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The Night Fairy

The Night Fairy

Escrito por Laura Amy Schlitz

Narrado por Michael Friedman


The Night Fairy

Escrito por Laura Amy Schlitz

Narrado por Michael Friedman

avaliações:
4/5 (19 avaliações)
Comprimento:
1 hora
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9781449824709
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

Newbery Medal winner Laura Amy Schlitz—New York Times best-selling author of Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! and A Drowned Maiden’s Hair—creates a magnificent tale about a tiny night fairy who loses her wings and can no longer fly. As Flory the fledgling fairy soars through the dark sky, a ravenous bat bites off her wings. Injured yet determined to live, she’s willing to do what it takes to survive—even if it means befriending a hungry squirrel and becoming a day fairy.

Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9781449824709
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Laura Amy Schlitz is a librarian and storyteller in Baltimore County, USA. She has worked as a costumer, actress and playwright, and her plays for young people have been produced in theatres all over the county. She has been awarded the Newbery Medal and numerous other literary awards. She is a New York Times bestselling author.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre The Night Fairy

4.1
19 avaliações / 16 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    my 6 year old loved this book gave it 5 stars! says u shod read it too
  • (3/5)
    Fans of fairy stories will certainly love it.
  • (4/5)
    Great adventure book for girls!
  • (4/5)
    A bat mistakes Flory the night fairy for an edible treat and smashes her wings, forcing her to crash-land in a garden and learn to be a day fairy, living in a birdhouse, gathering nuts and seeds by hand, and dashing through trees instead of flying. Flory is quick to use her stinging spell and a bit rude at times, but learns to make friends with a squirrely-headed squirrel named Skuggle. When the bat finds her again, he promises to fly her home, but first Flory must save the humming bird and her babies. Flory admits that she's not as good a friend to Skuggle as she could be, but doesn't make any conscious decision to change her behavior. Still, it's a relief to find a spunky fairy character who learns to make do with what she has. Delicate watercolor illustrations depict Flory as true-to-size at "two acorns tall," and will delight readers with their detail. This transitional chapter book is a sweet, light fantasy, perfect for readers who have outgrown picture book fairytales but aren't quite ready for The Secret Garden. Recommended for ages 7-10.
  • (4/5)
    Schlitz, Laura AmyThe Night FairyIllustrated by Angela Barrett. 2011. 128pp. $6.99 pbk. Candlewick Press. 978-0-7636-5295-1. Grades 1-4Flory is a night fairy, a softly glowing fairy who sleeps during the day and is awake at night. One night, a bat accidentally tries to eat her wings, and Flory falls wingless to the ground. Flory must choose how to live her life now that her wings are injured and she cannot fly, and she decides to be a day fairy instead of a night fairy. She makes friends along the way, including a squirrel who is always hungry, and from the moment she sees her first hummingbird, she wants a hummingbird to fly her around on its back. Flory thinks she will get her chance to have a hummingbird helper when a hummingbird accidentally gets trapped in a spider's web, but the hummingbird's reaction and a chance encounter with a bat will give Flory even more new friends than she had expected. The blue-tinged, painterly illustrations add a soft, ethereal tone to the story, and the story of a fairy trying to find her place in the world will interest children looking for a new kind of fairy tale. Recommended for magic enthusiasts who like their fairy stories with some complexity.
  • (4/5)
    My first thought when starting this books was that it is meant to be read aloud. It would make a great multiple part story for any child with a touch of magic. I also loved that fairies aren't portrayed as sweet, kind, and gentle. We see how Flory grows and changes, there is a message there but it is subtle and secondary to the story.
  • (4/5)
    This book is an ideal night time story. It tells the story of Flory, a little night fairy,while she ventured out one night ans was mistaken for a moth. A bat made the mistake and attacked her leaving her wings borken and unuseable. Flory then finds herself in a giantess’s garden and must learn to adapt to a life without wings. This story follows Flory’s adventures in trying to cope in a strange flightless new world.Int he classroom setting I would use this one as a story starter. Its just past the picture book level so its perfect for 1st and 2nd graders. It does use pictures to break up the text. I would have the students try to think about things they would no longer do it thye no longer had wings such as Flory. How they would adapt and overcome. I would also incorporate a art lesson into it and have them draw a picture of Flory without her wings inher new world.
  • (4/5)
