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The Kite Rider

The Kite Rider


The Kite Rider

avaliações:
4/5 (5 avaliações)
Comprimento:
6 horas
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2003
ISBN:
9781933322643
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

A soaring story that will sweep listeners from the docks of China to the court of Kublai Khan as young Haoyou learns to ride the winds strapped to a great scarlet kite in the traveling circus of the Great Miao.

But other winds swirl about Haoyou, winds of revenge and deceit and greed. And no matter how high he flies, there is always greedy Uncle Bo, holding him like an anchor, waiting to drag him down.

A breathtaking historical novel from two time Whitbread Prize winner Geraldine McCaughrean.

©2002 Geraldine McCaughrean; (P)2004 Full Cast Audio

Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2003
ISBN:
9781933322643
Formato:
Audiolivro

Sobre o autor

Geraldine McCaughrean is the Printz Award-winning author of The White Darkness. She has been honored with England's most prestigious children's book award, the Carnegie Medal, and is the only three-time winner ever of the Whitbread Children's Book Award. She also wrote Peter Pan in Scarlet, the first official sequel to the treasured masterpiece Peter Pan, and the critically acclaimed The Death-Defying Pepper Roux. Geraldine lives in Berkshire, England, with her husband and actress daughter.


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4.2
5 avaliações / 5 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    Such a frustrating book to read, in an amazing why. I was drawn into this wonderful yet heart wrenching of a story. I found myself loathing multiple characters and questioning the motive/reasoning/ and thought process of the main character (a young boy who does everything that he is told to do, which drove me crazy). Very well written, as the author provides a great story and that the reader is easily transported back to China in the 13th century. The author does provide background information in an afterward about the 13th century and Kublai Khan. From my knowledge I would have to say that the book does accurately reflect the values and the norms of the Chinese culture. The author does a great job in bringing this story to life by the dialog of the characters, providing with a detailed setting, honest and accurate facts thus making this a believable story. Such a good story that I want to read more about and learn more of Chinese history and culture. I would think that many young children would enjoy this book due to the lack of exposure to Chinese history. This story deals with many problems that still are relevant in today's society (racism, poverty, family relations, substance abuse, etc...).Ages 12 and up
  • (3/5)
    FINALLY settled in with some knitting to listen to the rest of this one. Over all it was quite an interesting read/listen. The actors did a good job of bringing it to life and the annoying characters were suitably strangle-worthy. The author did a good job of giving the reader a feeling of being back in 13th Century China without overwhelming us with historical details. Details were presented as needed and reasonably paced with the action. I found the characters a little annoying, however. The main character (the boy) seemed either exceptionally stupid or a very slow learner when it came to making the right choices and dealing with his family, and the adults around him never seemed to explain much or take the time to try to teach him. Still, it was interesting, and ended quite well, without leaving the reader dangling or wondering what happened.The concept of the story was quite interesting too. Riding on a kite. . .if a bit odd. But I'll blame the oddness on the practice that caught the author's attention in the first place. :)
  • (5/5)
    A tremendous historical novel exploring the limits to courage and obedience in 13th century China. The key protagonists are a credulous twelve-year-old boy and his unorthodox ascerbic cousin as they join a circus and travel to meet Kublai Khan. The historical environment is conveyed lightly; the emphasis is on the constancy of human responses not on the temporal changes. The characters' emotions are described deftly in an engaging style. The great strength of this absorbing book lies in its conscious address to young readers without any condescension. There is a knowing wit that will appeal to adult readers too.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book, but I didn't love it. I was really glad there was a list of characters at the beginning of the book, because at first I struggled with remembering who was who. I thought the character development was a little week, especially the main character. However, I felt that the author did a good job of providing the reader with a vivid image of the areas in which they traveled. This book was full of adventure and excitement. Right from the beginning there was action and intrigue and it carried through to the end. I also enjoyed learning a little bit ab out China and Kublai Khan in the author's note .
  • (4/5)
    It's about the adventures of a young Chinese boy at the beginning of the Mongol rule; he learns painfully and slowly that simple obedience to elders and the teachings of others isn't an answer to all life's challenges. It was a decent read, interesting and well-written. However, I was expecting something much lighter and more fun when I picked it up (a long time ago, but I remember) and had a bit of a shock. This is a pretty bloody book, and one full of bitterness and pain for the characters. That being the case, I'm not especially inclined to look out more of McCaughrean's work.