Encontre seu próximo audiolivro favorito

Torne-se um membro hoje e ouça gratuitamente por 30 dias
Beezus and Ramona

Beezus and Ramona

Escrito por Beverly Cleary

Narrado por Stockard Channing


Beezus and Ramona

Escrito por Beverly Cleary

Narrado por Stockard Channing

avaliações:
4.5/5 (97 avaliações)
Comprimento:
2 horas
Editora:
Lançado em:
Oct 5, 2010
ISBN:
9780062060167
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro

Descrição

Big sister Beezus Quimby tries to be patient with her four-year-old little sister, Ramona, but it isn't easy, not when Ramona powders her nose with marshmallows and invites her nursery school class to a party without telling her family. Sometimes Beezus doesn't like Ramona, but the girls are sisters and that means they will always love each other-just not every single minute.

Editora:
Lançado em:
Oct 5, 2010
ISBN:
9780062060167
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Beverly Cleary is one of America's most beloved authors. As a child, she struggled with reading and writing. But by third grade, after spending much time in her public library in Portland, Oregon, she found her skills had greatly improved. Before long, her school librarian was saying that she should write children's books when she grew up. Instead she became a librarian. When a young boy asked her, "Where are the books about kids like us?" she remembered her teacher's encouragement and was inspired to write the books she'd longed to read but couldn't find when she was younger. She based her funny stories on her own neighborhood experiences and the sort of children she knew. And so, the Klickitat Street gang was born! Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the American Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented to her in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature. Dear Mr. Henshaw won the Newbery Medal, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. Her characters, including Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph, the motorcycle-riding mouse, have delighted children for generations.

