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Leonard the Terrible Monster

Leonard the Terrible Monster

Escrito por Mo Willems

Narrado por Mo Willems


Leonard the Terrible Monster

Escrito por Mo Willems

Narrado por Mo Willems

avaliações:
4.5/5 (43 avaliações)
Comprimento:
6 minutos
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2007
ISBN:
9780545521253
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

Leonardo is terrible at being a monster. He can't seem to frighten anyone. Then he comes up with a plan to find the perfect nervous little boy and scare the tuna salad out of him. Will his plan succeed, or will he come up with a better idea?
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2007
ISBN:
9780545521253
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor


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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Leonard the Terrible Monster

4.7
43 avaliações / 44 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    Leonardo was a terrible monster who couldn't scare anyone. In his quest to become scarier, Leonardo discovers that friendship is more powerful than fear. Big picture book with simple, yet perfect illustrations, this is great for a monster-themed preschool story time.
  • (4/5)
    Fun book for kids.
  • (4/5)
    fun and silly book
  • (3/5)
    Leonardo was a terrible monster, not because he was terrifying, but because he wasn't, and although he searched high and low for someone to frighten, his efforts were often met with laughter, rather than fear. Then one day, after doing much investigation (market researching comes to the picture-book!), he discovers the perfect target: Sam. But when Leonardo's attack produces the effect he'd been hoping for - a tearful victim - he has a change of heart...Chosen as one of our October selections, over in the Picture-Book Club to which I belong, where our theme this month is 'witches and monsters,' Mo Willems' Leonardo, the Terrible Monster definitely falls into the kinder, gentler monster-tale variety. The oversized pages, in various muted colors, boast plenty of blank space, with out-sized text and illustrations all the more prominent, as a result. This is a cute tale, with cute illustrations. I think the tall format lends itself to storytelling, particularly with younger, pre-school children. Recommended to little monsters everywhere, and to fans of Mo Willems' distinctive style.
  • (4/5)
    Leonardo is a terrible monster... because he isn't terrifying enough! Along comes Sam. Leonardo sets out to prove he can scare Sam, yet actually learns a lesson along the way.

