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Troublemaker

Troublemaker

Escrito por Andrew Clements

Narrado por Keith Nobbs


Troublemaker

Escrito por Andrew Clements

Narrado por Keith Nobbs

avaliações:
4/5 (20 avaliações)
Comprimento:
2 horas
Lançado em:
Jul 26, 2011
ISBN:
9781442304550
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

Holt Adkin is the kind of kid who every teacher hopes will be assigned to someone else's classroom, that every parent hopes will go hang out with some other family's children. He's from a home where there's a lot of yelling, a lot of arguing, a lot of instability. Holt is smart, scrappy, and not afraid of anything, least of all a trip to the principal's office or even the threat of suspension or expulsion. The only person at school who seems able to reach him is Mr. Patten, the art teacher. Holt has talent...but about zero desire to use it.Then Holt's brother, Winn---who seems to be on the fast track to a permanent jail cell--begins to wise up and untangle the mess he's making of his life, he tells Holt point blank that Holt needs to change, too. And Holt tries--but to change the attitudes of kids and teachers, to stop hanging with his less-than-savory friend, to take responsibility for his thoughts and actions--becomes the biggest challenge of his life, especially when a jealous former buddy tries to sabotage his efforts.From the master of the school story, a book about mentors and role models, about choosing friends, about the fine line between good-humored mischief and dangerous behavior, about the way everyday choices can close or open doors.
Lançado em:
Jul 26, 2011
ISBN:
9781442304550
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Andrew Clements is the author of picture books and novels for young readers, including Because Your Daddy Loves You and the perennial bestseller Frindle. He lives in Baldwin, Maine, and can also be found at www.andrewclements.com.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Troublemaker

4.2
20 avaliações / 9 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (2/5)
    I have very mixed feelings about this book. At the beginning of the book, it seems like Clay is only acting out to impress his older brother. Initially, Clay turns himself around for his brother also, but he soon realizes that the change is a positive one for him as well. On one hand, I love that this is a story of living for you and not to impress others. On the other hand, this also seems like a story intended to scare kids into behaving, which I do not really like. This books shows that some school rules are silly, but that kids must suck it up and endure them or end up a delinquent. I like books that advocate creativity, not blind obedience.
  • (4/5)
    Great school story told about a wise-crack who is compelled by his older brother to change his ways, before it's too late. Boys in the 5th and 6th grades who think that there aren't any books to appeal to them will devour this newest offering from the author of Frindle.

    This book also marks #30 out of #30 for me on Vermont's DCF list 2012-13. Goal to read all 30 ... completed!
  • (5/5)
    It was really cool an funny.you should read it
  • (5/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

