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avaliações:
4.5/5 (53 avaliações)
Comprimento:
6 horas
Lançado em:
Sep 21, 2012
ISBN:
9781470323721
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

Teens and pre-teens flock to any new offering from New York Times best-selling author Gordon Korman. Told through multiple viewpoints, Ungifted follows Donovan Curtis and his year at a magnet school for gifted and talented kids. Thanks to an administrative foul-up, the decidedly mediocre student Donovan finds himself enrolled in the Academy of Scholastic Distinction. Out of place and out of luck, Donovan joins the robotics team. And while he learns a few lessons from his gifted classmates, he also teaches a few of his own.
Lançado em:
Sep 21, 2012
ISBN:
9781470323721
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Gordon Korman published his first book at age fourteen and since then has written more than ninety middle grade and teen novels. Favorites include the New York Times bestselling Ungifted, Supergifted, The Unteachables, Pop, Schooled, and the Masterminds series. Gordon lives with his family on Long Island, New York. You can visit him online at www.gordonkorman.com.

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4.4
53 avaliações / 23 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    Korman's dive into middle school robotics skates by some flaws to deliver a mildly heart-warming story about a trouble-maker named Donnie who turns the definition of "gifted" on its head. After a prank gone wrong, Donnie is inadvertently enrolled in the Academy for Scholastic Distinction, a school for intelligently gifted children of the district. The teachers and students all know that Donnie is not traditionally gifted, but the case is made in nearly every chapter that Donnie is socially gifted. However, few teachers fail to recognize Donnie's giftedness and appear to be out to "get" him, a failure on Korman's part to portray today's schoolteachers in a positive and encouraging light.Ungifted is fascinating in its discussions about robotics; it is indeed an entirely competitive world of its own, and the ending could have done with more description about the culminating competition. While Korman's handling of the ending is unsettling and unsatisfactory, at best, readers can be assured that overall Ungifted is a book that one can recommend with no reservations to a middle school student. Korman writes about bullying, fitting in, and the pressures of adolescence without resorting to unsavory elements like so many other novels.
  • (3/5)

    This and other reviews can be found on Reading Between Classes

    Cover Impressions: The cover is super cute. The colors are great and the image of the robot is fun. I can see where this would appeal to kids.

    The Gist: Donovan Curtis doesn't know why he does the things that he does. He just gets an itch and before he knows it, he is in a world of trouble. When his biggest mistake yet inadverntantly leads to a mix up that gets him labeled as "Gifted", Donovan is thrust into a world of the super-smart and the super-geeky. As he struggles to fly under the radar, he becomes more involved than he ever thought he would and starts to see the Academy Geeks in a whole new light.

    Review:

    Ungifted is a well-written middle grade novel. It is a fun, light story that is perfect for young readers and easy enough for reluctant readers. The plot progresses steadily and has some very light hearted moments. I enjoyed watching Donovan as realized that the gifted kids were fun and interesting and that they were his true friends. Some of his actions left Donnie a little unlikeable, but he did manage to grow by the end of the novel.

    The other characters are cute, if a little stereotypical. I enjoyed Noah the most and was amused by his constant yearning to be expelled from the Academy. Chloe was also a cute character, but I felt the romantic element a little unnecessary and distracting.

    I wasn't a big fan of the alternating narrative. Perhaps if it had been less random and had a little more development among fewer characters, I would have enjoyed it more. I also noticed an odd undercurrent of public school bashing. Admittedly, as a Canadian, I am not fluent in the issues plaguing the American school system, however, as a teacher, I felt a little insulted. We do the best we can with what we are given and I felt that the author wasn't giving that process credit.

    I can see this book appealing to boys (as most of Gordon Korman's books do) and being an enjoyable read for those reluctant readers.

    Teaching/Parental Notes:

    Age: 10 and up
    Gender: Both
    Sex: None
    Violence: Bullying
    Inappropriate Language: None
    Substance Use/Abuse: None
  • (4/5)
    Human error winds up sending a trouble-making boy to a gifted school where he brings an element of "normal" to the collection of geniuses he meets. My first thought was that I'd seen this plot done in an episode of The Simpsons, but this time, the wayward student is determined to make it work. It's hard for me to put my finger on my feelings for this book. It feels like the reader is floating along with Donovan as he navigates circumstances as they arrive. At times the book is serious, funny, or somewhat outrageous, and Noah has landed on my list of favourite literary characters.
  • (5/5)
    This books is about a boy named Donovan who throws a stick at the globe on his school's atlas statue. The globe rolls down the hill and break his school gym. The principal talks to Donovan and writes his name on a slip of paper. When Donovan gets home there is a letter in the mail. It says he got into the gifted program. It turns out the principal wrote his name on the gifted list by mistake. How will Donovan make it in the gifted program? You have to read the book to find out. I liked the book because it had a lot of cliffhangers and humor. I enjoyed reading about all the adventures Donovan has. The lesson in this book is to never give up. I recommend this book to people who like books that show different perspectives. I also recommend it to middle schoolers because they can relate to Donovan who is a 7th grader.
  • (5/5)
    Gordon Korman is always a reliable hit with elementary students, and this title is no different. Ungifted will appeal to boys especially, as it focuses on a student whom some might consider a "loser," who is able to succeed even though he at first seems to be completely out of his depth. With well-drawn characters and enough development to make it more than just a school romp, this is a great addition to any school library.
  • (3/5)
    One of the [many] things that impresses me about Gordon Korman is how much credit he gives his audience. He writes these zany stories, but they have a lot of depth to them at the same time. And Ungifted is no exception.

