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Ish

Ish

Escrito por Peter Reynolds

Narrado por Chester Gregory


Ish

Escrito por Peter Reynolds

Narrado por Chester Gregory

avaliações:
4.5/5 (41 avaliações)
Comprimento:
6 minutos
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2005
ISBN:
9780545749305
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

With a little encouragement from his sister, Ramon discovers that creativity is about a lot more than getting things just "right."
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2005
ISBN:
9780545749305
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Peter Reynolds, coauthor of Dramatic Events, is head of the Department of Drama and Theater Studies at Roehampton Institute London.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Ish

4.6
41 avaliações / 59 Análises
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Classificação: 0 de 5 estrelas

Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    Ramon is a boy who enjoys drawing but then is discouraged because he doesn't think his drawings are just right. His whole outlook is changed when he finds out his sister keeps all his drawings and hangs them on her wall and tells him that they look related to what they should be but different. This is a good realistic fiction because Ramon and his family are made up but also his story is realistic. I would use this for primary and intermediate. Watercolor and Ink.
  • (5/5)
    excellent!
  • (4/5)
    This book is an awesome way to encourage children to draw and write. It shows that you don't have to be perfect, and how being an encourager can change lives. It is a very positive book and shows character growth.
  • (3/5)
    When Ramon's older brother makes a dismissive comment about one of his drawings, the budding young artist finds that his confidence has been shaken, and that, from then on, nothing he produces seems to look "right." Then one day, his younger sister makes off with one of his crumpled efforts, and - in the process of trying to retrieve it - he discovers that visual verisimilitude is not always necessary. Who cares if his drawing doesn't look exactly like a vase? It looks "vase-ish..."Following upon The Dot - another picture-book that encourages artistic creativity in children - Peter H. Reynolds offers a charming story aimed at reassuring young artists who are doubting their own abilities. The accompanying line drawings, embellished with watercolor, are simple but expressive, capturing the emotion of each scene. I liked the message here - that perfection isn't required to create something worthwhile - and appreciated Reynolds' sensitivity to the fact that young children can be deeply effected by words of encouragement - or discouragement.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic little book! Ish proves that anyone can be artists in their own sense as long as they are confident and proud of what they do. I had a smile on my face the whole time I was reading this.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a little boy named Ramon who really enjoyed drawing but her brother Leon once made fun of one of his drawings. From then on Ramon tried to draw things perfectly but he can never and finally gives up drawing. One day his sister grabbed one of his wadded up pictures and ran to her room. When Ramon got there he realized she had a lot of his crumpled pictures on her wall and she explained that one looked vase..ish. From then on he drew with the ish in mind. Critique (Genre): This is a great example of realistic fiction because so often children are turned off to art because they don't think that their pictures look perfect. We all need those advocates in life like Ramon's sister who is able to tell children that it doesn't need to be perfect. This story could happen in any classroom especially when children begin to get older and realize they aren't "good" at art. Media: Watercolor, ink, and tea.
  • (5/5)
    Ramon loves making art, but his brother Leon made a comment that ruined Ramon's confidence. He loses faith in his ability to make good art until his sister Marisol reminds him that his work is art-"ish" and that nothing he makes need be perfect because it is perfect already.A great book to remind students that people make all kinds of art and think that all kinds of things are beautiful. A wonderful read aloud for those moments when this reminder is needed in the classroom.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! It contains great illustrations and color. This is a story about a boy who thinks his art work is horrible. However, his sister loves his work and opens his eye's to see things as other than perfect.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a boy named Raymond who loved drawing, but one day his brother made a comment saying his drawing looked nothing like the subject. After trying to draw many pictures, he gave up. However, his sister kept collecting his drawings and said they looked something-ish. After his sister's comment, Raymond was inspired to draw more ish-like things.
  • (5/5)
    A boy named Ramon loved to draw and create art. His older sibling however criticized his artwork. He then just about lost all confidence in his ability to draw and make art. His younger sister then comes along and makes Ramon realize that anything can be art and it can all be beautiful works of art.
  • (5/5)
    Ish is about a young boy named Ramon and his siblings. Ramon loves to draw and when he is teased by his older brother, he loses confidence in his artistic abilities. His younger sister shows him that art doesn't have to be perfect and that beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
  • (5/5)
    This is a cute story about a young child that loves to draw. He is trying to make the things he is drawing perfect, but his bother comes and diminishes his confidence. As time went by he tried and tried to be better but he quit. Until one day he realizes his younger sister has been keeping all his work he has throw away in the trash for months. "Ish" is the word you tag onto something you are describing when something doesn't look exactly like what is is suppose to be but looks like it for the most part. At the end he sees the world a whole new way through "ish" eyes and he realizes that he doesn't have to be perfect.
  • (5/5)
    Ramon loves to draw but her brother laughs at her drawings. She posts them in her room and her brother walks in to see them and agrees they are "ish" type of artwork. Ramon continued to draw, draw and draw then labeled her drawings with ish.
  • (5/5)
    Ramon discovers that art and creativity are not always about doing something right. They are more about doing something in your own way.
  • (5/5)
    Great book for those thinking their artwork isn't good enough.
  • (5/5)
    Another beautiful, inspiring tale from Peter H. Reynolds! Like "The Dot," this book will bring confidence to young artists everywhere. The themes are very similar to "The Dot," but the story is different-- Ramon is trying to draw something exactly as it looks, and fails, and gradually realizes that something that looks "real-ish" is good enough-- even awesome! I already use the word (?) "ish" all the time and see myself using it even more after reading this wonderful, adorable book.
  • (5/5)
