Encontre seu próximo audiolivro favorito

Torne-se um membro hoje e ouça gratuitamente por 30 dias
What Katy Did

What Katy Did

Escrito por Susan Coolidge

Narrado por Laurel Lefkow


What Katy Did

Escrito por Susan Coolidge

Narrado por Laurel Lefkow

avaliações:
4/5 (22 avaliações)
Comprimento:
2 horas
Lançado em:
Mar 1, 2008
ISBN:
9789629543907
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro

Descrição

Meet Katy Carr. She’s Impulsive, gangly, adventurous, awkward and brave; she loves clambering over fences, sitting on roofs, making up games or going for picnics with her five brothers and sisters (much to the horror of her Aunt Izzie). But when she falls from a swing, she suddenly has to cope with being stuck indoors – maybe for ever. What Katy Did is fresh, lively, funny and moving; and Katy herself is a warm and loving character that readers have taken to their hearts for over a hundred and thirty years.

Lançado em:
Mar 1, 2008
ISBN:
9789629543907
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Susan Coolidge was the pen name of nineteenth-century American author Sarah Chauncey Woolsey. Born to wealth, Coolidge worked as a nurse during the Civil War before returning to her family home to take up a career in writing. Although best known for her classic Katy series of children’s novels including What Katy Did and What Katy Did Next, Coolidge also published more than twenty works of fiction, and edited The Autobiography and Correspondence of Mrs. Delaney and The Diary and Letter of Frances Burney. Coolidge died in 1905.

Relacionado a What Katy Did

Audiolivros relacionados

Análises

O que as pessoas pensam sobre What Katy Did

4.0
22 avaliações / 18 Análises
O que você acha?
Classificação: 0 de 5 estrelas

Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    I'm not sure if I ever read this as a child - although it was one of my Mum's favourite books I found it hard to get into. I enjoyed it as an adult though, the enthusiastic joy of Katy and her siblings and their games and adventure, and then her growth and learning after her injury. I can see why people despise it for the 'pain is a lesson from God so we can become patient people' theme, which is very dangerous and needs to be handled with a lot of care, but I can also see why it is a classic.
  • (4/5)
    I actually really enjoyed this book. I know it's a bit old-fashioned now, and obviously things have changed a lot since this book was written. Girls aren't expected to be perfect little angels these days. But it's still a very sweet book. It was interesting to see Katy change from a rebellious little girl into a polite and kind young woman.One thing about this book that I didn't really like was the ending. I thought the last chapter seemed a bit rushed, and it seemed to me like the happy ending was a bit of an afterthought, and slightly unlikely too.
  • (5/5)
    If every young girl should read just one book, it should be this.

