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The Beloved Dearly

The Beloved Dearly

Escrito por Doug Cooney

Narrado por Doug Cooney


The Beloved Dearly

Escrito por Doug Cooney

Narrado por Doug Cooney

avaliações:
3/5 (13 avaliações)
Comprimento:
3 horas
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2002
ISBN:
9781932076547
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

Ernie Castellano, fast-talking wheeler-dealer kid, has come up with his greatest idea yet: pet funerals! With his pals Dusty (an artist in coffins) and Swimming Pool (one of the world's great criers, an asset to any funeral she attends) Ernie creates a thriving business—and manages to land himself in more hot water than he has ever dreamed of. High-spirited, hilarious, and unexpectedly touching, The Beloved Dearly is a sparkling debut for a major new voice in books for young readers. An actor and performance artist himself, Doug Cooney is uniquely suited to narrate this hilarious novel version of his own highly acclaimed play, which was first performed at Lincoln Center. Doug's recent work includes a screenplay for an animated version of the classic Dr. Seuss film The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T.
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2002
ISBN:
9781932076547
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Doug Cooney is the author of the middle-grade novels The Beloved Dearly and I Know Who Likes You. His musical adaptation of George Saunders's The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip recently premiered at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Los Angeles, produced by the Mark Taper Forum P.L.A.Y. Cooney also teaches songwriting and collaboration for Voices Within, an educational outreach program of the Los Angeles Master Chorale. He divides his time between Los Angeles and South Florida. You can visit him at www.dougcooney.com.

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3.2
13 avaliações / 15 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    Paula Danzinger was another staple author of my early adolescence. She doesn't hold a candle to Judy Blume for emotional or moral/ethical depth, but she still wrote a number of compellingly readable titles filled with humor and a realistic amount of angst. Marcy is in ninth grade and she's shy, has no self-esteem - although lots of pragmatism - and a pretty lousy home life. The first three lines of the book run: "I hate my father. I hate school. I hate being fat." Her father is verbally abusive and not at all subtle about it. She hates school because she's bored. She's intelligent and not at all challenged, until Ms. Finney comes along and teaches English in a whole new way. She's fat and she's opting to completely fail gym because there's no way she's changing and showing in front of the other girls. She has a running list of hilarious excuses for why she doesn't dress out for gym each day (hence the title of the book). These three themes are woven into a story that's basically about peace, love and understanding. It is so a book of its time (early 70's), but it's also funny and empowering. Through Ms. Finney's teaching Marcy makes new friends and they all learn the importance of standing up for what they believe in. At 119 pages, this book is short. As a result, it tackles these themes only shallowly and a lot of people aren't going to like the whole fat angle. But for me, it had nostalgia going for it and I liked that Danzinger didn't have Marcy going on diets or crazy exercise plans; Marcy just starts opting out of the junk food and ice cream. At the end of the book (which doesn't end all that satisfactorily btw), Marcy's still "fat" but the reader is left with the idea that she's making positive changes regardless of whether she'll get a smaller waist or not.
  • (4/5)
    Better and different from what I expected.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:Marcy Lewis pretty much hates everything about her life. She thinks she is fat and unattractive. Her father is verbally abusive and her mother is a wreck of anxiety. However when she gets a new English teacher her life starts according to her to "suck a little less". Her new English teacher, Ms. Finney, is fun and makes learning interactive. she cares about her students beyond their ability to preform on tests. She even stars an after school club where Marcy makes new friends. Marcy is devastated when Ms. Finney gets in trouble for not saying the pledge of allegiance. The board of education will hold a trial to determine if Ms. Finney is fit to teach the children. Marcy and her friends decide they want to help Ms. Finney. They get together to plan a sit in but they are suspended from school before they can do so. Throughout the process of trying to fight for Ms. Finney Marcy makes new friends and discovers she can have a social life. Her mother also finds her own voice in backing up Ms. Finney. Ms. Finney wins her case but ends up resigning.Review:I did not think this book was particularly entertaining. I liked the themes of it. Family, friendship, first love, Verbal abuse, and self image. However I do not think these themes were well developed. Marcy and her Mother do gain some confidence and Marcy makes one knew friend. However most of her problems are resolved. For example her self image. Although the title of the book, it's opening lines, and many other comments throughout the book imply this is a main theme, Marcy's self image never improves during the book. By the end of the book she is still failing gym because she is too self conscious to wear her gymsuit. I almost feel like the author tried to take so much in this few hundred pages that she was unable to develop any of them well. However there is one thing I like about the book. The characters are relatable. A lot of little girls could see themselves reflected in Marcy.
  • (4/5)
    Danziger's writing captures the essence of teenage girls better than anyone else's that I've read and can recall. Her characters are brilliantly developed, which brings you deep into the heart of each subplot and makes the outcomes truly important to you. This book can comfort - and perhaps even encourage - any young woman whose self-image is less-than-stellar, particularly if her home life is a contributing factor.
  • (4/5)
    Danziger's writing captures the essence of teenage girls better than anyone else's that I've read and can recall. Her characters are brilliantly developed, which brings you deep into the heart of each subplot and makes the outcomes truly important to you. This book can comfort - and perhaps even encourage - any young woman whose self-image is less-than-stellar, particularly if her home life is a contributing factor.
  • (4/5)