Relacionado a Beezus and Ramona

Audiolivros relacionados

Análises

O que as pessoas pensam sobre Beezus and Ramona

4.6
97 avaliações / 46 Análises
O que você acha?
Classificação: 0 de 5 estrelas

Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    So much fun; I know lots of kids can relate to these two!
  • (4/5)
    The moral of Beezus and Ramona is that it's okay not to love your sister ~all~ the time. And that's a good thing, because Ramona is quite the little brat. My sympathies were all with Beezus, almost 10, and having to care for her frequently horrible 4 year old sister so much of the time. But of course, they both love each other, and that's plain throughout the book. But they are almost 6 years apart in age, and have wildly different personalities.Each chapter is pretty much its own little short story. Other than having the same characters and themes there isn't much linking one chapter to the next. In each story, Ramona finds a new way to behave dreadfully and Beezus has to figure out how to deal with it.I got the impression that when Beverly Cleary wrote this first book in the series, way back in 1955, she had Beezus in mind as the main character, but judging from the titles, the other books in the series evidently follow Ramona more closely. Hopefully she's not quite as horrid as she grows older in later books. Since two of the latter ones won Newbery Honor awards, I assume the series improves. (Not that this is a bad book, but it's not a great one either.)
  • (5/5)
    I read this with my daughter - we're ready for the movie.
    She's anxious to read more Ramona! YEA!
  • (4/5)
    Another one of my favorite book series - you can't stay mad or stay away from Ramona Quimby for very long.
  • (4/5)
    I don't review every book I read--some small tomes I'll just run through to kill time, or sate my curiosity, and then never give them a second thought. This was going to be one of those books, until I laughed out loud. What had happened was that I was killing time in my daughter's second grade classroom. (She's a teacher, by the way, not a student.) I noticed this book in the classroom library, and since I had fond memories of reading Ramona the Pest when I was a kid, I figured I'd read a bit of this instead of the book I had in my backpack. Anyway, Beezus and Ramona is about Beezus Quimby, a nine year old girl in 1950s Oregon, and the troubles she has with her four year old sister Ramona. At first I enjoyed reading a book written in the 1950s--a different world in many ways. Soon enough, my enjoyment was garnished with chuckles over Ramona's antics. She is the chaos bringer, the one who manages to see and act in the world in a way that is different from the average person and who is quite disconcerting to those, like Beezus, who expect a certain order to their lives. Anyway, a few chapters in I got to the laugh out loud joke--an incident which revealed to me that not only is Ms. Cleary able to write about crazy shenanigans, but she has a clever wit in her tool kit as well. So from that point, I knew that I wanted to finish reading the book (easily done) and tell you all to check it out.--J.
  • (5/5)
    Beverly Cleary's Beezus and Ramona (ages 8-9) is great introduction to the Frisby family and their adventures. The relationship between older and younger sister transcends its setting, portraying the realities of life among siblings in today's world. Ramona is the quintessential annoying younger sister whose behavior not only is typical, but her motivations and the consequences are clearly delineated and described. Middle America is honestly represented in Cleary's ouvre, a place that may still exist in our ever-changing pluralistic society, but is not as common place as it once was. Nonetheless, this series transcends the vageries of 21st century life by portraying timeless complexities and complications of family life.
  • (5/5)
    What crazy thing will that impossible little sister do next?! Join Beezus as she gets annoyed with, and sometimes even freaked out by, Ramona's shenanigans. This page turner will have you hurrying to the bookstore for the next book in the series, eager to find out what terrible naughtiness Ramona is up to now. Will Beezus ever get a moment's peace? You'll have to read it to find out!
  • (2/5)
    I think the writing in this book is seriously outdated. I read these books when I was younger, but I found that I didn't really have any memory of whether or not I thought they were any good. I think the reason I had a lack of memory is because this book is simply not memorable. There are so moments that are fun but overall this book isn't anything special. I think Beverly Cleary has other books that a so much better.
  • (4/5)
    This first book of the Ramona series is told from the exasperated point of view of Ramona's older sister, Beatrice (or "Beezus" as Ramona calls her). Ramona is an energetic and imaginative four year old who does not want to listen to anyone, but especially not her nine year old sister. While I cannot recall being four, I have seen children of that age act in a similar manner to Ramona's, and I found myself chuckling over not only her antics, but her "logic", as only the logic of a four year old can be!Highly entertaining!
  • (3/5)
    I can't believe Cleary wrote a whole series about this obnoxious child. Now I know where the Real Housewives of New Jersey came from.
  • (5/5)
    My little one and I have been thoroughly enjoying this series for bedtime reading. (My daughter refers to this sisterly duo as "Beezus and Fermona" lol.) Reading them is a fun nostalgia trip for me, recalling not only the days when I read them as a child, but also the days when children had a lot more freedom than they do today.
  • (3/5)
    This book is about Beezus, Ramona's older sister, who dislike having to change her life because of Ramona (during her birthday, at home, in the library, talking with neighbors). At the end, Beezus learn to love Ramona, but it was a hard task for her.This is a very nice book to teach about family and friendship. Students will learn about getting to know and respect each other by what they really are.Reading Journal: count as 1 Early Chapter Book
  • (4/5)
    I read this book aloud to my daughters.Cleary was one of my favourite authors as a child, and I loved the Ramona Quimby series. It was a pleasure to re-read this one with my girls. Ramona is hilarious, and we all laughed out loud at her antics. My girls are nearly the same age as Ramona and Beezus in this book, so it was especially fun for them to read how other sisters their own age relate to each other...and maybe they see that they don't have it so bad :)We will be reading the rest of the series together.
  • (4/5)
    As a kid, I used to devour Beverly Cleary books and the Ramona series was no exception! I recently found a copy of Beezus and Ramona at the local used bookstore, and I picked it up to relive a bit of my childhood. As a child, I was drawn to the zest for life that Ramona brought to the page. However, on this go around, I found myself identifying with sweet, lovable Beezus. Her intelligent and quiet demeanor is such a contrast to that of Ramona's. I now have a younger sister and she is a lot like Ramona, so I can definitely see why Beezus gets so exasperated with her so often. This is a timeless story about the differences between sisters and the love that they share even when they don't like each other. This book, while heavily featuring Ramona, is more about Beezus and is told from her point of view. I'd recommend this book to young girls who have sisters that they feel like they just can't stand. It's relatable and timeless. Even though this book is over 50 years old (can you believe it!), it stands up to the test of time and is a standout volume of children's literature.
  • (4/5)
    This is about a girl named Ramona and how she is has a very creative imagination. Her older sister Beezus gets annoyed with her sometimes but they love each other. I recommend teachers to read this book to their students because it will help their students learn about how to act with teachers, parents, and siblings.
  • (4/5)
    Nine year old Beezus has a four year old sister named Ramona who drives her crazy. Beezus cannot enjoy anything on her own because Ramona wants to tag along and always ruins everything. She throws temper tantrums, doesn't listen or do what she is told and-- worst of all-- is cute and clever and full of imagination. It seems to Beezus that in the end, Ramona always gets her way. It is so unfair! AAAAh-- an older but goodie--the original was written in 1955 and some details are a little dated-- the theme sounds like something from shakespeare! Cleary is the master once again with this classic tale of sibling rivalry and the subtlety of family relations. This is the only Huggins/Quimby story told from big sister Beezus' point of view and as a big sister myself, i can sympathize. The littler ones are always cuter and there's no glory in keeping an eye on your little sister. (of course, Ramona thinks her sister gets to do everything!) This is a quiet tale the unwraps slowley-- Beezus takes her sister to the library where Ramona insists that the book she borrowed is hers. Ramona writes her name on every page to prove it is hers and Ramona has to pay for it. The sisters are very different-- Beezus the thoughtful and responsible older sister while Ramona is the carefree one full of bad behavior and imagination-- personality traits that are mirrored in the mother and aunt---something the reader does not fully realize until the birthday party at the end. A classic, gentle tale from a master storyteller.
  • (5/5)
    4P"I feel so mixed up, thought Beezus. Sometimes I don't like Ramona at all, and I'm supposed to like her because she's my sister, and . . . Oh, dear, even if she's little, can't she ever be more like other people's sisters?" p33This is not a radical change book.
  • (4/5)
    5starPAges 8 to 114-year-old spunky Ramona drives her older sister crazy with silly antics such as playing Gretel by putting her baby doll's head in the oven while Beezus's birthday cake is cooking, inviting kids over for a birthday party without letting her mom know, and "writing" her name in every page of a library book because she wanted to own it. First of the Ramona books."Beezus felt that the biggest trouble with four-year-old Ramona was that she was just plain exasperating. If Ramona drank lemonade through a straw, she blew into the straw as hard as she could to see what would happen. If she played with her finger paints in the front yard, she wiped her hands on the neighbors' cat. That was the exasperating sort of thing Ramona did. And then there was the way she behaved about her favorite book."
  • (4/5)
    I love Beverly Cleary and after reading all of the books in the Ramona series I decided to revisit this one because I couldn't remember it as well as the others. In reading it again I realized that this is the only one in the series that is written from the point of view of Beatrice "Beezus", Ramona's sister and, having been a little sister, that could be why I didn't remember this one as well. I loved reading about the relationship between these two sisters and think that Cleary completely captures the feeling of an older sibling (i was also a big sister). The combination of embarrassment and loving protectiveness is very true to the human heart of a child and I really enjoyed the little moments between the sisters both the difficult and the few tender ones. Great book for sisters of any age!
  • (5/5)
    I have always loved the Ramona books. They were the first chapter books I read as a child and I could not put them down. I specifically remember this book because I am an older sister and my little sis always bothered me. This is a great book for someone with a little sister to relate to. This book is also very humorous and I don't know a single girl that would not love it!I'm not sure that this would be a good book to bring into the classroom as it is geared more towards girls. I really do not think that boys would enjoy this. You could however relate this to some sort of family activity. Students could put together their family tree at home with pictures and paragraphs describing each family member. It is a great way to remember your family and a good way to share!
  • (3/5)
    Being a Ramona lover, I was glad to see this book that showed Beezus' perspective of her pesky little sister. It allowed me to sympathize more with the older sister, and yet did not diminish my enjoyment of Ramona and her ability to attract, and cause trouble.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book because the sisters are just like us!
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this book because Ramona is really annoying and she likes to imagine things. Also, Beezus is bossy and always gets angry at her. It just has so many funny parts in it. I just couldn’t stop listening to it.
  • (5/5)
    When beezus learned that she doesn’t have to love Ramona all the time
  • (4/5)
    Reading about Ramona's little mischievous activities really made me angry but overall good book 9/10 lol
  • (4/5)
    This is the first in Cleary's series of Ramona books.  I listened to it with my daughter at bedtimes.  In many ways my four-year old daughter IS Ramona Quimby, creative and mischief and sometimes seems indifferent to the chaos she causes.  So this is a very true to life book, and it feels oddly contemporary despite being published in 1955.  Unlike later books, this story is told from the point of view of Beezus who has to deal with a little sister who wants to hear an annoying book about steam shovel, colors in her library book, looks her friend's dog in the bathroom, invites neighborhood children to a party that no one else in the family knew about, and destroys not one but two of Beezus' birthday cakes.  Beezus has to deal with the guilt that sometimes she doesn't love Ramona.  Near the end of the book <spoiler alert> Beezus mother and Aunt Beatrice reminisce about having a similarly contentious relationship as children but are able to laugh about it as adults, giving Beezus some comfort.  It's a pretty brilliant book and I'm glad I'm getting to hear it now having missed it as a child.Favorite Passages:I am too a Merry Sunshine!
  • (4/5)
    A simply marvelous series that is only finally beginning to be dated just a tiny bit. Will always be worthy, though.
  • (4/5)
    This suck such a fun, playful read. Ramona is adorable and annoying in all the ways a sister can be! I spent to much time laughing through this.

