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The Great Gilly Hopkins

The Great Gilly Hopkins

Escrito por Katherine Paterson

Narrado por Alyssa Bresnahan


The Great Gilly Hopkins

Escrito por Katherine Paterson

Narrado por Alyssa Bresnahan

avaliações:
4.5/5 (37 avaliações)
Comprimento:
4 horas
Editora:
Lançado em:
Aug 18, 2009
ISBN:
9780061845505
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

Eleven-year-old Gilly has been stuck in more foster families than she can remember, and she's hated them all. She has a reputation for being brash, brilliant, and completely unmanageable, and that's the way she likes it. So when she's sent to live with the Trotters – by far the strangest family yet – she knows it's only a temporary problem.

Gilly decides to put her sharp mind to work and get out of there fast. She's determined to no longer be a foster kid. Before long she's devised an elaborate scheme to get her real mother to come rescue her. Unfortunately, the plan doesn't work out quite as she hoped it would...

A HarperAudio production.

Editora:
Lançado em:
Aug 18, 2009
ISBN:
9780061845505
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Katherine Paterson is one of the world’s most celebrated and beloved authors. Among her many awards are two Newberys and two National Book Awards, and she was recently named a "Living Legend” by the Library of Congress. She has been published in more than 22 languages in a variety of formats, from picture books to historical novels.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre The Great Gilly Hopkins

