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Dear Mrs. LaRue: Letters from Obedience School

Dear Mrs. LaRue: Letters from Obedience School

Escrito por Mark Teague

Narrado por David de Vries


Dear Mrs. LaRue: Letters from Obedience School

Escrito por Mark Teague

Narrado por David de Vries

avaliações:
4.5/5 (30 avaliações)
Comprimento:
13 minutos
Lançado em:
May 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780545422369
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

When Ike Larue is "imprisoned" at the Igor Brotweiler Canine Academy, he tries everything to get sent home--weepy letters to his owner, even illness. In reality, Brotweiler is more like camp than prison, but still, Ike's not cut out for life without Mrs. Larue & his creature comforts. Finally, he runs away only to find himself back in Snort City--just in time to save Mrs. Larue's life.
Lançado em:
May 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780545422369
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor


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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Dear Mrs. LaRue

4.5
30 avaliações / 21 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    This is a very amusing picture book that I enjoyed reading aloud. The clever illustrations show the reality of Ike’s life at the canine academy versus what he’s describing in his letters to Mrs. LaRue. Using only grayscale for Ike's false descriptions in the letters helps young readers separate fact from fiction.
  • (4/5)
    Hilarious! The dog works hard to persuade his owner that he is just right the way he is.

    Lexile: 500
  • (5/5)
    Dear Mrs. LaRue is an extremely funny story about Ike a dog who's been sent off to obedience school. Ike has done some extremely mischievous things, and it seems that everyone else is to blame except him. Ike, loves to stretch the truth. While in obedience school, he'll do anything for his owner to reconsider and let him come home. So Ike writes her and tells her of how awful it is there and that he's planning to escape. As you read this book pay close attention to the illustrations. The illustrations shows the truth versus Ike's reality. Enjoy reading this story!
  • (4/5)
    Teague, M. (2002). Dear Mrs. LaRue: Letters from Obedience School. New York: Scholastic Press.0439206634Appetizer: Ike LaRue, a dog, has been sentenced to go to obedience school for two months after proving to be a bit of a trouble maker at home. Ike shares his worst daydreams about what is happening at the Igor Brotweiler Canine Academy to Mrs. LaRue through the letters he writes home. Growing frustrated with his situation and Mrs. LaRue's refusal to help, Ike decides to attempt a daring escape.To balance and contrast Ike's letters, excerpts from newspapers are also included reporting on why Ike was imprisoned. This also draws out more parallels to positioning Ike as a criminal.Ike's imaginings of being taken to a scary school building, dragged off by prison guards, etc. are all shown in black and white and include humorous touches to prevent the imagery from becoming too upsetting or scary. Also, preventing the imagined events from being upsetting is the fact that the readers are shown--in bright colors--what Ike's real school experiences are like (let's just say pats on the head and doggie treats are not denied). Readers will like how imaginative Ike is.It's also worth noting that there are some difficult vocabulary words throughout the text--they're not only difficult for first and second graders, but for fourth and fifth graders as well. Terms like "melodramatic" and "hypochondriac" are included, which could become brief teaching moments. A teacher, on the second or third time sharing the book with students, could also explain the historical significance of "I like Ike."Dinner Conversation:"Dear Mrs. LaRue,How could you do this to me? This is a PRISON, not a school! You should see the other dogs. They are BAD DOGS, Mrs. LaRue! I do not fit in.""Day after day I'm forced to perform the most meaningless tasks. Today it was "sit" and "roll over," all day long.""Finally, I had to be taken to the vet. Dr. Wilfrey claims that he can't find anything wrong with me, but I am certain I have an awful disease. I must come home at once.Honestly yours,Ike""By the time you read this I will be gone. I have decided to attempt a daring escape. I'm sorry it has come to this, since I am really a very good dog, but frankly you left me no choice.""So I have decided to return home. You may try to lock me up again, but that is a risk I must take. And frankly, even more than myself, I worry about you. You may not know it, Mrs. LaRue, but you need a dog!"To Go with the Meal:This picturebook could also be used in a lesson on letter (or email!) writing. A teacher could go into how to open and close a letter. Plus, since there's a huge difference between Ike's black and white imaginings of what the obedience school is like and the sunny reality, a teacher could discuss the books in terms of it having an unreliable narrator. With younger students this will almost certainly turn to a discussion of trust and how