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    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (4/5)
    Meet Clay, who absolutely idolizes his older brother, Mitch. Everything Clay does, from drawing a funny-mean picture of the principal to ducking his office disciplinary meetings, he has only one thought in his head, "Man, I can't wait to laugh about this with Mitch." But he'll have to wait a little longer, because Mitch is in jail. And when Mitch gets home, he has some ideas about how Clay should live his life from now on. But no matter what Clay does, he can't seem to escape his bad reputation (cue electric guitars).I'm not familiar with Andrew Clements, but apparently he wrote a bestseller called Frindle. Based on this book, I'm willing to check that one out. The age group of the kids in this story is sixth grade, making it perfect for 7th graders who might miss sixth grade life, or fifth graders looking ahead. While the book packs a pretty powerful message about the joys of staying out of trouble, kids with real disciplinary issues might find it a little hokey. But if you've got a sweet goofball, this might be the book for them. For middle schoolers, the print is pretty large, and some of your kids might dismiss it as childish as a result, and I hate to say it, but the cover is really unattractive. Still, that's why we don't judge books by their covers, right? (I totally do...)Anyways, good book for struggling readers, kids who are silly, or kids looking for a fast-paced read who don't really dig the fantasy thing. Decent writing, relatable characters, and a believable plot add up to a nice little read for middle schoolers. The only part I had trouble with is when the characters, as 5th graders, snuck out of the house at 1:00 am to smash pumpkins on Halloween. But then, I am, and always have been, a serious goody-goody.For 5th - 8th graders
  • (4/5)
    Clayton Hensley is in 6th grade. He has more referrals and visits to Principal Kelling's office than anyone else in the history of the school aside from his older brother, Mitchell. Clay finds pride in his behavior and is excited to share with his brother his latest disruptive deeds- drawing a portrait of his principal, as a jackass, in art class. But, when Mitchell returns home from jail changed, it makes Clay reconsider his actions. This story, Troublemaker, tells in third person Clay's struggles of making good choices and the consequences of having a reputation of being a troublemaker. Author Andrew Clements writing style flows easily and honestly portrays the realities of life in middle school for some children. This story will peak and keep the interest of many readers and cause one to reflect on their own actions. Readers need to be aware that the word "jackass" is used derogatorily.Age Appropriate: 5th to 8th grade
  • (4/5)
    From the inside flap:“Once a troublemaker, always a troublemaker?There’s a folder in Principal Kelling’s office that’s as thick as a phone book, and it’s growing daily. It’s filled with the incident reports for every time Clayton Hensley broke the rules. There’s the minor stuff, like running in the hallways and not being where he was supposed to be when he was supposed to be there. But then there are also reports, like the most recent addition, that show Clay’s own brand of troublemaking: The art teacher had said tha the class should spend the period drawing anything they wanted, and Clay decided to be extra “creative” by drawing a spot-on portrait of Principal Kelling . . . as a donkey.It’s a pretty funny joke, but Clay is coming to realize that the biggest joke all may be on him. When his big brother, Mitchell, gets in some serious trouble, Clay decides to change his own mischief-making ways . . . but he can’t seem to shake his reputation as a troublemaker.”Clay is one of those students “who is not living up to his potential.” He idolizes his older brother and wants to follow in his mischievous footsteps. At first I worried that this book might be a “bad influence” by giving kids ideas for making trouble (and it does, but nothing a mischievous child hasn’t already thought of). But it also sets a good, if someone simplistic example. Clay’s admiration for his older brother Mitch may get him into to trouble in the beginning, but it also puts him on the right path to making better choices.What I liked about the book: It provides a good message in simple and humorous terms. The writing is typical Clements and will appeal to students and educators alike. Mark Elliott’s illustrations have a feel as though they were done by a talented student, which will have great appeal for readers.What I don’t like about the story: The message is a little oversimplified. Though I think the simplicity of the story makes it perfect for its targeted audience it might also give the impression that changing one’s behavior can happen virtually overnight. It has the feel of an “after school special” where everything is solved in a couple of hours.Overall this is a good read and I recommend it for Clements fans and anyone who wants to impart a message about how your choices tend to follow you.Recommended for 3rd grade and up.Mrs. Archer’s rating: 4 of 5
  • (3/5)
    I don't read a lot of books at this level, but I thought this one was pretty good. Easy to follow story, easy to understand moral of the story, and some good illustrations. It says it's for ages 8-12, but it uses the word jackass throughout the story, both to describe a donkey and a person, which I find odd. I'm not one for censorship at all, but I think it's weird for an 8 year old to be reading a book where the principal of the middle school is referred to as a jackass.
  • (3/5)
    Clay is a troublemaker. He doesn't pull pranks to be mean or because he's angry, but because his older brother was a prankster and Clay's following in his footsteps. In fact, when Clay uses his time in art class to create a hilarious picture of the school's principal as a jackass, he can't wait to show Mitch and tell him the story of what happened. But Mitch is, for the first time, unimpressed by Clay's prank. Just home from a 30-day jail sentence, Mitch knows it's time for him and Clay to turn their acts around. Mitch makes Clay promise not to pull any more pranks and to start working harder in school. But when someone vandalizes the principal's house on Halloween, all fingers point to Clay. Can he prove his innocence? While I like the subject of this book, it's not one of my favorites of Clements'. The whole story is slight and quick and wraps up way too easily. Clay barely has any trouble switching gears and I found the pat ending a bit hard to buy. This might make an excellent choice for certain spirited children who might be heading down a bad path (or driving you crazy). Its slim page count will up the appeal for reluctant or high-low readers, but otherwise I'd skip it and pick up Frindle, No Talking, The School Story, or The Last Holiday Concert (my favorites).