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That Book Woman

That Book Woman

Escrito por Heather Henson

Narrado por Walker Harrison


That Book Woman

Escrito por Heather Henson

Narrado por Walker Harrison

avaliações:
4.5/5 (18 avaliações)
Comprimento:
9 minutos
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9780545467520
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

Cal is not the reading type, but that book woman keeps visiting. This is the moving story of the Pack Horse Librarians, whose bravery and commitment helped rural children find something wonderful in books.
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9780545467520
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Heather Henson lives on a farm in Kentucky with her husband and three children, is the managing director of the Pioneer Playhouse, and is the author of several critically acclaimed picture books and novels, including Dream of Night, The Whole Sky, and the Christopher Award–winning That Book Woman.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre That Book Woman

4.3
18 avaliações / 19 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    Great children's book set in 1930s Appalachian Kentucky. A woman employed by the Works Progress Administration's Pack Horse Librarian initiative delivers books every two weeks to a family. Over the winter a child previously uninterested in books and reading asks his sister to teach him to read. The illustrations reflect the simplicity of that earlier time period.
  • (5/5)
    The story follows a farming family that lives very secluded area. The son has a distaste for reading and judges his sister for loving it so much. The book woman rides her horse from far places in terrible weather to bring his sister books. This sparks his interest and he begins to love reading too.
  • (3/5)
    Realistic fiction. It's about a family that lives way up high in the Appalachian Mountains. They have a son named Cal who is the oldest and spends his day helping his father out on the farm. He sister on the other hand spends all day reading books. Cal doesn't understand why she reads so much he hates it, all he sees on a page is a bunch of chicken scratch. One day there is a lady that shows up to their house on a horse with a bag full of books. The lady says that every two weeks she will come back with new books to trade for the old ones. Cal finally decides to ask his sister to help him read, she dose and now he spends all day reading while his younger siblings help on the farm.
  • (4/5)
    I'd never heard of pack horse librarians, so I found this story charming! Part of this story's delight is how the boy changes his mind about books and asks his sister to teach him how to read. The ilustrations are lovely, to boot!
  • (4/5)
    This delightful picture-book, told from the perspective of Cal, a young Appalachian boy with no use for the "chicken scratch" to be found in books, is a celebration of the Pack Horse Librarians of the 1930s, who rode out in every kind of weather to bring their precious "treasure" to the people of remote areas of the country. High up on a mountain, Cal and his family eke out a living, with no money for luxuries like books, and little chance for a formal education, with the closest school a "jillion" miles down the creek. But every week, That Book Woman rides up regardless, bringing new titles for Cal's sister Lark, "the readenest child you ever did see." As Cal, scornful at first, observes the Book Woman's courage and determination, he begins to wonder if books might not be worthwhile after all...Written in a dialect that feels authentic, rather than overdone, That Book Woman offers a convincing portrait of a young man's gradual awakening to the value of reading. Cal's resentment at the beginning of the story - captured in both word and image - feels very real, making his eventual transformation all the more satisfying. The artwork by David Small - done in ink, watercolor and pastel chalk - is understated but expressive. All in all, a wonderful picture-book to share with young bibliophiles and library-lovers!
  • (4/5)
    This book is for 2nd through 4th grade and teaches that anyone can enjoy reading, Cal is a boy who works on the farm with his dad and does not read. In the beginning he scowls at his sister for always reading because that is all she ever does. Then one day when he was wondering why this woman risked her health to bring his sister books that she always reads. He asks her to teach him what that "chicken scratch" meant. He learned to love to read and by the time the woman visited again he read to her. This book is based on the traveling librarians of the Appalachian mountains who would deliver books to those who weren't near a library.
  • (5/5)
    Cal hates to read but he always see a lady reading. He gets annoyed because everywhere he goes shes is there. This is a good book to share with students because it can teach them the value and importance of a book.
  • (4/5)
    I love reading about the packhorse librarians! What great women they were to travel on horseback in all kinds of weather to deliver books to the poor people of the Appalachian mountains. This story was particularly touching because we don't only get the story of the librarian, we get to see the difference these librarians made in the lives of their patrons.My only problem with the book is the use of the appalachian dialect. I live in the mountains of Southwest Virginia so I hear and speak it every day. It feels a little over exaggerated to me...like the author was trying to force the language to make the point that the speech is different here. There were some words that I had never heard. Needless to say, it was a little difficult to read this aloud to my daughter.This book is definitely worth reading but have a southern friend handy to translate! :)
  • (5/5)
    I really liked this book but I think it is because I have a personal connection. My grandpa grew up in rural Kentucky in the 1930s, I only wish he was still here so that I could ask if he remembers pack horse librarians. The Appalacian dialect is used to create a sense of place and time for this story. This book could be used for a library program that celebrates librarians and the work that they have done. It could introduce children to the many kinds of lirbarians.