    This is a childhood favourite of mine, I love it. It's just the way a children's story should be, simple, slightly nostalgic to an older audience, and with a valuable lesson to learn.
  • (4/5)
    I know I read and re-read this as a kid and after reading Katy by Jacqueline Wilson I can see some of the problematic aspects to it. But also there are aspects that are period details, yes there were injuries that could happen to a back that are now treated with physio and injections (and I'm currently going through some of that myself, incidentally) but the best treatment of the time was rest and this is what Katy endures when she badly injures her spine after a stupid accident that is down to being a bit headstrong, which is, of course, disapproved of in this period. I had forgotten the neighbour with the counterfeiting husband that Katy befriends, but overall this is a story that in context is interesting. And I did enjoy the update I do think kids need to read stories from different periods to learn how life was and is different for different people in different places and times. The mild anti-Irish and anti-black sentiment is a discussion that would be useful for people too. Paternalism is another discussion that didn't come up in the afterwords though it was implied when Katy did some of the "good deeds". Cousin Helen does veer into preachy occasionally.Interesting, worth re-reading but the enjoyment was somewhat spoilt by adult views. Though I did empathise with Katy and her getting lost in reading when I was younger, I still remember the resonance.
  • (2/5)
    Hm. Yes it's preachy. Of course we'd like Katy to be able to have fun, and not have to learn to be a little housewife while bedridden while still a young teen. But the thing is, in those days before antibiotics, people did die, and other people did have to step up. And apparently this series is as to a memoir - inspired at least by the author's childhood. So, given all the context, I'm glad I kept reading the series. In fact, I'll give this 2.5 stars.
  • (4/5)
    It's... very moralistic. In a 19th-century, Christian fashion. HOWEVER, I still love it. It's such a ridiculous story and the bit about the School of Pain made me want to vomit (in fact, it reminded me of a stupendous article that appeared in Lupus UK about how chronic illness is really a "beautiful beast within" which is actually the most offensively stupid thing I have ever had the misfortune to see in my entire life, including that film where Jack Black is a luchador) but otherwise there is something so wonderfully compelling in the Katy character that will never make me able to hate this book despite me disagreeing with this whole moral construct. I don't actually think Katy is a less interesting character after she "grows up". There's nothing wrong with learning to be patient with others and to love your neighbour and try to see the best even in the worst situations. It just shouldn't be presented as a requirement of personhood. Anyway, compared to all the other turn-of-the-century sentimental crap that came out of American children's literature (Little Women, Anne of Green Gables, Pollyanna... VOMIT) this is a lot better, and I remember enjoying the sequels too! Good to read on a tiring journey.
  • (3/5)
    A charming old Children’s book about a little girl who hurts her spine in an accident and must remain in bed for almost two years. During that time she learns some important lessons about humility, patience and helping others and well, being able to see the positive side of her situation. The book deals with some serious issues as death, suffering and handicaps in a good way for Children - unfortunately Susan Coolidge is too eager to spread moral lessons all over the place. A more subtle approach would have been nice.
  • (3/5)
    I used to love this book so much when I was little. I'm pretty sure I had an abridged edition, because this seemed longer than the one I read, and I kept coming across things that were new to me. I reread this one as an ebook, though, so it was a little hard to judge the length and compare it.

    Anyway, it's obvious now what this book was trying to do -- how it was trying to get girls to learn to be patient and kind and content, and to be what everyone else wants/needs them to be, and all of that. I noticed that when I was younger, but I focused on the story more. I have to agree with whoever said that the lively Katy of the beginning of the book is perhaps more interesting, but I liked all of it. The story wasn't so very original, maybe, but I loved the presence of Cousin Helen, who sounded so very much like someone I'd like to know.

    I was surprised at how much I still liked it now, actually, and how much it could still interest me.
  • (3/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    So this book was sorta weird, in as much as I'm not really sure what I think of it. I started out really liking it. The antics of Katy and her siblings made me laugh out loud several times. Katy is a tomboy, impulsive, always getting into some scrape, saying the first that pops in her head...in other words, fun. The kind of girl most of us would have loved for a friend when we were that age.

    ~*~*~*~SPOILERS TO FOLLOW~*~*~*~*~*~

    The problem, though, is when Cousin Helen comes in half way through the book. Not surprisngly, Helen and Katy are polar opposites. Helen is paralyzed from the waist down (we surmise), but in spite of her trials, is well-mannered, soft-spoken, never says an ill-word about anyone, never complains, blah blah blah. Of course, the moral of the story is that all good little girls should be like Helen. Katy resolves to try, but of course fails. And because she fails, she has a tragic accident that leaves her bed-ridden for a couple of years. And naturally, during this time, she sees how right Helen is and becomes this wonderful, saint of a girl. Yada yada.

    I could have gotten past all that cheesiness, though. It was, after all, written in the 1800s. And in a lot of ways, the book reminds me of Little Women (which I did not like), with its Christian over-tones. However, the tragic tale of Helen was just too much for me. It was ridiculously implausible. Helen was engaged to be wed to Alex. Unfortunately, she has a tragic accident (we never learn what) that leaves her horrible ill; for a while, they think she will die. Helen ultimately survives, but will remain an invalid the rest of her life (again, they never come out and say she's paralyzed, but one can guess). Now that's all well and good. But HERE'S where it gets weird. Alex still wants to marry her, but she insists he cannot. She doesn't want to tie him down like that. Right noble of her, huh? SO THEN, Alex marries someone else and MOVES IN NEXT DOOR TO HELEN. Helen and his wife become best of friends. Alex and his wife have a daughter who they name Helen. Alex and his wife never do anything without first consulting Helen. I'm sorry, but are you F-ING serious? Am I the only one who sees the dysfunction in this? I was on board with refusing to marry the guy, but then to live next door to him and wife? And become one big, happy family? Come on. It sounds like "Days of our Lives" for the 1800s. Had I read this when I was in grade school, I probably would have glossed over it as "romantic." As an adult, though? I find it bizarre and creepy.