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37 avaliações / 53 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    Tough foster kid Gilly is not interested in making friends when she is placed in a new home. All she wants, all she's wanted her whole life, is for her mother to come for her -- or for her, Gilly, to find some way of getting to her mother. Will Gilly find a way to make her dreams come true -- or will foster mother Mamie Trotter be able to win Gilly over to a different idea of family?I had read this before, but it's been at least ten years. This time, I listened to the audiobook. I had forgotten that this book is, in its own way, nearly as emotionally evocative as Bridge to Terabithia. Gilly is a complex and initially unlikable character, judgmental and racist, and her development over the course of the story is impressive.
  • (3/5)
    It had a good moral and the story/characters were interesting, but something about this felt incredibly dated. I can't put my finger on it, but it felt like it took place in the 70s or 80s.
  • (5/5)
    Gilly has been bumped from one foster home to another, and has learned the hard way to stay tough and not get too attached to anyone or anything while she waits for her mother to decide that she wants her daughter. Then she gets landed in a home that she thinks is the worst yet, but she eventually realizes it's where she belongs and want to be.From the author who broke my heart with The Bridge to Terabithia, I should have known that I'd love this one, even though I started the thing really not liking Gilly at all. That's as Paterson wants it, of course, and then she makes you fall in love with the girl and her story. Very well done.
  • (3/5)
    I thought Gilly was a great book. It is about a young girl named Gilly ,who is clever, stubborn and smart at first. Her goal and what she really wants with all her heart is to go and live at her mothers house in Virginia. She goes to a new foster mom, at the beginning of the book, named Trotter and her stepson, named William Ernest. Gilly absolutely hates that family at first, but over time she has to live with them and go to school, and she figures out how smart William Ernest can really be and how nice Mrs. Trotter can really be too. Gilly loves trotter and William Ernest so much at the end of the book, that she can't bear to leave them, because her grandmother is coming to take her to her house.( Gilly shows does she does not want to go.) I thought that Gilly ended horribly because she ends up staying with her mother that she really doesn't want to end up with. She misses Mrs. Trotter a lot and she can't believe that her grandmother paid her mom to come. She sends William Ernest lies about her grandmother when she's at her grandmothers house just to make him feel better. I think that shows that she loves him. I think the start of the book and the middle of the book are great and it makes you feel like your Gilly,(and having the hard moments at school or at home.) This book was great about how Gilly changes and I think it is a great book for learning what you can do if you're really angry.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book for three reasons. One reason why I liked this book was because of the written text. In the beginning of the book, Gilly reads a poem to Mr. Randolph. I really liked the words the author used to describe Mr. Randolph's rendition of it by saying he recited the poem "powerfully and musically, on his own favorite lines." You could hear Mr. Randolph reciting these lines like you were sitting next to them reading the book. Another reason why I liked this book was the plot. The whole time you felt everything that Gilly was going through, like you are a foster child yourself. Especially the part where Gilly steals money from Mrs. Trotter and she says that she can go "all the way to Courtney Rutherford Hopkins, all the way home." You not only feel what Gilly is feeling but you feel hurt for Mrs. Trotter because she is trying so hard to make her home a home for Gilly. Another reason I liked this book was the realistic characters. Throughout Gillys stay at Mrs. Trotters, you can see her growth into a young adult. At the end when she calls Mrs. Trotter from the airport and tells her she loves her is the part when you can actually see Gilly grow up right before your eyes. The big message that I got from this book was that even though you may not have your biological family, you will always have a family that loves you.
  • (5/5)
    Gilly is a independent over confident girl. she is a foster kid and she really wants her real mother back. she hates all of her foster parents and she has had a lot of foster parents. then she meets the Trotters at first she hates them then she doesn't know it but she starts to like them but she is still trying to get her mom. When she starts to really like them her mother comes and she go's with her mom. I think Katherine Paterson did a really good job on this book because it has a lot of detail so you know what is going on. I recommend this book to you if you like books that you cant put down. and if you like books with emotion.
  • (4/5)
    This book is very emotionally affecting, so much so that it may be too much for some readers. This story of a bounced-around foster child might be triggering to those who have lived through similar circumstances, and the book's portrayal of race has not aged well. While I don't condone shielding children from all serious issues, I would be careful about recommending this book without carefully considering the audience.
  • (4/5)