  • (5/5)
    This book made me cry. It was very inspiring. Beautiful language and wonderful illustrations by David Small.
  • (3/5)
    Love the story...not too compelling for children.
  • (4/5)
    That Book Woman by heather Henson, A 40 page child's picture book about the Pack Horse Librarians of Kentucky during the 1930's formed by WPA to bring books, printed resources to the isolated areas where there were few schools and most all citizens lived in abject poverty working hard for a roof over their heads and simple and gathered food for their stomachs. This is the story of young Ca, who by watching the kindness, dedication and sacrifices of their pack horse librarian becomes inspired to learn to read. It is simply but beautifully illustrated and told using a bit of a dialect. It is charming and a great beginning for children to realize the hardships that others endure. It can be used to help motivate literacy while recognizing the service of these women trailblazers. I give it a 4 star rating.
  • (5/5)
    This is a historical fiction book written in rhyme about a boy and his family who live up in the mountains. At first, the boy sees no use to the reading that his sister does. He likens books to "chicken scratch". One day, a woman shows up at their door with a bag full of books. When Pap tries to trade for a book for his sister she refuses and says the books are free. Each week she treks up the mountain on her horse, no matter the weather, until one day the boy wants to see what the fuss is all about.
  • (4/5)
    This story was also in our Engage New York ELA curriculum. It is an eye-opening look at how far people had (and still do have) to go to access books. I liked the fact that this was set in the Appalachian Mountains, in our own country. Too often, children think that everyone lives the way they do, because they are not exposed to real-life in the world around them. This book was a great way to show my students that reading and knowledge hold so much power. They were enthralled to learn that the "Book Woman" would go so far into the mountains, on a horse, through any kind of weather- "just to bring books". They enjoyed the dialect throughout the text as well. It was heartwarming to see the main character's brother change from disinterested to wanting to read and waiting for the book woman.
  • (5/5)
    In this historical fiction book, we are shown a time and place where books and schools were not the number one priority like they are today. The boy continued to be angry that his sister was reading to herself. But when a lady, The Book Woman, came to the house and offered free books for the familly, and every week she will exchange the books for newer ones, the boy grew furious. He didn't understand why she was doing this. When the book lady came every week, he became confused. No matter what the weather was like (super stormy, snowy, rainy, hot), the book woman kept bringing them books. So he decided to ask his sister what the big fuss was about the books, an he asked her to teach him how to read. The next time the book woman came, their mother gave the woman her recipe for berry pie as a gift for making 2 readers in the family. The boy went to the lady and said he wished he could give her a gift as well. But when the lady asked him to read, and he did, she said that was gift enough with a huge smile on her face.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a historical fiction about a boy in the Appalachian mountains who can't understand his sister who loves to read, and then, along comes the book lady on her horse through all weather to exchange free books. It's a great book about the importance of literacy. Perhaps I could use it as an introduction book. I would caution, though, that the book is chock full of incorrect grammar and spelling and may not be the best for read-aloud.
  • (5/5)
    This book was all about the women who used to deliver books in the Appalachians on horseback through all different types of weather. I found this book to be inspirational, by sharing all about the women and their determination to have literature reach the hands of people who wouldn't normally be able to read books. In one part the boy talks of his anger towards his father for trying to trade their goods for the books, but his curiosity is spiked when he finds that they are free. The book woman will not take anything for the books for his sister, but will return in two weeks to deliver more and take those back. He wonders what would bring a woman that far in all sorts of weather just to bring books to people. In the end you see one sister who loves to read teach her brother how to read and the love of a good book.
  • (4/5)
    Told in the vernacular style of Appalachia, this book illumnated a group of librarians from history that I was completely unaware of. I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone who has the time and the patience to read and comprehend it. It was very well told.
  • (4/5)
    Booklist - Cal describes his way-up mountain home—“So high / we hardly sight / a soul”—but that changes when the Book Woman, a traveling librarian, rides up to the house. The Book Woman is a boon for Cal’s sister, Lark, “the readenest child you ever did see,” but no use to Cal, who is not “born / to sit so stoney-still / a-starin at some chicken scratch.” However, he is impressed by the librarian, who rides in all weather; finally, he asks Lark to teach him to read. This tribute to the Pack Horse Librarians of Appalachia has a lyric, simple style that lends itself to reading aloud. Henson, a Kentucky native, creates a reliable narrator in Cal, whose journey to reading is gentle and believable. There are a couple of stereotypes here (Mother is pregnant and barefoot), but overall, the mixed-media illustrations (ink, watercolor, pastel) support the text’s genial flow. Mountains and sky achieve a lofty spaciousness that makes the Book Woman’s ride even more impressive. An author’s note gives background on the WPA’s Pack Horse Librarian program.