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Extra Credit

Extra Credit

Escrito por Andrew Clements

Narrado por Gabra Zackman


Extra Credit

Escrito por Andrew Clements

Narrado por Gabra Zackman

avaliações:
4.5/5 (34 avaliações)
Comprimento:
3 horas
Lançado em:
Jun 23, 2009
ISBN:
9780743582070
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

It isn't that Abby Carson can't do her schoolwork, it's just that she doesn't like doing it. And that means she's pretty much failing sixth grade. When a warning letter is sent home, Abby realizes that all her slacking off could cause her to be held back -- for real! Unless she wants to repeat the sixth grade, she'll have to meet some specific conditions, including taking on an extra-credit project: find a pen pal in a foreign country. Simple enough (even for a girl who hates homework).

Abby's first letter arrives at a small school in Afghanistan, and Sadeed Bayat is chosen to be her pen pal....Well, kind of. He is the best writer, but he is also a boy, and in his village it is not appropriate for a boy to correspond with a girl. So his younger sister dictates and signs the letter. Until Sadeed decides what his sister is telling Abby isn't what he'd like Abby to know.

As letters flow back and forth between Illinois and Afghanistan, Abby and Sadeed discover that their letters are crossing more than an ocean. They are crossing a huge cultural divide and a minefield of different lifestyles and traditions. Their growing friendship is also becoming a growing problem for both communities, and some people are not happy. Suddenly things are not so simple.
Lançado em:
Jun 23, 2009
ISBN:
9780743582070
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Andrew Clements is the author of picture books and novels for young readers, including Because Your Daddy Loves You and the perennial bestseller Frindle. He lives in Baldwin, Maine, and can also be found at www.andrewclements.com.

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4.3
34 avaliações / 28 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (3/5)
    Oops I read this in one day and was sad when it ended. I thought I have another couple of chapters but when she said the farms and green fields were beautiful and I turned the page, it was all over. Great book, especially where 2 parts of the world are compared and contrasted.

    It isn’t that Abby Carson can’t do her schoolwork. She just doesn’t like doing it. And in February a warning letter arrives at her home. Abby will have to repeat sixth grade—unless she meets some specific conditions, including taking on an extra credit project: find a pen pal in a distant country. Seems simple enough.

    But when Abby's first letter arrives at a small school in Afghanistan, the teacher takes it to the village elders. And everyone agrees that any letters going back to America must be written well in English. And the only qualified student is a boy, Sadeed Bayat. Except in this village, it is not proper for a boy to correspond with a girl. So Sadeed’s younger sister will write the letters. Except she knows hardly any English. So Sadeed must write the letters. But what about the villagers who believe that girls should not be anywhere near a school? And what about those who believe that any contact with Americans is . . . unhealthy?

    As letters flow back and forth—between the prairies of Illinois and the mountains of central Asia, across cultural and religious divides, through the minefields of different lifestyles and traditions—a small group of children begin to speak and listen to each other. And in just a few short weeks, they make important discoveries about their communities, about their world, and most of all, about themselves.