wrong lying is.This would also be a great read for students nervous to go off to school or summer camp for the first time. And the idea of using Dear Mrs. LaRue for that purpose has special meaning for me. My first letters home to my parents from a girl scouts summer camp when I was 7 said something to the effect of "I hate it here. Come and get me now!!!!!!!" Clearly, I found Ike's experiences and voice to be relatable. I also like this picturebook because the story begins with a newspaper article about Ike's sentencing. From the wording and incidents described, the reader may conclude that Ike is a bad dog. But as the letters are being written, the reader is shown Ike's reasonings for his past and current actions.In terms of this book being about the experience of going to school, it shows the real teachers as supportive and encouraging even during assignments that Ike doesn't see the purpose of completing. But a student will understand why it's good for a dog to be able to sit. So, by extension, this can be a lesson on why it's still important for kids to do their lessons, even when they don't always immediately see the point.Tasty Rating: !!!!
  • (5/5)
    The illustrations in this book are hysterical. Ike is sent to obedience school by his owner Mrs. La Rue. His letters trying to persuade Mrs. LaRue to come and rescue him from a supposedly horrible place are so imaginative and funny. I laughed throughout the entire book.
  • (5/5)
    This hilarious book is fun for all ages. Make sure the illustrations are clearly visible, as they show so much of the dissonance between the dog's thinking and reality. Great for persuasive writing, voice and irony.
  • (5/5)
    Ike, the misunderstood dog, has managed to get himself into more trouble than he can handle. When Mrs. LaRue finally gets enough of his bad doggy behavior, she ships him off to obedience school. Ike writes home every day trying to make her realize how important it is for him to come home. Finally, he escapes the school and arrives just in time to save Mrs. LaRue from being hit by a truck. This is a wonderful story that brings laughter from children and adults alike. The illustrations show just what Ike thinks about his time at the obedience school and how wants to be home.I thought this book was absolutely adorable. Ike reminds me of my own dogs, constantly in trouble but it's just a big misunderstanding. All of the kids I have read this book with have liked it as well.I think it would be a good book to use with letter writing skills. It would make a writing lesson more enjoyable for students who aren't very excited about writing. I think it would be fun to put the kids in groups and let them work together to write letters to Ike from Mrs. LaRue.
  • (4/5)
    A book that has a kind of inside joke for readers. The text tells one story while the pictures tell another. Very fun and funny.This could be used to teach about lying and perhaps about writing and illustrating books.
  • (4/5)
    This was a cute story. I enjoyed the sly sense of humor although my daughter who is almost seven did not really get the sense of humor at all and didn't even want to finish this story. I also enjoyed the irony. I would use this book in second or third grade to illustrate multiple points of view.
  • (5/5)
    A fun book in which a wire fox terrier, Ike La Rue, is sent to obedience school after ruining Mrs. La Rue's coat. Ike writes letters home detailing the horrible conditions at the school. Color pictures juxtapose reality with Ike's melodramatic descriptions. Fun, fun, fun.
  • (4/5)
    Ike LaRue is a misunderstood dog, incredibly loyal and brave he is being sent off to obedience school because he accidentally ripped Mrs. LaRue favorite coat. Read what happens to him at Brotweiler Academy.
  • (4/5)
    A funny story that shows letter writing. It is also good to teach character analysis.
  • (4/5)
    Love Ike's imagination (the black&white scenes of misery). Love all the details of the reality, the good life he's actually living (for example, read the dinner menu). I admit I don't understand an early scene, about neighbor cats on a fire escape... what's the reality there? Pretty darn cute, especially if you know a clever, manipulative dog.
  • (5/5)
    So many things to love about this book: the humor, the format (multi-genre: letters & articles) the dual illustrations that tell both sides of the story. Happy to place this one on my PB shelves.
  • (5/5)
    For me, this book is invaluable to students because in our age of modern technology, we have somehow lost personal connections like letter writing and this helps students rediscover that and the joy of it in a hilarious way.
  • (5/5)