    Galadriel "Gilly" Hopkins is one of those protagonists that I immediately despised and grew to dislike more as the book went along. It was clear from the beginning that she would learn some life lessons and be a better child in the end, but it was rough getting there for a reader like myself, who particularly enjoys liking the main character.Gilly is in foster care and has been passed from family to family. Nobody manages to keep her very long because she is just awful, and since no one seems to want her, she doesn't want anybody. But then she is placed with the old and obese widow Mrs. Trotter and her other foster child, a younger boy who Gilly suspects is mentally handicapped. And next door lives an ancient blind black man with a penchant for fine poetry, who always eats dinner with Mrs. Trotter and her foster children. Gilly, who is completely unreligious (Mrs. Trotter is a faithful baptist) and who is also rather racist in her attitudes, thinks this is the worst house she's ever been put in.Around the half-way point of the book, she starts turning the corner and improves. The ending was not at all what I expected or what I hoped it would be. But it was the perfect ending for the book all the same.
  • (5/5)
    Gilly Hopkins was dealt a rough hand in life. She was been moved around multiple times from home to home never being fully satisfied. Being moved into Ms. Trotter's home, she is able to face diversity and meet others that she typically would not even think of speaking too. Insults and sarcasm seem to get her through rough times as well. The feeling to be with her mom is a constant struggle and finally becomes her top priority. Gilly knows right from wrong and even decides to steal to get to her mother. Once she finally gets her wish, she cannot wait to get back to Trotter. The setting here seemed to be set in early time based on some of the terms and references used. Gilly has a hard time being in a integrated class and household. Gilly eventually realizes that homes and family may not always the perfect picture but they can be the perfect fit.
  • (3/5)
    I had mixed feelings about this book. The first reason I liked the book was because it was about a young girl who learns to let herself be vulnerable and open up to others. I like the fact that at first she wants to be called by her real name, Galadriel, but when her teacher wants to call her Galadriel, she yells and says that her name is Gilly. I think it's funny and something readers can sometimes relate to in school. I also liked that Gilly did not want to let Trotter get to know her, but by the end she didn't want to leave and told Trotter that she loved her. It was shocking that Gilly didn't want to go live with her grandmother after all this time of only wanting to be with her real family. One thing I didn't like about the book was how slow the story progressed. I got a bit bored in the middle of the book and kept waiting for something big to happen. Another thing I didn't like was that Gilly was portrayed as a mean girl and didn't listen to anyone or follow the rules. That is not a good message to have in a book because kids are more likely to follow what they read. Overall, the big idea of the book was to be yourself no matter the obstacle.
  • (3/5)
    This book was a quick, easy read. I liked the language that was used. For example, Mr. Randolph, Gilly's black neighbor, spoke like an old man with an accent. You could feel who he was by how he talked. The descriptions of William Ernest's mannerisms also developed his character well. Throughout the story it was easy to envision the dynamics of it all. I also enjoyed how the book ended. Although Gilly's mom didn't turn out who she thought she was, Gilly gained a new perspective on the meaning of family. I think the message of this book is that family isn't always who you're blood related to.
  • (2/5)
    I was interested in reading this chapter book just by the short description on the back cover. I thought this book was going to be a lot different. The first two chapters struck me as misleading in relation to the blonde haired girl on the cover. I had mixed feelings of this book after I completed reading it. I found that it was very hard to like the main character, Gilly. This is because she was prejudice towards African Americans and she swore as an 11 year old. Not forming a liking towards the main character made it difficult for me to get to the climax of the novel. I did like how the author made so many relationships between different characters. For example, The relationship between Trotter and W.E. was a mutual love and appreciation. The giving of those emotions were evident from Trotter to Gilly but were not given in return. I also enjoyed that Miss. Harris was able to make a connection with Gilly and explain how she deals with all of her built up anger.I think this story was very realistic and I appreciated how the author had multiple climaxes to lead to Gilly's epiphany at the end. I also liked how the reader can see how GIlly transformed from the beginning of the book to the end and it was all because of the positive influences from Trotter, Mr. Randolph, and Ms. Harris. These positive mentors guided Gilly in realizing that she needed to change her perspective of others and life. The overall theme is to appreciate someone who loves you. Gilly found that Trotter's love for her was greater than anyone in the past, even though Gilly was mean and disrespectful towards her. She developed a sense of belonging and desire that she had never felt with previous foster families and her own birth mother. I did not like how misleading the content of this book was in relation to the cover and description. I did like the lesson that the book portrayed, however, I do not think it should be read in school because of the prejudice remarks and reference to stealing, lying, and bullying as a 11 year old, no matter the background of that child or circumstances.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a girl named Gilly. She is a foster child. Gilly hates being a foster child! She believes that her mom is going to one day pick her up from her foster home and take her home to her mom's house. She makes a plan to have her mom come rescue her by sending her a letter, but, the plan doesn't turn out the way she planned it. If you like books about foster children, naughty children, and if you want to find out what is in the letter, I think this book is for you.
  • (5/5)
