

How suitably some writers come named. Muriel Spark, of the scorching short fiction. Judy Blume, of stories of young girls coming of age. Ann Patchett, in whose work families desperately try to repair their tattered ties.

Then there is Hilary Mantel, the author several books, including an acclaimed suite of novels set in Tudor England, in whose own name can be discerned her themes — of cloaking and secrecy, the weight of responsibility — and, as it happens, the particular pleasure of submitting to her lavish and gory imagination.

When a hawk makes a kill, it drapes its wings over its prey, concealing it from other predators. This gesture is called “mantling,” and it’s a fine description of reading Mantel’s work. The world is blotted out as you are enveloped in the sweep of a story rich with conquest, conspiracy

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