    This is a book about a dog that was sent to obedience school and was writing letters to his owner trying to persuade her to let him come back. This is a very funny book based on the point of view. This story is being told by a dog and I have always wondered about what my dog would say if he could talk and this story gives us a little look into what the dog might say. Based on the title it drew me in and made me want to read it. This was a very well put together book. Throughout the book there were many humorous characteristics. The book showed the different view points, one is what is actually happening and what Ike says is happening. For example, when he was talking about how sick he was in the hospital he made it seem as if he felt horrible and being taken out of the obedience school on a stretcher but we see him sitting in a hospital bed fine. This shows that he was trying to play on the emotions of his owner. I think that this books was well put together for a child with the different components. Another important feature of the book that was very engaging were the pictures. The pictures were very detailed and engaging. The illustrator put a lot of time and effort into them. Every detailed that was talked about in the text was shown in the picture. This book although humorous and fiction, it can be used in a classroom to create a lesson. If students are drawn to a book they will be able to understand it more and be able to apply it to a comprehension lesson. I also liked how at the end of the book Ike rescued his owner which showed that he has some positive characteristics to him as well.
  • (5/5)
    I really loved reading the story "Dear Mrs. LaRue" because of many reasons, but two aspects especially stuck out. Through the creative use of first person point of view and successful character development of Ike the dog, I enjoyed this story whose big idea was that you have to deal with the consequences of your actions. First off, the story was told through letters home from Ike to his owner while at obedience school, which made this book stand apart from many other children's books. Although we only saw his point of view in his letters, Ike gave a detailed account of his adventure, which made the story very fun to read, such as when he describes life right after his prison break to his owner as him "continuing to suffer horribly as I roam this barren wasteland." Second, the author's development of the main character Ike was thorough so his personality and emotions strongly came through to the reader. This is shown well as Ike describes his shocked, stubborn, and dramatic reaction to the guards at school telling him to sit still and be a good dog. I highly recommend this exciting account of Ike's time at obedience school because it was such a fun read!
  • (5/5)
    A book about a dog that is sent to training school and writes his owner throughout his stay in an attempt to convince her to let him come home. Eventually he escapes and comes home just in time to rescue her. The story is told with newspaper articles and letters. This is a great book for teaching the basic part of a friendly letter, persuasive writing or a news article/report.
  • (5/5)
    This is a cute story about a dog getting sent to obedience school and writing home to his mom/owner. He keeps writing about how terrible it is, but as you can see by the illustrations it is actually very nice so really he is just homesick. I like this book a lot because it is silly and I like dogs a lot. It is a series and I will probably share with you one or two more.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this story for several reasons. I truly loved the illustrations in the book. My favorite part of the illustrations is that they contrast Ike’s point of view of what is happening and what is actually happening. For example, when he is feeling ill and has to be taken to the vet his point of view is that is dark and prison like when in actuality he is laying in a comfy bed in a room with a large window. The contrasts shown in the illustrations guide the reader to see the different points of view within the story. Another aspect of the story I enjoyed was the writing style. The author wrote the story as Ike, the dog, and writing letters to his owner, Mrs. LaRue, while he is in obedience school. These letters also highlight the differences in point of view throughout the story. For instance, Mrs. LaRue is extremely upset when Ike ate her chicken pie but in Ike’s letter to her he questions why she simply didn’t have a discussion with him about it. He does not agree that him eating the chicken pie is a big deal whereas Mrs. LaRue sees it as an issue. Finally, I like the plot of the story. One of the reasons Mrs. LaRue sends Ike to obedience school is because he tore her favorite camel’s hair coat. However after escaping from obedience school Ike returns to his home to save Mrs. LaRue from being hit by a car and the only thing that is harmed is her new camel’s hair coat. I like that the story comes full circle and that Mrs. LaRue sees that there are things more important than her coat. The big idea/message of this story is to appreciate those around you and forgive them for their mistakes.
  • (4/5)
    Mrs. LaRue sends his dog Ike to an obedience school. Ike hates it there and sends letters to Mr. LaRue with the hope of Mrs. LaRue coming and taking him to back home. Mrs. LaRue does not reply to his letters and Ike runs away from the obedience school. After wondering alone, he decides to come back home. His timing could not be better. He saves Mrs. LaRue’s life, becomes a hero, and goes back home with Mrs. LaRue.