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Robot Zot!

Robot Zot!

Escrito por Jon Scieszka

Narrado por James Naughton


Robot Zot!

Escrito por Jon Scieszka

Narrado por James Naughton

avaliações:
4/5 (14 avaliações)
Comprimento:
8 minutos
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780545555128
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

This is the tale of a quixotic robot determined to conquer the earth. But once he discovers the princess…a toy cell phone…his mission takes a new course. Robot Zot must learn how to be a hero -- in the name of true love.
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780545555128
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Jon Scieszka is the National Ambassador for Children's Literature emeritus and the bestselling author of more than twenty-five books for kids, including The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales, Math Curse, Robot Zot!, and the Time Warp Trio series. Jon founded Guys Read to encourage a passion for reading among young boys, with the philosophy that boys love to read most when they are reading things they love. A former elementary school teacher, Jon lives in Brooklyn with his family. For more great books, more great facts, and more about your favorite authors, head over to www.guysread.com. You'll be glad you did.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Robot Zot!

4.1
14 avaliações / 10 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (3/5)
    This little robot has it all wrong. But you can't feel bad for him when in his perspective he's a wild, unmitigated success! I had to point a lot out to my kids, but we all rolled with laughter as Zot "conquered" Earth, fell in love with a queen, and saved the day - while only not really doing any of those things.
  • (4/5)
    Review: This book is about a tiny robot named Robot Zot and his sidekick Bot who travel to earth to conquer some kitchen appliances. These appliances are rather harmless, but to Robot Zot they are bad and se he must destroy them. Robot Zot destroys a mixer, a coffee maker, a toaster, a vacuum tube, and a TV. He also escapes from two baby dolls and a fearsome dog. While Robot Zot is trying to escape from the two dolls, he sees the most beautiful queen of all earth, a play telephone. He grabs the play phone and they escape together and go back to the land where Robot Zot is from. Genre: Science FictionGenre Critique: This science fiction involves a robot that comes from some strange land down to earth to fight off evil kitchen appliances. The characters in this book have qualities that are not human like but that take place in a normal household. Critique: The style of this book is written with lots of onomatopoeias. The book includes words such as wham, bam, crush, beep, boop, bleep, growl, brrring, boom, and woof. All of these words in the book add to the character of the robot. They make him have a more robot tone to his voice. The style of this book helps the story and adds to it.
  • (4/5)
    Scieszka, J. (2009). Robot Zot! New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.9781416963943Appetizer: Warlord Robot Zot has arrived on Earth to conquer the Earthlings. As his battles begin, it turns out he's after different Earthlings than the reader would expect. As Robot Zot seeks to conquer foe after foe, he finds someone worth fighting for.So very imaginative and fun!Jon Scieszka uses onomatopoeia, rhymes, repetition and a fun rhythm to tell Robot Zot's adventure. It's hard not to be energized by this story. For reals, I was reading silently to myself, but I found that I HAD to read this book out loud. And you know, maybe pump my fist up in the air a couple of time. Luckily, nobody saw this. Cause, the last thing I need is people knowing I'm crazy.A teacher could easily have students chant some of the repeated lines throughout the story, like Robot Zot's battle cry: "Robot Zot--Never fall. Robot Zot--conquer all!"...that's quite a phrase to have students repeat to themselves. Kind of The Little Engine That Could's "I think I can. I think I can," for a new and even more determined generation.With a lot of humor, David Shannon's illustrations do an excellent job of showing readers a new perspective into some very ordinary objects.I more than kinda-sorta could have done without the last page though. Someone is blamed for all of Zot's distraction and I felt very bad for the poor character. Wah.Dinner Conversation:"Robot Zot--Wham Bot!Robot Zot--Bam Bot!""No one stop Robot Zot.Robot Zot crush lot!""Zot was not joking.Zot is never joking.""Zot blasts into anotherbunker. And there he seesher. The most amazing Earthperson...ever.Zot knows that she is theQueen of all Earth."To Go with the Meal:While probably best to entertain, energize and encourage students, a teacher could in theory bring this book in to share with even middle grade or young adult students to show the destruction Robot Zot leaves in his wake. Some teachers may also object to having this book in the classroom because Zot is a very violent figure. Even though his attacks are aimed at objects instead of living creatures, some still may not like the underlying aggression. (And this is understandable, it's not too unusual to do a superhero read aloud and have one young listener turn to his or her neighbor and pretend to or actually punch another kid.)With kids of all ages, an art teacher could focus on the way the the book shows different perspectives on ordinary objects, and students could do their own sketches or paintings reflecting that style. (Other books that play with perspective this way include Too Many Toys or Chris Van Allsburg's The Sweetest Fig. Tasty Rating: !!!!