  • (3/5)
    I liked the protaganists, but was disappointed that nothing really seemed to have changed in the end in terms of world views. Maybe that was the point?
  • (3/5)
    Narrated by Gabra Zackman. Abby is in danger of having to repeat the 6th grade but an extra-credit project can help her meet the requirements for advancement. Her project is to begin a penpal correspondence with a student in Afghanistan. Sadeed is tapped by his teacher to be that correspondent but village leaders rule that, for propriety's sake, Sadeed's sister Amira must write the letters and Sadeed can help with the English. Still, Abby and Sadeed manage to find a kindred spirit in each other, before the correspondence is abruptly cut short by the village leaders. I liked the idea of young people from very different places finding a common ground, and particularly involving a country so often in the news today.
  • (4/5)
    This was a great approach to a very contemporary issue. The exchange of letters between a girl from Illinois and brother and sister in Afghanistan really approaches an issue a perfect way. It allows the reader to feel comfortable in discussing the place without being overwhelmed by it. I was very impressed with the honest and delicate approach he took with the whole exchange. It seemed plausible and sincere. That's the way a good book does things.
  • (4/5)
    Well done story with good characters. A chance to introduce current history.
  • (4/5)
    Might be a good companion to Three Cups of Tea. Another charming school story from the author of Frindle, this one about a pen pal r'ship 'twixt a girl in the US and a boy in a Afghanistan.
  • (3/5)
     The book is about a girl named Abby who was assigned to write letters to a pen pal in Afghanistan in order to not fail the 6th grade. Through her correspondence with her pen pal they start to form a strong connection.
  • (4/5)
    When Abby Carson learns she's in danger of failing the sixth grade, her teacher assigns her an extra credit assignment to help with her social studies grade. Abby will write to a pen pal in Afghanistan and then present a report to the class. When Sadeed writes back to her, Abby learns that although they are different, they are also the same, and she begins to see her life in America through new eyes. Andrew Clements is a master of realistic fiction for middle graders. Abby and Sadeed came to life for me and I didn't want to stop reading about them. I wouldn't say this is one of my favorite of Clements's books, but it's a solid addition to his stellar list of titles. With the Middle East in the news so often, this would make a great classroom title and perhaps it'll inspire elementary students to pick up a pen and make their own connections across the globe.
  • (5/5)
    In this thrilling book, Abby is in danger of having to repeat sixth grade unless she completes an extra credit project that involves writing to a pen pal in Afghanistan. While the action in the book starts out slowly, it quickly picks up when Abby begins to receive letters from the brother of the girl she thought she had been writing to, saying that he had been writing the letters through his sister since it was against his culture for a boy to write to a girl. Reading this book provides readers with a glimpse into the relationship between the U.S. and Afghanistan and how intolerance exists in both of these countries. It also teaches readers that there is more to life in Afghanistan than bombing, shooting, and fighting and gives them a glimpse into Afghan culture. The book reads like an exchange between Abby and the brother/sister pair in Afghanistan, since their letters and actions are profiled in different chapters. This book is highly recommended for libraries. Not only will readers be able to relate to the school theme and learn about a form of communication other than email or calling, but they will also learn a valuable lesson about appreciating one’s own home and respecting others’ cultures.
  • (4/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    Grades 3 and up. Enjoyable story about far-away pen pals that learn a lot about themselves and each other.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (5/5)
    This is a fantastic story of accepting situations and people for what they are and pushing to achieve goals. Abby finds herself about to be held back if she cannot do better in school and ends up needing an extra credit assignment to bring her grades up. Little did she know that she would be making a new friend in another part of the world! Sadeed is a good student in Afghanistan and is not pleased at the thought of having to help his sister write letters back and forth with a girl in America but soon finds himself looking forward to the letters just as much as his sister.
  • (4/5)
    This was a really good and interesting book. The friendship between Abby and Sadeed seems a bit rushed. The ending seemed a bit empty as well. There's no resolution as to who the whiny rat was that couldn't deal with the concept of there being other religions.
  • (4/5)
    This story bridges part of a cultural gap between two different countries, Illinois, United States and Afghanistan, but brings up questions that sometimes can't be answered. Working hard for something that you want even need pays off if you are sincere about it. Procrastination for too long can really hurt you personally. There are lessons to be had in this book, prioritizing, working hard to accomplish a targeted outcome, overcoming fears, bending rules that are not harmful to others, but understanding why the rules are in place. This is a chapter book for ages 8-12. It does not get bogged down in the task at having to do the homework but keeps up the pace to see what the next letter will say.
  • (3/5)
    This meaningful novel is about a girl who struggles in school. In order to pass seventh grade she must accomplish an extra credit project: Communicating with a kid on the other side of the world! She becomes friends with her pen pal and learns more about this new culture.
  • (5/5)
    Genre: Realistic FictionReview: The author did a good job of creating a book that stays true to the genre of realistic fiction. This is a vary believable story that centers around a young girl who is about to flunk the 6th grade and her only means of passing is to do an extra credit project that involves writing to a penpal overseas. Media: Pencil
  • (4/5)
    Abby isn't passing her classes. She doesn't want to fail middle school so she is given an extra credit assignment. She must write to a pen pal in Afghanistan. Things get interesting when her pen pal turns out to be a boy, posing as his sister because her writing isn't up to his standards. It's a great story that shows both cultures in a realistic light. A fun read that will make you think, too!
  • (4/5)
    I was interested to read this book, because it is my impression that there are not enough books that seek to educate young readers about the current contention between the US and Afghanistan. At first I was very disappointed with the pace of this book - it felt extremely slow. Even when I was almost halfway through I felt that the plot dragged and the voice was very slow. However, once Sadeed wrote his own letter to Abby, things started picking up and I got much more interested. I loved the symbolism of the mountain rock and the little pile of dirt taking on new meaning after traveling across the world. The imagery was very powerful. I thought the author portrayed the racism and hatred that can exist in both cultures very well and painted both episodes in a way that was simple and easy for young readers to understand while still showing them how detrimental it is. I think this book would be a great resource for teaching students not only about the relationship between the US and Afghanistan, but for teaching acceptance and respect for other cultures. The best thing about this book is that it shows intolerance on both sides of the world and how sad this intolerance makes both Abby and Sadeed. Seeing intolerance through these two different lenses makes this book much more meaningful and valuable as a teaching tool.