    There's no feeling more worse than to know your not wanted by family. I like this book and felt every emotion Gilly felt. Paterson use of descriptive language in this book takes readers on an emotional roller coaster experiencing the high and low moments in Gilly life. I hoped for a happy ending, but instead, reality presented itself. Life does not always go the way we want it to go and that was Paterson purpose for writing. Sometimes we just have to accept things the way they are, make the best of it, and live our lives.
  • (4/5)
    I had never read this classic until we read it for my elementary book club, and I have to say I really liked it. I heard they are making a movie, and I think I would go see it, or at least watch it after it was released on DVD.
  • (3/5)
    "The Great Gilly Hopkins" by Katherine Paterson is a great story of a young girl, Gilly, who is moved around from one foster home to another. I think that she is scared on the inside and just wants someone to be there to guide and protect her. Gilly wants to control every situation that she is in so that she seems like the bigger one in the household. When she comes home from school Trotter, her foster mother, offers her a snack. Although Gilly may have been hungry she ignores Trotter and runs up to her room and slams the door behind her. Gilly doesn't want to seem vulernable to anyone. I also enjoyed how I could feel the emotions Gilly was feeling throughout the story in the text. When Agnes, a girl from Gilly's class, wants to hang out with her Gilly is annoyed. The reader is able to be inside of GIlly's thoughts when she says, "We? Are you kidding?" I could feel so much annoyance through that small line. I think the author did a great job of adding those small details throughout the entire story. I think that the big idea for this story is to show children that what they have now might not be their "ideal" situation but they should appreciate every minute because no one knows when it may be taken away.
  • (4/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed reading "The Great Gilly Hopkins." One reason I enjoyed the book was because of the realistic, well-developed characters. Gilly's stubborn, witty and clever personality was intriguing to me and I found her to be very funny. In the beginning of the story when Gilly is on her way to meet the Trotters, she says, "But I am not nice. I am brilliant... I am too clever and too hard to manage." Gilly's bold and confident comments and thoughts truly helped to develop her character and allowed the reader to really get inside of her head. Another reason I enjoyed this book was the plot itself. It made you want to keep turning the page and see what kind of adventure (and sometimes trouble) Gilly got into next. Gilly's character developed a great deal as the plot unfolded which was also very interesting to see. She went from a stubborn, closed-off girl to someone who was finally able to develop a bond and relationship with a family, which is what she had always wanted. I believe the big idea of this book is to cherish what you have while you have it and to stay strong during tough times and you will come out even stronger and happier.
  • (5/5)
    This wasn't as exciting as a lot of stories. It wasn't as emotionally powerful, or at least not in the same way, as a lot of stories but when I finished there was never any question or debate as to what I would rate it. It was exactly what it needed to be and I loved the characters and the writing. Gilly is alive and real and I miss her already.
  • (5/5)
    This was a great realistic fiction novel about a gifted student who spends her life in the foster care system from the time she is 3. She is used to being passed around from house to house and so she tries to gain control over the people in her life. She is very gifted and has found that she can get control over the people in her life by suddenly started to fail her school work for no reason. Eventually she finds a foster home with a women and another foster boy whom she starts to actually like. During her first few weeks in this new home Gilly wrote a letter out of anger to her biological mother asking her to come get her. She holds this hope throughout the book that her real mother will come back for her someday. In the end her mother sends her grandmother to come and take her away from this foster home where she has finally found a family. Her illusions of her mother are shattered and Gilly learns to make a new life in her grandmother's home.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed reading The Great Gilly Hopkins, by Katherine Paterson, because of its well-developed characters with strong personalities and well-paced plot that kept the reader interested the entire time. The author was able to create a strong sense of who each character was, especially the main character, Gilly, through unique, expressive language. For example, Gilly's confident, bold comments throughout the book such as "I am too clever and too hard to manage. Gruesome Gilly, they call me" created a strong sense of self in Gilly, giving the reader the feeling they knew exactly who she was. Also, the author kept a nice pace throughout the story of Gilly's adventure through the foster care system, and kept the story interesting with new, unfolding events. This was utilized throughout, but some examples were Gilly coming to her new foster home and meeting her "foster mom" and "foster brother", and then having her real Grandmother come and gain custody of her and letting Gilly meet her real mother. As the story unraveled, the reader got more enthralled in the plot with the different relations between all of the characters, creating a great story that was always engaging. The story told the idea of having to be strong and take on whatever life throws at you, because surviving life is "tough but makes you happy".
  • (2/5)
    I did not particularly like this book. I believe that there was no overall plot to this story. It ended abruptly and left the reader hanging wondering how her experience would be with her mother. I did however like the character development throughout the book. I really enjoyed seeing how Gilly softened up to Trotter and William Earnest and how she helped them learn new things. I believe that this book provided a window into the life of children living in foster care. The overall message of this story was that with a little love and support you can change someone's life.