    Written and artfully illustrated by Mo Willems, this book is perfect for Halloween time and reading aloud. The kids will worry about Sam, but just reassure them that all will definitely end well!
  • (5/5)
    I love this book because of the illustrations that tell the story of a not scary monster. He tries to be like other monsters, but decides to be a little boy's friend instead when he is in need. The facial expressions are funny and I like the layout of the book because the pages are so big, with some small illustrations that go along with how the little boy and Leonardo feel.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my all-time favorites. Mo Willems is a spectacular author. He creates a humorous story that helps to teach kids important social skills, such as being kind to others and empathy. It is also really funny and in some ways introduces young readers to the antihero. Good for infants through elementary school, in my opinion. The illustrations are great and the language is very accessible .
  • (5/5)
    Leonardo is supposed be a terrible, scary monster, but he's not. He doesn't have big teeth or scary eyes. He's furry, small, and almost cute. But he still has to scare someone! So he decides to find the most scaredy cat in the world and scare him--and that would be Sam. Leonardo manages to make Sam cry, but he finds out it's because Sam has had a horrible day: his big brother stole his action figure and a bird pooped on his head! Leonardo feels really bad about this and reconsiders whether he's meant to be a terrible monster. The illustrations are drawn in the typical style of Mo Willems and are splashed across the page with relatively few words. Regardless, the books are a hit far beyond "age 3 to 36", Willems suggests on the book. I'd up to about 103.
  • (5/5)
    Leonardo is a terrible monster. He cannot manage to scare anyone at all even though he tries really hard. Frustrated, he decides to find the most scaredy-cat kid in the whole world and scare the tuna salad out of him. When he finds the boy Sam, he scares him and the boy cries. Leonardo is happy until the boy says that he didn't scare him. He was crying because of his other problems like a broken toy, a hurt toy, and his lack of friends. So Leonardo decides that if he can't be a terrible monster, he can be a wonderful friend! A wonderful story for children aged 3-6 with simple text and vivid illustrations in shades of brown, blue, purple, green, and pink.
  • (5/5)
    I love Mo Willems books not only because of the simple illustratory style, but mostly because of children's reaction to his stories and the ease in which they lend themselves to public storytelling, particularly if you have a bit of dramatic flair. When I read Mo Willem's books to children, it is easy to create different voices for the characters, and the children just eat it up. In this story, I employed fake crying while reading the page with Sam's rant(which they thought was very funny) and at the end I paused before yelling out, "Boo!" and half the children jumped in their seats then burst out in delighted laughter. It is also easy to employ a craft project if need be to Willem's books in the form of elephant or pig "masks" (play outside) . In this book's case the children were able to pick out their choice of a reproduced silly monster, color it, and glue it onto a paper plate with a popsicle stick attached. Puppet shows and monster parades ensued. Willems is able to bring alive a child's imagination and playfulness with his simple drawings and character's dialog and in my opinion that is exactly what a children's author would strive to do.
  • (5/5)
    This book is GREAT!!! It is SO fun to read and the story is just AWESOME!!! I highly recommend it!!!
  • (5/5)
    A funny start that turns serious with a happy ending. Has Mo Willems created a book that wasn't exceptional?
  • (5/5)
    Personal Response: I loved this story. The illustrations are hilarious and I love when Sam explains to Leonardo all the reasons that he's crying.Curricular Connection: This story could be read in a kindergarden or first grade classroom. After the story, students could draw their own pictures of monsters.
  • (4/5)
    Leonardo is a terrible monster. He can't scare anyone! And even when he thinks he's managed it, he's wrong. This is the hilarious tale of a surprising monster and the choices he makes. Mo Willems' distinct minimalist style is so much fun to look at, and the hidden details are very funny.
  • (5/5)
    This is agreat book that teaches children how important it is to be themselves and not something else. Leonardo tries really hard to be a scary monster but isn't very good at it. When he finally decides to pick a victim to scare, he realizes that it wasn't his actions that made the little boy cry. When Leonardo the Monster decides to hug the little boy instead of scare him, he realizes that perhaps he is meant to be a wonderful friend and not a mean monster after all.
  • (3/5)
    Should I feel bad that I don't love this title by Mo Willems? First, I hate the font. Maybe because I don't like country OR western. Second, the illustrations remind me of cheap tom and jerry cartoons of a bygone era (flat and boring). I know the pigeon was flat too but that was a novelty. I am getting a little tired of the same old thing from Mo. The blank space on the pages does lend itself to some anticipatory moments but the monster is just not cute enough for me to care what happens to him. Sorry.
  • (4/5)
    This book shows a monster who just can't seem to be scary. He does everything in his power to be scary - but he just isn't. He finally tries to scare a little unsuspecting boy - and he puts everything he has into scaring this little boy. Does he scare him? You will have to read to find out. But - they do become great friends. The illustrations are really cool with a lot of negative space and small little pictures in one corner of the page. The opposite page is usually used for text, and text alone. He does derive from his usual system from time to time in order to show high energy and action. This is a fun book for boys and girls.
  • (5/5)
    Children can relate to this story. I feel like children, though young, can learn the lesson that you don't have to be something just because your told to or 'supposed' to. A monster is supposed to be scary, but that's just not Leonardo. Children can learn a lot from this story.
  • (5/5)
    Leonardo can't seem to scare people, even though he's a monster. His solution is to find the most scaredy-cat kid ever!This picture book offers a large format with lots of space on the page, a circus-like font, and lots of color. The best of the humorous illustrations is Leonardo engaging in a satisfied little fist pump after success. The story is a pleasant tale with the moral that being a good friend is more important than changing yourself - any soppiness is mitigated by the innately hilarious drawings.Recommended for any readers K - 4.
  • (5/5)
    Adorable book about Leonardo the monster who did not succeed in scary people like normal monsters. He gets frustrated with himself, and tries to scare a little boy who is suppose to be the "easy target". In the end he makes a friend and realizes it's okay to be a nice monster... and trick his friend... only every now and then!
  • (4/5)
    My girls loves monsters. And this book is not scary at all. In fact, it made them laugh! especially, at the end when sometimes good friends can have fun by scaring each other too. The font was a bit difficult to read, since they are very young readers but the illustration captured their attention. A good book on friendship and self-identity.
  • (4/5)
    Very cute book, Mo Willems seems to be invincible. I mean, almost all of his books are just great! This is a cute book about an insecure monster that tries his best to find himself and discovers his self identitiy.
  • (5/5)
    This delightful story uses humor, surprise, and visual effects to capture the emotion and humanity of the central conflict. Willems has wonderfully unique monsters and a creative use of font, dialoge bubbles, and text to illustrate the thoughts and words of characters. It provides a wonderful example of focusing on positive traits instead of inadequacies and comparisons.
  • (4/5)
    this one was good for storytime, they especially liked the double page spread where Sam rambles on about why he was upset.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful, didactic picture book with a valuable lesson about frienship. Easy reading level.
  • (5/5)
    I LOVE LEONARDO! He is a monster who isn't good at being scary, so he finds the most scaredy-cat kid in the world and scares him, which triggers the biggest blow-up I have ever seen in a picture book. Leonardo decides that he will be friends with Sam because Sam has no friends.
  • (5/5)
    Omigoodness this was so adorable - funny, touching, not sappy. I loved the expressions and the body language of Leonardo. I loved the spread of him doing research. I love the font and the page design. I love the colors. And, of course, I loved the ending. You know what? It might not be the most momentous book ever, but I loved everything about it and disliked nothing, so I think I just have to give it the full five stars!
  • (5/5)
    An adorable picture book about a monster who can't scare anyone that decides it's better to be a friend. Loved it!
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book for a couple of reasons. I liked how the author added certain aspects to the story that aren't typically used. For example, the author used an asterisk when the narrator said, "He didn't have 1,642* teeth like Tony". At the bottom of the page the author added, "*Note: Not all teeth shown", to assure the reader that the illustrations given do now show all 1,642 teeth. Since this wasn't an informational text, I wouldn't imagine an author using this symbol. It added humor to the story, in an extremely creative way. I also liked the author/illustrator's use of empty space in the book. For example, when Leonardo was researching to find the most frightful kid to scare, he discovered Sam. Turning on to the next page, you can see two large blank pages with a small illustration of sad Sam sitting on the bottom, left corner of the page. This emphasized Sam's sense of loneliness through the empty pages rather than words. Along with this attribute, the author fills in the empty space, on another page, to emphasize Sam's emotions yet again. For example, once Leonardo scares him, Sam begins to cry which makes Leonardo happy because he believes he is the reason Sam is crying. Sam explains, using two entire pages with bold and colored print to express his anger. This shows the authors ability to fill up the entire page with words, rather than illustrations, which is rare for a picture book. The main idea of this book is to accept who you are and not to judge others before getting to know them.
  • (5/5)
    This book would be good to use for reading with expression. I think students will like this book because they will feel bad for the monster.