    Your really feel for Beezus and the caught in the middle dilemma she is in but I can't help but cheer on the little sister. Her antics are fantastic! It made me grateful for the age gap between my brothers and I. I didn't have to deal with as much of this. Amusing as she was, Ramona was also a little terror that could drive anyone crazy.

    Great lessons for kids in this book. From learning right and wrong, to how to apologize, acceptance and what it really means to be a sister. I think kids can gain a lot from reading this book Especially if they have a sibling (older or younger).

    The relationships in this family are very real. Both the adults behavior and the kids. It was easy to relate to the different characters. The main thing that doesn't fit in todays world is the freedom and "safety" young children have. There is a distinct lack of adult supervision.

    Over great for elementary kids to read and enjoy. Lots of fun!
  • (3/5)
    The best way I can describe my thoughts about this book is that it is simply okay. I really like the depth of the characters and how they grow throughout the book, especially Ramona and Beezus. I also love the dialogue throughout the book, I think that it is believable and sounds genuine. While this story is fun, a lot of the discipline tactics of the parents seem very antiquated. Often in the book, Ramona is told to do things because that is just the way it is A repeated theme throughout the book is that Ramona will grow out of her "exasperating" behavior as the mother and Aunt Beatrice did. However, I do not think that losing one's childlike fascination with the world and the questioning, curiosity and creativity that comes with it is something that should be glorified to kids. I think that encouraging Ramona to keep her eclectic creativity should be included in the book, not the attitude of tolerating it until it is outgrown.
  • (5/5)
    The tale of two siblings who endure the trials and tribulations of childhood. I would use this in the classroom when learning about families, siblings, and how to handle our actions. I would have students draw their own families and tell their how family story.