  • (5/5)
    This book was about a young girl who is a foster child and always got herself into trouble that she constantly had to move to a new foster home. But what caused her to act out so much was because she was determined that her mother would come back for her and take her home. The family that she is within the story actually loves her and accepted her despite her actions towards them, but she is not falling for it at all and just wants to leave. The big idea of this story was family because Gilly eventually learned and accepted that they were her family and she was happy there, until it was time to go, again. I really liked this book for two main reasons. The first reason I liked it was because of the cover illustration. The cover of this book showed Gilly as a strong girl who wasn’t afraid of anything or anyone and could handle anything that came at her. This picture of Gilly with her arms crossed, showing her muscle foreshadowed the story to come, and gave us as readers an idea of who Gilly actually was. The second reason I liked this book was because of the storyline. At one point in the story, Gilly was determined not to like the people she lived with. She wanted to treat them with no respect and love, but eventually, she did not even notice that she was actually enjoying her time there with them, and that her love for them had actually grown so much. For example, when everyone got sick, Gilly decided to take it upon herself to cater to her family and make sure that they all got better, even though she was terribly tired from working so hard. All she wanted was for her family to be back to normal again.
  • (5/5)
    In my opinion, this was a great book. It was a book that I was able to read in one sitting because it kept my attention and made me want to keep reading more. The author did an excellent job making sure the characters were well developed along with the plot. You can tell that Gilly is mad at the world and has anger built up inside of her and is taking it out on everyone. You start to feel for Gilly as she explains that she just wants to be with her real mother and that is her goal throughout the story. You get a sense of family in the book as Miss Trotter treats Gilly like her own even if Gilly is resisting. I liked that by the end of the book you see Gilly transform into a completely different person. She bonds with her foster brother by teaching him to read and fight, but also takes care of her entire foster family when they are sick. This is not something you could imagine her doing in the beginning so the author does a good job transitioning her into a new person. It helps you relate to Gilly and understand her as a character so that you can become more attached to the book. The way the author ended the story made me mad at first, but then it made me love the book even more. We expected a happy ending since Gilly ended up with her real grandmother and met her mother, but that was not the case. It catches you off guard, but teaches you that not all stories have a happy ending, which was a part of the big idea. The other part of the big idea was that dreams are sometimes better than reality. Also that we take things for granted and sometimes don’t realize until its too late.
  • (5/5)
    In my opinion this was a great book. I loved this book for a few different reasons. One reason being that the author wrote the book in such a way that you could see the progression of how Gilly transformed. In the beginning of the book the author portrayed Gilly as an angry resentful child, because she lacked love, but as the story progressed you were able to see how Gilly was becoming a loving young lady, because of how she connected to Trotter, William Ernest, and Mr. Randolph. I also enjoyed this book, because it had a playful side, while addressing a serious topic. The author added playfulness by Gilly’s thoughts, such as when her thoughts were about Trotter being fat. The immature thoughts Gilly had brought humor, but also helped to show the immaturity and anger of Gilly. The main message of this book was to introduce the reader to the sensitive topic of foster children, and some of the struggles they battle throughout their life.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this chapter book. I really enjoyed Gilly’s thoughts in her head throughout the story and the way the author expressed those thoughts. For example, when Trotter was talking to the principal at Gilly’s new school, Gilly thought to herself ‘Shut up Trotter’. It helped the audience understand what Gilly was thinking at all times. I also liked the characters in the story and how they are all portrayed through not only the author’s point of view, but also Gilly’s point of view. The main message of this story is that you never know how good you have it until it is gone.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a foster child Gilly who wants nothing but to get back to her mother so she has done everything she can to get kicked out of every foster home the state has put her in. In the book Gilly gets put with this family Mrs. Trotter and her adopted son W.E. who at first she can not stand and thinks that they are dumb and trashy. She tries to do everything she can to get them to dislike her. Not only does Gilly try to get Mrs. Trotter and W.E. to not like her she does this with everyone she comes in contact with because she has convinced herself that all she needs is her real mother and herself. In the book she tries to steal money and buy a bus ticket to go see her real mother and gets caught. After this she realizes how much every one in her life really cares for her, as well as them for her. She finally realizes this and her real Grandmother shows up to pick her up to live with her and she has to leave Mrs. Trotter and W.E. and Mr. Randolph who is a neighbor that always hangs out with Mrs. Trotter and W.E. and