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Edwina, The Dinosaur Who Didn't Know She Was Extinct

Edwina, The Dinosaur Who Didn't Know She Was Extinct

Escrito por Mo Willems

Narrado por Cher Willems


Edwina, The Dinosaur Who Didn't Know She Was Extinct

Escrito por Mo Willems

Narrado por Cher Willems

avaliações:
4.5/5 (27 avaliações)
Comprimento:
7 minutos
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9780545632744
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

Everyone loves Edwina, except the class know-it-all, who tries to convince the others that dinosaurs are extinct. Edwina is shocked! Children will have fun searching the art for hidden pictures of Pigeon and Knuffle Bunny.
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9780545632744
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor


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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Edwina, The Dinosaur Who Didn't Know She Was Extinct

4.3
27 avaliações / 17 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (3/5)
    Edwina is a friendly dinosaur well loved by everyone in town, with one exception -- a little boy who is very upset that no one will listen to his school report on how dinosaurs are extinct. He eventually finds a sympathetic ear in an unlikely source...Usually I love Mo Williams's books, but this one was a bit odd. The whole conceit is bizarre -- let's remind kids that dinosaurs are actually extinct while simultaneously telling them that's a live dinosaur going about baking cookies for everyone. It seems like too much of a stretch of the imagination, even for children's literature. But that being said, I shared this book with my 5-year-old niece who just loved it and asked to read it over and over again. And I do like the plot of a boy who is angrily set in his ways being won over by kindness. Not my favorite from Williams, but a decent offering.
  • (4/5)
    I like Edwina because it is funny how she dosen't know she was suppose to be exint. Edwina is really nice and helpful and very funny. I hope you like the book Edwina. ( Kaito & Mya Grade 4)Very funny book.(Elise)
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a dinosaur that is oblivious to the fact that dinosaurs are extinct. It's not until a boy in her class tries to expose the elephant in the room. Edwina shows her true kindness by being the only thing to listen to the boy. Eventually, she realizes she's extinct but doesn't care at all.
  • (3/5)
    Edwina, the neighbourhood dinosaur is everyone's friend. She bakes amazing cookies but Reginald is bothered that no one seems to notice that dinosaurs are extinct. A funny story with great illustrations that enhance the humor of the story. I especially enjoyed after Reginald's carefully constructed argument about the extinction of dinosaurs that no one cares, not even the teacher. Instead they enjoy Edwina's cookies in the schoolyard. A lighthearted book recommended for early primary students to have read to them or to begin transitioning to independent reading.
  • (2/5)
    Gosh. I wonder what I'm missing. Imo, Mo Willems failed, for once. Well, I guess some would find it funny. But I'm not alone, judging by the condition & availability of this book at my library.
  • (4/5)
    The genre of this book is modern fantasy. Edwina is a dinosaur who doesnt know that she is the onky dinosaur left that is not extinct. A boy tries his best to convince everyone that she is, in fact, extinct, until he meets Edwina. Then everything changes. This book would be appropriate for 1st-graders.
  • (4/5)
    I cannot tell you how hilarious I find it that this adorable picture-book by Mo Willems - author of the Caldecott Honor Book Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus - has aroused the ire of the fundamentalist pseudo-science crowd, who perceive, in its tale of a young boy who refuses to trust the evidence of his own eyes, when it contradicts something he already believes, an attack on science, and an argument for behavioral conformity.Yes. Because, the argument runs, Reginald von Hoobie-Doobie (great name, Mo Willems!) stops brow-beating the other members of his community, ceases to protest (protest!) at the very existence of another, and begins to act like a human being (one who eats chocolate-chip cookies), he must therefore have imbibed the "opiate of the masses." Don't believe me? Check out the amazon review that sneers at Edwina's "cliched" niceness, and maintains that the message here is that research and protest are a silly means of trying to correct the common knowledge, and buck the "status quo." Or the review which claims that Willems is promoting a "corrupted thought process" in which popular belief is preferable to scientific fact.Well then, here are the facts: In this story, a young man finds that the reality of the world around him does not conform to the received wisdom contained in his books - a source he is predisposed to trust. Rather than precipitating a period of further investigation - an effort to reconcile new evidence with existing theory - this contradiction leads our hero into a frantic effort to shore up what he already believes (that dinosaurs are extinct), and to convince those around him to believe the same. The fact that this belief