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Understood Betsy

Understood Betsy


Understood Betsy

avaliações:
4.5/5 (30 avaliações)
Comprimento:
4 horas
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2006
ISBN:
9780975566398
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

Elizabeth Ann was orphaned at an early age and raised by her maiden aunts in the busy city. Sudden illness forces the aunts to send Betsy to other relatives, The Putnams, who live in the country on a farm. Betsy learns all about the farm and making butter and applesauce and dearly loves her new life. When one of the aunts comes back and wants to take Betsy back to the city. . . such a dilemma!

Children can readily relate to Betsy who is a real girl in a real world where fortune seems to direct her life. She so loves being on the farm and doing all the things a farm girl does, including going to school. When fate again intervenes and tries to take her away from the life she loves, some manner of common sense comes into play and Betsy, though torn, bounds into another day of farm life, full of caring love for all she comes in contact with, and grows into a beautiful young lady.

Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2006
ISBN:
9780975566398
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro




Análises

O que as pessoas pensam sobre Understood Betsy

4.5
30 avaliações / 18 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    A lovely story about Elizabeth Ann (Betsy) who is sent to live with relatives she's never met, when her Aunt becomes ill.
  • (4/5)
    Oh, I like that. The Putneys are a very clever lot. It's great watching Betsy flower - though it does require narrator intervention to point out a lot of it (more told than shown). For that reason, I liked the Wolf Pit and the fair better than the earlier unfoldings, though those are lovely too. I meant to read it and be done, but I suspect I'll be rereading this - it's quite like Eight Cousins and The Little Princess, both favorites. And a lovely ending - a trifle convenient, but in a realistic way.
  • (5/5)
    I first read this book when I was 12 years old, it had belonged to my mother when she was a child. Looking for a book for the Darth-Heather challenge of “Read a book more than a hundred years old” I chose this book which was first published in 1917.In rereading this book I once again felt old feelings of learning lessons of childhood and how to be successful. Dorothy Canfield Fisher embraced the teaching methods of Maria Montessori – of indirect support and challenges to self-instruction, are reflected in Understood Betsy.This is a great book, one which I plan to read with my grandson, or perhaps I will find an audio version for him, for his after school reading. I wish teachers would encourage students to read this as Dorothy Canfield Fisher was a pioneer in children’s literature.99
  • (5/5)
    A lovely story about Elizabeth Ann (Betsy) who is sent to live with relatives she's never met, when her Aunt becomes ill.
  • (4/5)
    This chatty, conversational children's novel about a young orphan girl who goes from one set of relatives to another set and blossoms with the change is a complete delight. It's another one I had never read as a child myself but picked up because of the Shelf Discovery Challenge. Elizabeth Ann is a small, somewhat sickly, very timid child who lives with her Aunts Harriet and Frances, neither of whom are actually aunts but are related more distantly than that. Aunt Frances, who has the main care of Elizabeth Ann loves Elizabeth Ann dearly but fosters in her a very dependent relationship. She is quite fond of declaring that she "understands" this little girl left in her care. When Aunt Harriet suddenly takes sick and must go away, needing Aunt Frances, who is actually Aunt Harriet's daughter, to attend to her health, Elizabeth Ann is sent to yet more distant relatives who, not really wanting to be responsible for her care, in turn send her to her mother's aunt's family. This upheaval and plan strikes fear and shuddering into the little girl as she has heard these cousins of hers disparaged as horrible for as long as she can remember. But lo and behold, when she is finally with the "horrid Putney cousins," she comes out of her shell and starts to relish life instead of jumping at her own shadow. She learns independence and resourcefulness under the laconic and easy care of these country-living folks. Rechristened Betsy, she is expected to help around the house and to master her own fears. She finds sympathy when she needs it but is not coddled, and stops thinking that her every thought and action is of utmost importance to Cousin Ann, Aunt Abigail, and Uncle Henry. Over the months of living with these cousins, Betsy grows into a sturdy, healthy child who learns much of life and of another way to love and be loved. Written in 1917 and set in that decade, the slower, simpler way of life at the time is now nostalgic for readers. The characters are appealing and wonderful and Fisher manages to show that Betsy is happier and healthier with the Putney cousins without disparaging Aunt Frances and her more fearful, fluttery parenting style. This is a sweet book and one that I'm glad I finally made the acquaintance of.
  • (4/5)
    This was a sweet book. I never read it as a child, and enjoyed being transported back to a simpler time as an adult. I liked the style of the narrator addressing the reader directly. This wouldn't be appropriate in an adult book, but this is a children's book, and I found the maternal and loving tone to be refreshingly charming. Overall, a comforting read for children and adults alike.