Gilly. So Gilly moves with her grandmother and realizes that her mother not only left her but left her Grandmother as well and they have some things in common and Gilly starts to like her Grandmother. Finally Gilly gets to meet her real mother and realizes that, her real mother never loved her and never wanted her. Mrs. Trotter tells her that life is tough and she tells Gilly she loves her and Gilly says it back.In this book one thing I like is that the way the narrator tells the story is from Gilly’s perspective which is being a foster child in the system. In the book you can see when Gilly says she likes moving around because staying in one place is boring and she also says in the book that all she needs is her real mother and herself to be taken care of. When you look at the way she is talking about her real mother you can see where a real foster child might feel the same way. Another reason I like this book is the way the author shows Gilly’s progression of going from hating everyone to loving them. In the book they show this by how she hated Mrs. Trotter in the beginning and at the end of the book she is telling Mrs. Trotter she loves her.
  • (5/5)
    In my opinion, this was a wonderful book to read. I really liked the language the author used. For example, its setting is around the 1960-70s in the South. Gilly has moved around a few time so she isn't aware that Black and White people now get along. She doesn’t like her teacher, Miss Harris and even writes her a poem proving it. However, they both discover how alike they are as the story progresses. I also liked the plot of the story. It was a very unique plot line. For example, I expected a very happy ending: Gilly was going to be with her mother once again. But, plot twist! Gilly’s mother didn’t want her back. When Gilly is forced to move to Virginia with her grandmother, she ends up not liking it there. Finally, even though there were no pictures in the book, the author used such descriptive words that it was easy to create a vivid image in your mind. The way Trotter, Mr. Randolph, and William Earnest were depicted was so specific that is was almost like you became Gilly as you read the book. The main message of this story is to not judge a book by its cover. Trotter and William Earnest in the end of the book are not what Gilly expected them to be. Neither is her mother. Gilly herself goes through a shocking transformation.
  • (5/5)
    The Great Gilly Hopkins is a story about an intolerable, manipulative foster child who learns that families come in all shapes and sizes as long as there is love. I really liked this book for a couple of reasons. First, I liked the fact that the author did not “sugarcoat” Gilly’s thoughts and actions. Gilly cursed, said mean things and thought even worse things about the people in her life. This was a realistic view of how a foster child in her situation may have felt and reacted. It allowed the reader to develop a personal attitude toward Gilly, just as though she were a real person. I personally felt angry, embarrassed and sorry for her throughout the story. Another reason I enjoyed this book was because of the message that just because someone gives birth to you, does not make them a mother. Gilly thought that everything would be perfect if she were with her mother who loved her. However, when she finally meets her and realizes that she does not love her, she understands that Trotter, her foster mother, loved and cared for her like she were her own daughter. Those in Gilly’s life were not conventional, but her family nonetheless.
  • (2/5)
    I was really disappointed with this book. When I read the short description of the book, I was excited to read of a little girl’s obstacles growing up in foster care. The book did do this, but I also expected to like Gilly, which I did not. Gilly was an angry little girl (understandably so). She was judgmental, racist, and disrespectful, with little redeeming qualities. Gilly cursed, made racist comments, and had little to no regard for the feelings of those around her. This character betrayal of Gilly made it nearly impossible for me to like her. Therefore, I did not enjoy the book.The main idea of this story is to appreciate and notice the people in your life that truly care for you. The grass is not always greener on the other side.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed The Great Gilly Hopkins for many reasons. First, I loved the author’s style of writing. Although the story was not told in first person, the emotional connections created with Gilly allowed me to feel as if I knew her personally. “Trotter and Mr. Randolph chuckled happily. People were so dumb sometimes you almost felt bad t take advantage of them- but not too bad.” I loved the way the author describes what’s Gilly is thinking when she is not speaking. It gave a clear insight on Gilly’s negative attitude and bitterness toward life. if the book was not written this way, the message would not have been nearly this powerful. Second, I love the author’s language use throughout the book. Her use of analogies and descriptive words helped to paint a clear image of what was happening in the story. For example, the author used analogies to described the way in which Gilly was feeling, “Dread lay on Gilly’s stomach like a dead fish on the beach. Even when you don’t look at it, the stink pervades everything.” Using this type of language was much more useful than if she had said something along the lines of “Gilly was feeling anxious because she knew she was the reason her grandmother visited.” The language use and imagery allows readers to physically feel what Gilly had been feeling. Because this book contained such a serious topic, it is important for readers to get a feel for what a foster child might endure. I think the author did a great job of this. I believe the message of this book was a good one. Gilly endured so much as a child and still ended up finding a loving family that changed her for the better. I believe this demonstrates that you can still be strong and get through the many tough situations you may be given.