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Elizabeth I: Red Rose of the House of Tudor, England, 1544

Elizabeth I: Red Rose of the House of Tudor, England, 1544

Escrito por Kathryn Lasky

Narrado por Josephine Bailey


Elizabeth I: Red Rose of the House of Tudor, England, 1544

Escrito por Kathryn Lasky

Narrado por Josephine Bailey

avaliações:
4.5/5 (21 avaliações)
Comprimento:
4 horas
Editora:
Lançado em:
Jan 10, 2005
ISBN:
9781400171354
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

Welcome to the bizarre court of Henry VIII, where even a princess fears losing her head like her mother. Elizabeth hides her tenacious personality from everyone, especially her father. Your 21st-century kid will enjoy Elizabeth's "treasonous thoughts" and glimpse the daily life of a young woman who ascended the throne at 25 and went on to rule her country for 45 years.

Editora:
Lançado em:
Jan 10, 2005
ISBN:
9781400171354
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Kathryn Lasky is a New York Times bestselling author of many children’s and young adult books, which include her Tangled in Time series; her bestselling series Guardians of Ga’Hoole, which was made into the Warner Bros. movie Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole; and her picture book Sugaring Time, awarded a Newbery Honor. She has twice won the National Jewish Book Award, for her novel The Night Journey and her picture book Marven of the Great North Woods. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her husband. www.kathrynlasky.com

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Elizabeth I

4.3
21 avaliações / 15 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    Written as the diary of Princess Elizabeth, about her life in Henry VIII's court with his 6th wife and her half-sister, Mary. A great series for young girls!One feature of the Royal Diaries series is once the story is finished, the author includes a section which is only facts: pictures/portraits of the main characters, family trees, a "What life was like in (insert name) lived" to help the reader distinguish between what we know about the characters, what we assume from artifacts found, and what the author made up to help the story along.
  • (4/5)
    Written as the diary of Princess Elizabeth, about her life in Henry VIII's court with his 6th wife and her half-sister, Mary. A great series for young girls!One feature of the Royal Diaries series is once the story is finished, the author includes a section which is only facts: pictures/portraits of the main characters, family trees, a "What life was like in (insert name) lived" to help the reader distinguish between what we know about the characters, what we assume from artifacts found, and what the author made up to help the story along.
  • (3/5)
    Suitable for the target demographic (teen girls). Although, so far as I can tell, the historical events are accurate, and the author has not taken a noticeably anachronistic viewpoint, nonetheless this is a fictional work that attempts to tell Elizabeth's story in the first person, which necessarily involves supposition and interpolation of knowledge she might not have had at the time. I am not a fan of "diary novels", as too much outside information is lost or improbably shoe-horned in, but this one is okay.
  • (2/5)
    Reviewed April 2000 What fun this book was to read. Lasky tells the story of Elizabeth's life during the last years of Henry VIII's life, through the eyes and ears of his daughter. Her talent for details of everyday life were wonderful..."taking a bath every 3 weeks, combing nits out of your hair." Gross! I could just sell the vomit and crap whose smells forced the court to move on. Everything written was factual as far as is known, I think the relationship with Robin Dudley was a bit over exaggerated, but the rest seemed well researched. Her adoration for her father was so childlike, even though she knew he had her mother killed. I liked that the author has Elizabeth visit her mother's grave and learn all the details of the beheading. A really good line was when Elizabeth says that if the sun doesn't go around the earth then England isn't the center of the universe, then her father might be upset. Wonderful! This book is written for a young female adult but I learned plenty. Can't wait to start the other two "diaries" I picked up as well.
  • (5/5)
    i loved this book gave me a whole new perspective of a bastard sh had to strive for her fathers love and she got it a couple of times it is before Catherine Parr married Thomas Seymour
  • (4/5)
    Written as the diary of Princess Elizabeth, about her life in Henry VIII's court with his 6th wife and her half-sister, Mary. A great series for young girls!One feature of the Royal Diaries series is once the story is finished, the author includes a section which is only facts: pictures/portraits of the main characters, family trees, a "What life was like in (insert name) lived" to help the reader distinguish between what we know about the characters, what we assume from artifacts found, and what the author made up to help the story along.
  • (3/5)
    This pretend diary of Queen Elizabeth I gives us a peek into her young life and its many tribulations. Elizabeth enjoys herself considerably when at court, but when exiled from her father is miserable. Her bright and interesting personality shows through even in this fictional account of her childhood.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful book about Elizabeth I from a wonderful author.c.
  • (3/5)
    This book was not completely historically correct, and did not follow, in my mind, what we know of Elizabeth as a person. A bit to feminist, which Elizabeth most certainly wasn't, knowing the culture at that time.
  • (5/5)
    very well done enjoyed very much love to read history
  • (5/5)
    The Diary of Elizabeth I. She is a young princess. Daughter of King Henry VIII (not exactly the best of kings...) and Anne Boleyn, (beheaded for not being able to bear any boys.) Woah!) Elizabeth yearns for her father’s love, and treasures every wink and pinch on the cheek, more than any jewels. She is greatly disliked by her older sister Mary, but great chums with her younger brother, Edward. Her story is a pretty unique one. Never knowing when she could be banished to another castle. Or worse. When her sister could be “nice” or perfectly horrid. Or her father be kind and loving, or be stern and mean. Yes I certainly don’t envy her. But also must say she had a lot of spunk. In all I must say the diary was very good, and is now one of my favorites!! It was very fascinating and interesting. 5stars !!!
  • (4/5)
    This was a reread for me. I believe I originally read this book sometime during middle school and I remembered that I really liked it. I read a bunch of the Dear America and Royal Diaries books but I would always get them from my school library. Now I’m going to try to buy the ones I liked so I can relive my childhood. Reading this now as an adult is such a different experience, but I still enjoyed it. The author did an amazing job imagining what a young Elizabeth I would be like. There was a nice blend of innocence and tragedy to her character. I also really liked the little tidbits about life at court, like how often they took baths (spoiler alert: it’s not very often). Overall, this is a great middle grade book for kids who want to learn more about Elizabeth I.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this book! It was interesting to see Elizabeth's view on things, on her family, on her country, what was going on at the time. England was a crazy place. And I knew a bit about the Elizabethan era, but this just explained so much more, even if it was a work of fiction. Very well done. 4.5 out of 5 stars.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not really one for stories told through diary entries - I feel like they tend to be very childishly written (perhaps unsurprisingly) - but this was a very good book. This is the book that began my unhealthy obsession with Tudor history. I find history in general fascinating, but the Tudors are like a modern day soap opera - it's spectacular.A truly entertaining read!
  • (5/5)
    The Royal Diaries: Elizabeth I: Red Rose of the House of Tudor by Kathryn LaskyThis historical fiction story is about Queen Elizabeth I. This fictional diary depicts what Elizabeth’s pre teen and early teenage thoughts were about her life and family. Elizabeth fears of her father beheading her because he beheaded her mother. King Henry IIIV a man that cannot keep on woman for long and had no use for another daughter. Elizabeth believes she may someday become Queen even though her father has a desire for a male heir. Will it happen and if it does how will she rule?I love this story because it gives insight into what Elizabeth might have thought being a young lady. I must say I do not envy the danger she was in at times for being heir to the throne. I wonder what I would have done if I was in her shoes.I would use this book with 2nd through 6th grade students. I would use this to discuss some of Europe’s most promonient monarchies. I would recommend this book to the student’s assigned with getting some insight into who Elizabeth I was.