runs counter to the lived experience of all, in the form of their daily interaction with Edwina, is precisely the point, and the source of the humor that seems to have escaped the reviewers mentioned above. In one hysterical scene, Reginald actually parades around with a sign that reads "This is not happening!"Of course, there is also an emotional component to this story, and I could see someone coming away from it with the idea that Willems' is offering an affirmation of the importance of feeling, as a way of understanding the world. But the irony, of course, of the criticism leveled at Edwina, the Dinosaur Who Didn't Know She Was Extinct, is that its protagonist displays many of those characteristics which are (rightly) decried in the religious zealot: an insistence on the "book" as an authority on reality, to the exclusion of new evidence (think creationism); an intolerance for the views of others, and belief that it is given to us to "enlighten" them (think proselytizing missionary work); and a deeply-felt sense of affront, that the existence of others contradicts the "right" way of being (think homophobia).Willems' crime isn't that he's anti-science, it's that he demonstrates how scientists and researchers can be anti-science. And he does it with humor! Lord, how I love the subversive potential of children's literature! How I love Mo Willems!
  • (5/5)
    Willems writes another book that shows friendship despite differences. A young boy finally realizes that he has found a friend and doesn't care anymore that she is supposed to be extinct.
  • (5/5)
    Edwina is the town dinosaur who loves to bake chocolate chip cookies and help out the townsfolk. Everyone is happy to have her as a friend except Reginald. He is determined to convince anyone who will listen that Edwina is extinct. He may be amazed at what HE learns when he educates Edwina about her situation.
  • (3/5)
    I think this book is just a cute story. There is a dinosaur who lives in town and does nice things for all the humans. One child, however, does not like her presence because he knows that dinosaurs are extinct, and therefore, she shouldn't be there. The story does have a good message about people needing to feel as though they are being heard, even when you don't agree with what they are saying.
  • (3/5)
    The best part: saying Von Hoobie Doobie
  • (4/5)
    fun story. Kids will enjoy it.
  • (3/5)
    This is the story of Edwina, the cookie-baking dinosaur, who is friends with all of the neighborhood children except for Reginald, who dislikes Edwina because he knows that dinosaurs are extinct. After Reginald explains extinction to Edwina, she decides that she doesn't care that she's supposed to be extinct and Reginald decides that he doesn't care, either. They go back to Edwina's and she bakes cookies for her new friend, Reginald.This picture book is not terribly compelling and, considering Mo Willems' other work, relatively disappointing. The illustrations are somewhat more detailed than his other books, but the muted colors contribute to this book's dull tone. The plot is also problematic because it fails to address its main question: if dinosaurs are extinct, then how does Edwina exist? By writing the answer to this question off with Edwina's simple decision not to care that other dinosaurs extinct, the author avoids any real resolution. Furthermore, readers are never entirely sure why Reginald resists Edwina so much in the first place. The style of the book is interesting, with text and illustrations in different places on each page. The author also makes good use of blank space (not white, but blank) on the pages. Also, names like "Edwina" and "Reginald von Hoobie Doobie" (reminiscent of Dr. Seuss' character names) are sure to appeal to young readers.Recommended for elementary school libraries (because of the author's popularity)
  • (4/5)
    Pretty good, happy ending, humorous, good for lower elementary kids
  • (5/5)
    Edwina is a dinosaur living in today's world that is friends with everyone except for Reginald who knows everything and knows that Edwina is extinct. The plot is great for a young reader, it's easy to follow and holds the readers attention. Edwina and Reginald are well developed through the pictures and the text. The setting is contained within the illustrations that are simplistic and colorful. This book would be great for a public library for beginning readers to have read to them, or to read with a parent.
  • (4/5)
    After reading this book in storytime several times, I caved and bought us a copy.Having our own copy makes all the difference, of course. We can play "find the pigeon" and "what's cool about the inside covers" and likewise :)The actual content of the book is great too, all about a know-it-all who wants to ignore what is right in front of his eyes because it contrasts with what he thinks he knows. Of course he learns about friendship and so on, nothing new there, good solid moral told with some understated humor.Honestly, I'm not being very convincing, but it *is* a good book.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful use of humor and imagination in the text and illustration. Expressive characters and exaggerated emotion keep the action moving, and sends a message to never be limited by labels or expectations.