    From the 2008 Newbery Medal Award winner, Laura Amy Schlitz, comes the children’s novel “The Night Fairy”. This novel has also won the Parents Magazine Best Book of the Year.“The Night Fairy” is the perfect book to read to your children at night. It follows the life of a little night fairy named Flory. One night when venturing out Flory was mistaken for a moth and was attacked by a bat. This horrible mistake left her wings ruined and unusable. She finds herself in a giantess’s garden and must learn a new life without her wings. This story follows Flory’s adventures in trying to cope in a strange new world.This little novel is perfect for children who are starting to venture past picture books. This novel is not to long as to intimidate them and has beautiful pictures throughout it to break up the text. Parents will enjoy reading this to their children or having it read to them by their children. The feisty Flory will excite her readers and stimulate their imaginations.
  • (4/5)
    This children's novella tells the story of a night fairy who loses her wings shortly after her birth and is forced to navigate the perils of the garden she lives in ranging from bats to squirrels to spiders without the benefit of flight or even much of her magical powers. It is nicely written and illustrated, a more "realistic" and coming of age version of the typical fairy tale than a fantasy/fable version.
  • (4/5)
    Third person fantasy about, “Flory,” a night fairy who must adapt to her new “day fairy” status when a bat accidentally nips her wings, and causes her to live in a new giantess’ garden. Great example of living within changing circumstances, empathy, and helping others. High-level vocabulary discussed (such as suet, torpor) as well as habits and environments of various garden animals. Gorgeous color illustrations, rich with detail to bring this new world to life for the reader.
  • (3/5)
    This is a beautifully written and illustrated story about the life of a fairy. Flory is a delicate night fairy but loses the ability to fly because of a broken wing. When she was very young she was nearly eaten by a bat. Because of this incident she decides to become a day fairy instead of a night fairy so that she can take care of herself and survive life in a Giantess’s garden without having to worry about the bats and her other enemies. Because of her kindness and compassion towards others and her willingness to help others, Flory makes many new friends. Along with her magical powers and her friends, Flory has many adventures that teach her how to survive in the garden. This is an absolutely beautiful story with very detailed watercolor illustrations that really add some warmth to the story. The Night Fairy is a fabulous story for anyone who has a love of fairies and a great imagination. Grades 2-4
  • (5/5)
    Delightful from the very first sentence. Love the bellowing fairy and all the everyday magical creatures sharing her garden. Fleet illustrations usher one back to childhood.
  • (4/5)
    A short and sweet story about a fairy whose wings are injured when she is very young, so she must learn to befriend animals to get places. At first she’s only interested in helping herself, but she learns to care about the other creatures around her and even the scary ones turn out to not be so bad.
  • (4/5)
    After a run-in with a bat leaves Flory without her wings, she finds that her whole lifestyle is in for a change. For instance, she falls off the tree she has been living in and ends up in the giantess's yard. There she must learn how to survive - find a new home and without her wings, that means work. Angry at the bats, mad at the night, and annoyed with herself, Flory decides she won't be a night fairy anymore--she'll be a day fairy. With her trusty dagger and an always-hungry squirrel, she's off on an unforgettable adventure.What a sweet little tale awaits you in the pages of The Night Fairy. This will definitely appeal to little girls... because really, what little girl doesn't dream of being a fairy?Flory is one tough fairy... I mean tough as nails. She is not shy about threatening any foe with her dagger and, at times, due to her lack of being around other fairy's, her demeanor with her fellow garden dwellers can be rather rude, demanding and even stand-offish. But you can definitely see her growth throughout the story as she not only learns to survive in her new world but she also learns to be a friend.The story comes in a slim volume with stunningly, enchanting artwork by Angela Barrett. The pages were sleek and shiny and you had some thick glittery pages at the end of the book... very nice all-around package that makes you want to display it on your bookshelf. This is a story that can be enjoyed by everyone (no matter the age) and believe me, those of you who do pick it up will cherish it.
  • (4/5)
    A wingless, yet dauntless fairy with tangled curls and a resolute attitude, Flory is a heroine you will love. An intrepid adventurer no taller than a pair of acorns, nothing can stop Flory once she sets her mind - not daylight, not squirrels, not even bats."Flory nodded briskly. 'I can do that,' she said, though she knew how prickly barberry bushes were, and she feared the climb. ... She yanked her arm away from the spiderweb. The sticky thread left a red welt on her arm. Flory was not going to fuss over a minor wound like that. She set her teeth, turned her back on the hummingbird, and set forth on her quest."An action-packed magical journey with nature inspired illustrations of the plucky Flory, diminutive heroine of The Night Fairy.
  • (5/5)
    This is a small story with a spunky fairy, nature, friends, adventure and great illustrations--what more would you want?