    This was a decent coming of age novel.  I probably would have enjoyed it more if I was actually coming of age, and going through similar experiences.  Now, I'm looking at the characters with the benefit of wisdom that comes with age.  However, having said that, Danziger created some phenomenal characters that were very relatable.  At one point, when Marcy's father was being a worse emotional abuser than normal, I actually called my father and told him I loved him for not being like that.  The best part was the ending, the problems were resolved in a realistic manner.  Everything was not rainbows and butterflies", but life went on anyway.

    "
  • (4/5)
    Anyone who has ever felt like an outsider, felt like the fattest person in the room, or felt shy beyond imagination can relate to this book. 
  • (3/5)
    Man oh man, this is dated. I remembered loving it as a kid, so I picked up the audio at the library. The production is excellent, but the book's become a period piece. Women's libbers, Ms. vs. Miss, kids who smoke "grass", and crying mothers everywhere. The moral is much more apparent to my jaded adult eye, and the preaching shows. Aside from that, Mrs. Lincoln, it was a good book. There are certainly parts which are timeless, still valid, but I recommend reading something current instead. Danziger's afterword, added for the 30th anniversary, is better than the book.
  • (3/5)
    Warning: this review might make me sound like an old person.I couldn't help but read The Cat Ate My Gymsuit with a bit of wistfulness. Though the characters, voice, and situations likely still remain true to life, I suspect that there just isn't a place for books like Danziger's in the current world of children's and young adult writing.It's the story of Marcy, a fat middle schooler whose horizons are opened up by her new hippie teacher, Ms. Finney. Ms. Finney encourages her students to be in touch with their feelings--a radical concept for many of these small town kids who grew up in a world without Mister Rogers. When the teacher's radical politics and teaching style get her fired, Marcy and her friends decide to try some "radical" (for the time) tactics of their own.But what's notable about this book isn't necessarily the central driving plot, which is undeniably dated and is unlikely to resonate with modern teenagers. What's notable is Marcy, and her family. The misunderstood oldest child of a cowed house wife and verbally abusive father, Marcy relates her home life in a way that feels incredibly true-to-life. Interchanges between Marcy and her younger brother, and Marcy and her mother (particularly conversations about her mother's budding feminism) are really truly touching.Unfortunately, I just think that the niche for this sort of book has been supplanted. Marcy and her friends are undeniably teenagers, and deal tangentially with teen issues (peer pressure around drinking, first dates), but the voice--while well-rendered--is incredibly simplistic, as is the plot. The length and development are more akin to a modern low middle grade book than something that teenagers would want to read. For all its strengths, I couldn't help but close the cover and think "Who would read this?" Sadly, the only answer I could conjure was "nostalgic adults."
  • (2/5)
    What a disappointment this book was! I’ve seen it since elementary school and always wanted to read it. Now, though, I have to say this book will not stand the test of time. Marcy is in ninth grade, overweight, and feels ugly. The she meets this cool English teacher who changes her life. This teacher wears a macrame necklace and studies Marshall McLuhan. She asks students about their feelings and has a self-actualization group after school. But all this touchy-feely stuff is too much for the school administration. The cool English teacher is suspended and Marcy discovers inner strength and self-confidence as she fights for her favorite teacher.Many of the themes are universal--self-image, a special teacher, a disfunctional family. But the story itself is dated. The principal's daughter has run off to a commune. Marcy's assertiveness inspires her mom to think about woman's lib. Her mom might even dare to work outside the home! Moreover, the characters are pretty one-dimensional. Marcy's mom is passive, her brother is loving, and her dad is so overbearing and psychologically abusive, it's a wonder the family stays together. The book is geared for grades 5 to 8, but I would not recommend it.
