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Scranimals

Scranimals

Escrito por Jack Prelutsky

Narrado por Jack Prelutsky


Scranimals

Escrito por Jack Prelutsky

Narrado por Jack Prelutsky

avaliações:
5/5 (9 avaliações)
Comprimento:
27 minutos
Editora:
Lançado em:
Jul 10, 2007
ISBN:
9780061536977
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

So put on your pith helmet and prepare to explore a wilderness of puns and rhymes where birds, beasts, vegetables, and flowers have been mysteriously scrambled together to create creatures you've never seen before -- and are unlikely to meet again! Your guides -- Jack Prelutsky, poet laureate of the elementary school set, and two-time Caldecott Honor artist Peter Sis -- invite you to join them on an adventure you will never forget!

Editora:
Lançado em:
Jul 10, 2007
ISBN:
9780061536977
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Jack Prelutsky is the best-selling author of more than fifty books of poetry, including The New Kid on the Block, illustrated by James Stevenson, and Stardines Swim High Across the Sky, illustrated by Carin Berger. Jack Prelutsky lives in Washington State.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Scranimals

4.8
9 avaliações / 10 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    Jack Prelutsky is entertaining again. Great poetry collection of 'scrambled' animals (with fruit, flowers, etc.) to entertain children. Definitely need to read aloud to enjoy the rhythm and rhyme.
  • (5/5)
    We totally adored this one! Going on the list of books we want in our home library!
  • (4/5)
    This book has fun poetry that will amuse both young and adult readers. The illustrations are intriguing and the concept of food and animal combinations make for an interesting read!
  • (5/5)
    Great fun for kindergartners and 1st Graders!
  • (5/5)
    Smart, smart versifying in this comical gazetteer-cum-bestiary of a land of gene-mod madness. My favourite is the avocadodo.Update: six months later this has become an obsession - daughter has memorised large tracts - my new favourite is the radishark. Or maybe the pandaffodil.
  • (5/5)
    Summary:Jack Prelutsky takes the reader on a journey to Scranimal Island where the most intriguing variety of mixed up animal-vegetable-plants live. The fun and nonsensical combination of unbelievable matches, with just enough recognizable traits from their name, send the imagination on a wild goose chase to discover what else might be found on Scranimal Island. Personal Reaction:A terrifically fun book that is deliberately silly and smart. The names of each of the animals create just enough of a puzzle that the reader must connect the dots so to speak, putting the clues from the text together as each animal is described. For those times when seriousness is over-rated, this is an excellent book to feed creativity. I will definitely read this book again!Classroom Extensions:1 - Create a classroom Scranimals Zoo. Students will create their own mix-matched animal-slash-vegetable (or fruit, or plant). Each animal will be illustrated by the student, and described in writing using a poem format. Illustrations with poems will be posted for display.2 - After reading Scranimals to the class, students will be asked to write in their own words an explanation of how these mixed up Scranimals got so mixed up. Who? What? When? Where? Why? and How?
  • (5/5)
    I read this book very often as a child. I rediscovered it when I chose my multicultural text set topic (journeys) and I am so happy I did. I used this book for a lesson plan in another class this semester and everyone really enjoyed the lesson. I love it still! It has so many different features in it that can be used in a lesson. The best part about this book is how creative Jack Prelutsky is with his poems. He creates new animals, such as the Avocadodos and the Bananaconda, and showcases how creative you can really be when it comes to poetry. The book is funny because of the new animals and the pictures that go with them. The poems and the illustrations combined showcase each animal's personality: "On a bump beside a road / Sits a lowly POTATOAD, / Obviously unaware / Of its own existence there." A picture of a giant toad that looks like a potato that is just staring at nothing. This book does not really have a big idea. It was just a collection of poems with a similar idea. One thing that can be taken away from this book is that the author emphasizes that the book is not finished in the last two lines: "Perhaps there is more to discover-- / We'd like to return there someday." I think this just encourages the reader to think of their own animals and add to the amazing animals you could find on Scranimal Island.
  • (5/5)
    I read this book recently for the first time when one of my classmates used it in a lesson plan presentation. I really enjoyed the book and thought it would be a valuable addition to my classroom library, so I purchased it that day. In my opinion, the most enjoyable aspect of this book is the creativity and uniqueness of the story. For example, the characters in the story are fantasy creatures that are created by combining the name of an animal with a fruit, vegetable, or other item. One of my most favorite characters is a combination of a snake and a banana, called a Bananaconda. The mood of the book is positive and humorous, mostly due to the highly imaginative language and set of creatures. The illustrations are drawn intricately, highlighting the details that portray a given creature and incorporate the meaning of the two words used to create it. I think the pictures are very important to the story and help the reader to visualize the poetic language. The big idea of this poetry book is to encourage readers to explore their creativity and imagination. “Perhaps there is more to discover.”
  • (4/5)
    I loved Scranimals for several reasons; including the language and illustrations. In this story, two children sail to Scranimal Island for an adventure to see wild animals. The author created new animals, which combined an animal and a plant. The illustrations are absolutely amazing to look at. They show the two children traveling through Scranimal Island, preview the next animal, and show a picture of the current animal. These illustrations really enhance the story and the reader’s imagination. The author wrote the story using poetry and rhyme. Each animal has a stanza or two describing them. The stanzas are patterned and flow well to keep the story moving. An example of a Scranimal is the Potatoad. This creation is a potato and a toad together. The stanza describes the Potatoad, “On its coarse and warty hide, It has eyes on every side, Eyes that fail, apparently, To take note of what they see.” The message of the story could easily be animals, but I think it also stands for adventure and using your imagination!
  • (5/5)
    I’ve always been a fan of Prelutsky’s poetry. It’s accessible for children and adults alike. In particular, I appreciate how there is a certain logic in how the animals are scrambled and how they are described. It serves as a great jumping off point for writing lessons emulating Prelutsky’s style.