  • (4/5)
    Robot Zot is a fun book for children because the robot thinks he is big and powerful. This is also a fun read-aloud book because the words are written as if a robot were talking. The illustrations are great becuase it makes the robot look big and tough but at the end of the book you realize he is just a small toy that destroys a kitchen.
  • (3/5)
    The bright acrylic illustrations in this picture book lend themselves well to the exciting, adventurous plot. Children who like space and adventure will enjoy the main character and his antics, and will find humour in Robot Zot's attempts to destroy the "enemies" he finds in a human kitchen. Shannon's illustrations offer fun perspectives which add to the book's humour and zaniness.
  • (3/5)
    Grades: K-4Genre: Science FictionThemes: Humor,In Robot Zot. Zot sets out to conquer the earth. He battles the toaster, the T.V. and finds the Queen. The most beautiful creature (the cordless telephone). He then has to get past the dog. The illustrations are bright and bold. There are very few words in the story. I would use this book to teach the feature of Science Fiction.
  • (5/5)
    Robot Zot has come to conquer! But he's in for a surprise when he meets his Queen.This bright new picture book from veterans John Sciezska and David Shannon is packed with action from stem to stern. Robot Zot is a character K-2 kids will love to laugh at. The text is a mix of Zot's speech and a mild narration, but the pictures tell a whole different story, and make the whole book a riot, stuffed full of laughs. The illustrations are bright and loud the whole way through, with plenty of details tucked all around. Lots to look at-- ideal to read to one or two kids (and have them help you make the Robot Zot's robot noises), but could also be good for a storytime in a library or classroom.
  • (4/5)
    This science fiction book follows ROBOT ZOT the Wham and Bam Bot. He lands on a planet as declares he will "crush lot." Though he crashes in someone's back yard, he soon finds his way into the house and begins destroying all the foes that lay ahead... He defeats the whisk, coffee pot, and blender in the kitchen, and turns to see "Earth's shiny Captain," the toaster. Just when he thought he was done, his ears heard a blasting noise coming from another room! As he makes his way towards the voice, he becomes entangled in monstrous cords lying in his path (vacuum cleaner) as a man is seen scratching in his head in the kitchen, wondering what in the world happened? When Robot Zot finally escaped the evil clutches of the vacuum cleaner, he faces his foe head on and decimates him. The robot soon finds himself in another room and rescues the Queen (a toy telephone) from the evil guard and scary sentry (dolls) holding her captive. Robot Zot makes it outside with the Queen but finds himself stopped dead in his tracks by yet another enemy who "Woofs" quite a bit. Though Robot Zot is willing to fight the foe until the bitter end, he disappears leaving Zot victorious. In the background, we see the man in the house picking up the dog and walking back inside. Robot Zot and his Queen take off from earth on their way to save more days in galaxies far away. The ending page shows the man yelling at the distressed dog in the destroyed kitchen.
  • (5/5)
    This books main idea is for students to have an imagination. When students imagine things, their creative side comes out. This is important for students to have with creative writing. I like this books for three reasons. The illustrations in this book bring it to life. It allows a reader to see how the robot thinks the appliances are villains he needs to conquer. In one scene he thinks that the coffee pot needs to be taken down and defeated. The point of view is told from the third person point of view. Having it from the third person point of view is good for this book. It tones down the voice of Zot, the robot. The dialogue increases the suspense throughout the book. Tjhe dialogue is sometimes in really big text with Zot screaming - "No one can stop Robot Zot!" The writing throughout the book is scattered throughout the pages, but this keeps the reader engaged. The excitement in the writing makes the reader want to keep reading. "Zot challenges Earth's shiny Captain. You are looking at Zot, tough guy? Zot blasts the Captain. The Captain blasts back, then blows a fuse." This is an example of why the reader would want to keep reading forward. This book is great for adventure and action reading!
  • (5/5)
    I loved this story, with its almost bizarre ending. Very sweet.