    In short, Cousin Helen ruined this book for me. It was okay. It was so funny in several places, I feel obligated to give it 3 stars, rather than 2. But do I consider it a must-read classic? Definitely not.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (4/5)
    Classic. Not as dated as I expected. Story of how you can turn disaster into, if not exactly triumph, a joyful life. Surprising similarities to Seven Little Australians (but with a happier ending). Very enjoyable.
  • (5/5)
    I loved and re-read this many times as a child. The Carr children could be silly, naughty and imaginative, and I must have identified with that!
  • (4/5)
    As a child I always wanted to read this novel, but never got around to it. Even almost grown, the novel still captivated me. Dear Katy with all her faults, trying so hard to do the right thing, and then the accident...I could put the book down until I knew if Katy would be alright.
  • (3/5)
    Katie wants to be a better person but she really doesn't begin to improve until she becomes disabled.
  • (5/5)
    Twelve year old Katy Carr and her five brothers and sisters have all kinds of fun adventures. A thicket becomes "Paradise", a hayloft a place for a "feast", and the entire house a playground for games invented by Katy. Katy means well, but is impulsive and irresponsible and is constantly getting into scrapes and trouble. After the Carr's Cousin Helen visits, Katy vows to be more like Cousin Helen, who is saint-like despite the fact that she had a bad accident and hasn't been able to walk for years. Unfortunately, Katy gets into the worst scrape of her life the very next day - disobeying her Aunt Izzie, she herself has a terrible accident. It will take Katy a long time to recover and in the course of her recovery she grows into a beautiful, responsible young woman. I loved reading "What Katy Did" as a child and it's still fun to read as an adult. Written in the 1870's, it is definitely old-fashioned, but it makes me yearn for the days when life was so much simpler. Susan Coolidge writes as if she is sitting opposite the reader, verbally telling the story and uses words that children might use such as "honestest" which makes the book a pleasant read. Coolidge also includes humor that children won't get, but adults will, such as when Katy gives Aunt Izzie $7.25 and a long list of Christmas presents to buy with that small amount of money. Katy is a very realistic heroine; yes, she gets into mischief, but what child doesn't, and she means well. The rest of the children are equally engaging, for me Elsie stands out. Cousin Helen is indeed saintly, almost unbelievable in her goodness, but Coolidge makes her believable also. "What Katy Did" is a nice, old-fashioned read.
  • (3/5)
    As a child I always wanted to read this novel, but never got around to it. Even almost grown, the novel still captivated me. Dear Katy with all her faults, trying so hard to do the right thing, and then the accident...I could put the book down until I knew if Katy would be alright.
  • (5/5)
    I. love. this. book. When I first discovered it in our bookshelf, I absolutely fell in love with the characters, obviously Katy most of all. For years I felt very acutely the injustice of not having been born in the early 20th century in a countryside somewhere in Devon or Kent. This is a book I will hold on to forever, and one of the few where I actually have an emotional attachment to. Definitely going to save this one for any future spawn I may produce. It's got everything a children's classic should contain. The main character, Katy, is a precocious young girl, the eldest of a large family. She's always getting herself into scrapes, as young children do, and is imaginative and lively, always thinking up stories in their garden, which actually sometimes get her into trouble. One day, as a result of her disobedience, she gets into an accident that will change her life forever. However, this accident unleashes a series of events which actually enrich her, fill her with compassion and kindness, and most importantly the strength to move on in the face of her adversity. The book had a great impact on me as a child, and for a month afterwards I tried very hard to be like the serene and wonderful and impossibly perfect Helen, one of the characters in the book. A month of commitment from a 10 year old is pretty impressive, looking back!
  • (4/5)
    A great read for anyone.
  • (5/5)
    I loved reading this book. It was one of my favourites as a child and I was half afraid I wouldn't enjoy it as much now I'm all grown up.I wasn't disappointed however.This book is perfect for anyone who wants their kids to read some wholesome old fashioned literature.