  • (5/5)
    A story about Abby in the sixth grade who doesnt seem to care much about her course work, she just doesnt want to do the work. She loves gym and the climbing wall. She learns that becuase of her lack of school work completed she may have to repeat sixth grade. She is told by her teacher that unless she wants to repeat, she must do some projects. One of these is a writting assingnment that she has to pick a child in another country and write to him or her. The assignment sparks her interest and she learns alot about the boy from Afgahnistan. She learns that girls in that country are not encouraged to go to school. That he is a boy and boys and girls should not be writting to each other in his country.They become good friends and learn alot about each others lives and how different they are but how much in common they have.
  • (4/5)
    Possibly my favorite of the Bluestems. Of course, life is different for kids in America and Afghanistan, but such an interesting way to show what's important.
  • (5/5)
    I thought it was an outstanding book.
  • (5/5)
    This is a story about and American girl named Abby and an Afghan boy named Sadeed. Abby is about ready to fail sixth grade so to avoid repeating it the following year she takes on an extra credit assignment that entails writing to a pen pal in Afghanistan. Due to conservative traditions in Afghanistan a girl is selected to write to Abby, but her brother Sadeed, who is also the best student in the village, oversees the letter writing to uphold the village's honor. Abby begins to take the pen pal writing seriously when she sees how much work Amira (really Sadeed) puts into her letters. A secret friendship evolves between Abby and Sadeed after Sadeed reveals to her that he is actually writing the letters. After a hostile in Afghanistan discovers that the village is friendly with Americans, the people in the village grow afraid that they will be attacked and the letter writing comes to an end. This story sends the message that we should not take the freedom that we have as US citizens for granted. We have many privileges and opportunities that people of other countries do not have. I enjoyed reading this book and would recommend it to others. This would be an excellent book to read when studying the Middle East and warfare. It would also be a good book to read as a class if the class is going to have pen pals. Reading this book brought back memories of my first pen pal in third grade. She went to another school in the town I grew up in, but I remember how excited I would get when her letters came in the mail.
  • (3/5)
    Abby is failing 6th grade! The only way Abby can pas is if she does all her work and a extra credit project. The project is to send messages to a person living in Afghanistan, but a problem occures and they cant send any more letters
  • (5/5)
    age app: intermediategenre: realistic fictionreview: this is a great example of realistic fiction because it takes probable circumstances of a girl and a boy pen pal, and the risks and dangers of their communication. It shows the positives and negatives of the two cultures, and puts the people of Afghanistan in a positive light.
  • (4/5)
    Another well written “school story” which bridges the gap between Eastern and Western cultures: Abby is a lazy 6th grader, who loves rock climbing and being outdoors, anything but doing her homework. Sadeed is also 12 years old, but is the brightest student and most proficient English-speaker in his village. The two are brought together for Abby’s extra credit project so she can be promoted to 7th grade, but cultural morays and prejudices get in the way of their budding friendship.
  • (3/5)
    Abby Carson finds out that if she doesn’t pull up her grades she will have to repeat sixth grade. Her social studies teacher allows her to do an extra credit assignment to help pull up her grade. Her extra credit assignment is to become a pen pal to another student in a different country. Abby Carson from Illinois becomes friends with sister and brother, Amira and Sadeed Bayat, from Afghanistan.The pen pal aspect of this story I think is what drew me to it because in my fourth grade year we had a girl in my class whose father wrote postcards to us from the road of his truck driving. I also thought it would be interesting to see how the author would make Amira and Sadeed portray their ideas to an American pen pal considering the Iraq Freedom War.Extension Ideas1. As a class pen pal to another school in a different country.2. Do a unit on the different types of landforms.
  • (5/5)
    Abby Carson is flunking sixth grade. She loves P.E. because they do rock climbing, so that’s all she focuses on. When her guidance counselor sends a letter home saying she will be retained she decides to do whatever it takes to pass. She must meet “B’s” the rest of the year in all subjects and do a special project for Language Arts. Her project involves writing to a pen pal in Afghanistan. Sadeed is the best student in his village. When the letter arrives from America it is decided he will secretly help his sister write letters to Abby as it would be inappropriate for a young boy to write a young girl. Little do they know that these letters will cause controversy on both sides of the ocean. This was a great book. It gave a glimpse into the culture of those in Afghanistan. Highly recommend this to my students.
  • (4/5)
    The only thing about school that interests Abby is the rock climbing wall. In the flat landscape of Illinois there aren't many places to climb. When she realizes that her poor grades will keep her in 6th grade for another year, she decides to make a change. As part of the agreement with her teachers Abby must participate in an extra credit project. She chooses a pen-pal project from the bag of ideas, when given the choice of location she selects the most mountainous. Story follows Abby and Sadeed's correspondence. Touches on the major geographic and cultural differences between the US and Afghanistan. Also shows how very much alike we are.
  • (5/5)
    Sixth grader Abby Carson enters into an extra credit project that involves sending letters to a child in another country, in order to avoid failing her school year and being kept back. She chooses to write to someone in Afghanistan, mostly because it is the only country from the choices she is given that has mountains, and she is really interested in rock climbing. When Abby's first letter arrives, a boy is chosen to oversee the writing of the letter, but it is Sadeed's sister who actually gets the credit because it would not be appropriate for a boy to be writing to a girl. Of course, Abby knows none of this because she grew up in North America, but she does experience some problems of her own, which she solves in a tactful manner. I highly recommend this book to sixth grade students, especially those who love Clements other books.