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Frog Went A-Courtin'

Frog Went A-Courtin'

Escrito por Jong Langstaff

Narrado por John Langstaff


Frog Went A-Courtin'

Escrito por Jong Langstaff

Narrado por John Langstaff

avaliações:
3.5/5 (13 avaliações)
Comprimento:
7 minutos
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 1983
ISBN:
9780545521123
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

John Langstaff's classic version of a 400-year-old Scottish ballad that tells the tale of the courtship of Mr. Frog and Miss Mouse.
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 1983
ISBN:
9780545521123
Formato:
Audiolivro


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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Frog Went A-Courtin'

3.5
13 avaliações / 13 Análises
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Classificação: 0 de 5 estrelas

Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    I absolutely love the style of illustrations in this book. All of the insect characters are drawn to perfection and have wonderful expressions on their faces. The book is based on an old song that was brought over to the US from Scotland. So basically it is part of oral tradition, it mentions int he book that the song was sung in Appalachia often. It has a shocking end which is illustrated with a giant cat scaring the entire wedding party, which always brings ahhhs and oooo's from the audience.
  • (1/5)
    This book was really weird. I found it fairly outdated and not a good resource to put in my classroom library.
  • (3/5)
    A Frog who cannot muster up the courage to go "a-courtin". Finally does. The story of his Courtship
  • (3/5)
    I suppose this one is a classic, but it just seemed so old school. The illustrations though are fantastic!
  • (3/5)
    Maybe a little too old fashioned, like the classic illustrations, though.
  • (4/5)
    Could be used to teach ELL certain words through song. Songs are an easier way to memorize and learn language. Read parts of the book each day and put it to the tune in the back of the book.Rhyme and rhythm flow throughout it. Used to teach students how to make their writing flow and use repetition like "Next to come, next to come..." Can also be used to teach good use of commas and colons.
  • (3/5)
    A story/song from brought from Scotland to the United States over 400 years ago. The story is about a frog who wants to marry a mouse and their courtship and wedding.
  • (3/5)
    This book was so cool that a frog is getting married, and who plays the piano. All of the animals help out miss mouse and frog for their wedding, which in my opinion teaches children that people should help one another.
  • (5/5)
    Simply wonderful, timeless classic picture book. The text is from the traditional folk song and if you know the tune you will find yourself singing instead of reading this book. In fact, we borrowed a CD from the library with the song and have been singing ever since. Lots of fun! Rojankovsky's illustrations are amazing. I've always been fond of his work. He uses a colour palette consisting of the primary colours (red, yellow, blue) with some green and black. These bright bold pages are alternated with a more subdued green and black palette and the effect is marvelous. A wonderful book to experience!
  • (4/5)
    Based on an old traditional folk song, Ackerman tells the story of a frog who loved a mouse and was intent on marriage. This is a cooperative effort, with everyone bringing something to the celebration. Langstaff researched the tale back some 400 years to the original Scottish song, but relied most heavily on the version sung in various parts of America. The book includes the music notes at the end, so you can plunk it out on the piano (or guitar?) if you’ve never heard it sung. Feodor Rojankovsky won a Caldecott medal for his illustrations. They are wonderfully detailed; even the tiniest flea is given a fully emotive depiction.
  • (5/5)
    Frog went A-Courtin is a Caldecott Gold Medal Winner and is also an old folk song written in Scotland that is filled with rhymes and love story adventurous way. The award was made because it was "The most distinguished American picture book for children". The song is meant to to be sung and not read to children. It is a story of a mighty frog riding on his high horse that had a dream of marrying a beautiful Mistress Mousie that sit to spin. But Miss Mousie would never marry without her Uncle Rat's consent. Uncle Rat's ask Miss Mousie multiple questions about the where's, will's, and who's of the wedding and after they were answered he gave his consent. I have always been told that before a man could ask a woman to marry him, he should talk to her parents and so on to ask for a blessing. The old folk song teaches boys at a young age to know how to respect a girls values and her family.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: "Frog went A-Courtin'" is an old folk song that has been passed down for over 400 years. It is meant to be sung to children, instead of read to them, due to its catchy ballad tune. The folk song tells the story of a frog who wished to marry Miss Mousie. He was unable to , however, until consent was given by her Uncle Rat. After asking Miss Mousie several questions about the wedding (where the wedding breakfast will be, who will make the wedding gown, etc.), he gives consent for Frog to marry her.Review: Filled with rhymes on each page and a catchy mood sure to put a smile on any child's face, "Frog went A-Courtin'" is a fantastic read in a K-2 classroom. In this version, the story is actually told as a story and NOT as a song (although the song is located in the back of the book). That being said, I can find myself reading this story out loud in the future, and then putting music to the words for my students to sing.
  • (3/5)
    Set to song, this story tells of a frog who wishes to marry a mouse. After receiving permission from uncle rat, insects begin bringing things to decorate the wedding. The new bride and groom are chased off by a cat and the rest is left up to the reader's imagination. I vaguely remember reading this as a small child, but I have to say, it didn't make much of an impact then or now. While it does make children aware of different insects and engages the imagination, it would not be my first choice book for a Caldecott winner. In the classroom this could lead to a discussion of the different types of insects found in the story. You could also introduce the song and present it to parents at the next gathering.