  • (3/5)
    Though I've never been in a position like Marcy's, I still found her relatable and understood everything she went through. Good kid fiction.
  • (4/5)
    Clever and funny. A good example of a fallible heroine. Slightly dated (references to "grass" and the emerging feminist movement) but still appealing.
  • (4/5)
    This was over-recommended to me as a child, and I deliberately avoided it, even though I'd enjoyed a few books by the same author. I think I would have enjoyed it then more than I did now, reading it as an adult.Marcy Lewis lives with a doormat mother, an abusive father, no confidence in her friends, a weight problem, and a significant lack of confidence. When a new English teacher has Marcy's class looking at themselves and asking questions about life, Marcy finds a voice, and starts making new friends. The school administration, unhappy with the unorthodox teaching methods, suspends the beloved Ms. Finney, and Marcy comes out from hiding to stand up for what she believes is right. Marcy is an interesting character, and she felt very alive to me. But her family situation was so horrible, and yet so clichéd, that I kept losing my grip on the story, reacting to it as a historic artefact rather than a piece of fiction. In the evening, Marcy's mother greets her father at the door with a drink, he says that we works hard to support the family, he shouldn't have to talk to them as well. I think that the strong characters and realistic relationships (especially between Marcy and her little brother, and Marcy and her mother) make this novel rise above the standard problem novel, but I just couldn't suspend disbelief enough. As a 10-13-year-old, I would have bought it much better.I'd give this to fans of realistic stories, not looking for a big romantic sub plot, and also to readers interested in civil rights and student activism. It is also an example of how family abuse can be entirely non-physical, that emotional neglect can be as harmful as violence.
  • (4/5)
    Marcy Lewis is overweight. Her father dominates their family. She has a very low opinion of herself and she hates gym. Then Ms. Barbara Finney arrives as her English teacher. She is young, innovative and caring. She involves the students in learning as well as starting a group for students to discuss their feelings and get to know themselves better. Marcy begins to learn more about herself and to feel better about herself. She is enjoying school and making friends. Then, Ms. Finney is fired. The students decide to support her and organize themselves to help her. Marcy and her friend Joel are major leaders in the attempts to support Ms. Finney. During the time between the firing and the hearing, Marcy and her mother both grow in their confidence and understanding of each other. Marcy stops eating to compensate for her failure. She becomes a leader and finds the courage to speak up both to her father and to the principal. Ms. Finney is reinstated, but realizes she won't be an effective teacher in the district and resigns. Marcy and Joel feel they have been let down, but their parents help them realize that her position would have been impossible. Throughout the process, Marcy learns to think for herself, stand up for herself, and make her own decisions. She also has her first date and her first kiss, but she still hates gym.
  • (2/5)
    The main character in this book is in the 9th grade, but I feel like this book is for a much lower reading level than that. I thought the book was rather boring and definitely too old fashioned for most readers today (speaking about listening to rock records and going to a party in a purple pants suit). Overall I didn't care for it.