NPR

Why We Grow Numb To Staggering Statistics — And What We Can Do About It

The growing coronavirus death toll doesn't provoke the same type of emotional response that a plane crash might. It's a coping mechanism and how our neurons are wired, says psychologist Elke Weber.
"People are not very good with large numbers," says Elke Weber, a professor of psychology at Princeton University. "We don't discriminate between 150,000 or 300,000 or 3 million." Source: Malte Mueller

COVID-19 has now killed more than 148,000 people in the U.S. On a typical day in the past week, more than 1,000 people died.

But the deluge of grim statistics can dull our collective sense of outrage. And part of that has to do with how humans are built to perceive the world.

"With any kind

Você está lendo uma amostra, registre-se para ler mais.

Mais de NPR

NPRLeitura de 4 mins
'Hacks': A Comedic Generational Divide Gets Bridged, (Jean) Smartly
Two women attempt to reconcile their respective approaches to comedy in HBO Max's smart, sharp (but not too sharp), warm (but not too warm) series.
NPRLeitura de 3 mins
As Many Entertainment Venues Start To Reopen, Nobody Does A Comeback Like The Movies
As the number of vaccinated Americans rises and the number of cases of COVID declines, Hollywood has started the back-to-cinemas drumroll — with mask-wearing superheroes leading the way.
NPRLeitura de 2 mins
Pervis Staples, Founding Member Of The Staple Singers, Dies At Age 85.
Staples, a tenor vocalist, helped to ease his family's iconic gospel group into secular territory, and later found success as a manager and club owner.