    Age: Primary, IntermediateMedia: Watercolor, ink, and teaThe genre of this book is realistic fiction. It is realistic fiction because the events in this story could actually happen. There could be a boy like Ramon who draws many different things. The main character in this story is Ramon. He is a deep character because he grows up during the book. At the beginning he gets very frustrated with himself and his inability to draw, but then he realizes that he has talent and he feels much more confident. The theme of this book is to always believe in yourself. Even if you are not extremely talented, find joy in doing things that are special to you, just like Ramon.
  • (4/5)
    This is a story about a boy who loves to draw, but once his brother makes fun of his pictures he decides to stop trying. He soon discovers that his little sister has been collecting his crumpled up, rejected drawings and hanging them on her bedroom walls. He learns that his work can be whatever he wants it to be, it's all in how you look at it.This is very sweet book to read. It reminds you that beauty really is in the eye of the beholder. The illustrations are simple and work with the text very well, they are small pictures until you see his sister's room. It's a great contrast! My children enjoyed reading this book along with me, and I found that this story has a really great message to give to any child! Whatever they create is beautiful, simply because they tried.
  • (5/5)
    much like The Dot (same author) only this one, Ramon is told he can't draw and so he gives up but his sister thinks he's a drawer and he draws things that are similar(ish) to other things. A great read!
  • (5/5)
    Age Appropriateness: PrimaryGenre: Realistic FictionReview: This was a good example of realistic fiction, because in real life kids get put down and feel like quitting.Comments: - Create "ish" artwork books - Discuss how Ramon's brother could have been nicer.Media: Watercolors
  • (4/5)
    This is about a boy Ramon who loved to draw. One day his brother told him his drawings didn't look "right". He was frustrated and after trying to make things look "right", he quit. Just as he did that his sister grabbed his drawing and ran to her room. Ramon followed her and saw all his pictures on her wall like a gallery. There she told him that one of his drawings looked "vase-ish" and from there on he drew freely and drew ish-ly and he was happy. Its cute because a lot of the words in the book to describe Ramon's drawings end with -ish. I liked the moral that things don't have to be perfect but you do have to do your best. The story is short with few words and has nice illustrations. I think this is ideal for 1st graders.
  • (5/5)
    Ramon loved to draw everything. Until, one day his big brother leaned over his shoulder and humiliated him and made fun of his drawings. From that day forth, Ramon had a tough timje finding ideas to draw about. Everything he drew, he eventually crumpled and threw to the side. One day Ramon was about to give up when his little sister Marisol stole a crumpled paper from his pile. He chased her till he got to her room where he discovered a gallery of crumpled art. Here he found the meaning of the word "ish" and created a new world where everthing was ish-like. Finally Ramon began to savor his drawings and understand more of who he was and his talent too. -Good for teaching lessons about not listening to what negative things people have to say
  • (4/5)
    The book is about a little boy named Ramon who loved to draw. One day as he was drawing a vase of flowers his older brother looked at his drawing and criticised it. Embrassed by the criticism and the thought that he could not draw Ramon crumpled his drawing and threw it away. He tried to make the rest of his drawing look right but when it didn't he gave up. His sister who found Ramon crumpling another drawing, picked it up and ran outside the room. Ramon followed her to her room where to his surprise he found her walls covered with his crumpled drawing. She showed him her favorite one, which she called "vase-ish". After seeing her walls Ramon felt encouraged to draw again and he added the words "ish" to all his drawings. I liked this book since I feel like Ramon when I have to draw and this book encourages everyone that drawing don't have to be perfect.Extension 1. i would give the students water colors and have them paint something they like and have them explain to the teache what it is.2. Talk to the students about not giving up on anything because someone did not like it.
  • (5/5)
    This is a nice story about a young boy who loves to draw, and his brother puts him down by making a mean statement. So he gives up drawing completly, and becomes depressed. However, his sister thinks that what he does is awesome. And that encouragement and faith takes his art a long way.
  • (5/5)
    A boy loves to draw, but can't draw his pictures "right". He gets frustrated, tosses all his drawings and gives up. Then he find his younger sisters has collected his drawings, uncrumpled them and hung them up on her wall. He looks at the pictures, then complains to her that one picture looks nothing like a vase with flowers. She responds that it looks "vase-ish." The boy is re-inspired. He begins to draw pictures which look "tree-ish" etc. This story is brilliant, I love it. My almost-4-yr-old doesn't like it quite as much as I do, though.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a boy who loves to draw anywhere and everywhere, until someone tells him his picture does not look like it should. For a while he struggles with drawing until his sister starts collecting his crumpled artwork. At that point his sister restores his faith in his drawing abilities and all kinds of options are open for his drawing.I thought this was a cute and sweet book about art and sibling relationships. I could relate to the boy in this book about having someone criticize you, losing your faith in whatever was criticized and then having that faith restored. The sister in this book was a great example of a support system.I would read this book to my class whenever I need to talk about sharing, supporting and being considerate of other's feelings. I think a great project for this book would to have some kind of trust building exercise with it. Another thought would be to have the students draw an "ish" picture and tell us a story to go along with it.
  • (5/5)
    This is a book about a young boy, Ramon, who loved to draw. At least he loved it until his brother made fun of one of his pictures. He struggles to draw anything until his sister points out that while his drawings might not be perfectly realistic, they are "ish".
  • (5/5)
    I think my children really love this author and we wil have to continue to watch for more books by him!
  • (4/5)
    The illustrations in this book are good and simple. They also help the story move along and bring animation to the text. The plot in this book is also very plausible; this makes it so this book is a good example of a realistic fiction.
  • (5/5)
    This story is about a young boy who loves to draw. He continues to draw until his older brother scrutinizes it. Then with the new light from his younger sister he is able to love his drawing again. This is a great example of realistic fiction while promoting a healthy theme. Readers are very easily able to relate to this book.