    The story follows a kid, Donnie, who accidentally gets transferred to a gifted school despite the fact that he is definitely not. The superintendent just wrote down Donnie's name on the wrong piece of paper. Whoops. Gifted.

    Now Donnie has to manage his classes without anyone clueing in that he shouldn't be there. There's a robotics competition, an awkward school dance, and a whole host of... quirky classmates.

    (Sidebar about characterization: I'm a little conflicted over the portrayal of Donnie's gifted classmates. They kind of feel like stereotypical nerds, but their competitiveness and social awkwardness also felt really... familiar. Maybe larger-than-life would be how I'd describe them? Honestly, they felt realistic, if a little exaggerated. The only character I didn't 100% believe was one of the adults, the superintendent, and that's only because he seemed to break character towards the end.)

    Basically, this book is a madcap school adventure, a fun and funny read.

    But there's also more to it than that. Because without getting too preachy or obvious about it, Gordon Korman explores some issues with the school system. He contrasts the environment the gifted kids get with the sad, underfunded, regular classrooms. He shows how being treated like you're smart and being given a more enriching environment changes how you learn. And he also gets into the tremendous amount of pressure that kids feel once they've been categorized as smart.

    Basically, Ungifted was a fun book with some surprisingly deep educational themes and issues. This isn't the first book I've read of Korman's to address issues with school. And I think that's really cool, especially given that a lot of middle grade readers spend a huge portion of their lives in classrooms. It's nice to see Korman giving schools a nuanced treatment and exploring the educational issues that students -- gifted or not -- can encounter.
  • (4/5)
    Donovan Curtis earns placement into the gifted program through a careless administrative mistake, resulting from his too-frequent prankster activities. At first, differences in IQ scores and ideas about "fun" separate him from his new schoolmates, but as the students work together on a team project, they begin to see past their initial judgments and learn to appreciate the talents of others.
  • (4/5)
    This book was engaging but sometimes I felt like already knew what was going to happen. Like when Donovan was in trouble because he had knocked over the statue , he was switch to a gifted class( made for smart peoples)
  • (5/5)
    Noah is so dumb because of Donavan showing him YouTube uwu
  • (4/5)
    Korman at his best in this very funny book for middle schoolers. 2014 SSYRA
  • (4/5)
    Korman always finds the unusual to write about in his middle school novels. Donvan, who always finds himself on the wrong end of trouble, suddenly finds himself in the school for the gifted. Now, obviously this is a BIG mistake, there's no way he gifted! But as he makes friends with the nerds in the school robotics program, they discover giftedness he never considered. They are so academic, and he introduces them to new ways of thinking, including You Tube. When the mistaken placement is discovered, just as the robotics team is about to win the championship, Donovan is sent back to regular school. And to his surprise, he missed the gifted program. And they really miss him.
  • (4/5)
    A little bit simplistic - it covers so many characters, issues, and themes in a quick read. And a little implausible - for example, my complaint when I was a teacher in the Midwest was that so much money was spent on the children with disabilities that the gifted kids didn't get any real support. But there's plenty of money for the gifted kids here...

    But still, a fun & sensitive read for upper MG/ lower YA and for the adults who love them, no matter where their talents lie.

    PS. The students at the Academy were stereo-typically nerdy and focused, but I got the sense that Korman is saying that had to do with the community & the school district. They haven't been given permission to find out if they can also be creative, or to explore YouTube, or to kick back at all. Witness Chloe's passion for a school dance, or Noah's attempts to 'fail' out of the gifted program. Witness the entrance requirements for the Academy, that focus so much on the score of an IQ test, and not on grades or teacher recommendations or extra-curr. projects.
  • (4/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    Summary: The book starts out when middle school troublemaker Donovan Curtis pulls his biggest prank yet, and finally thinks he has gone to far. However, instead of getting expelled, Donovan is sent to the Academy of Scholastic Distinction, or ASD. He thinks he is safe until he realizes he doesn't possess the gifts that any of the other student have. After failing all his classes, the teachers and students alike begin to become suspicious. Donovan thinks he is done for until he enters the Robotics Tournament. Before urnament, his realizes that they do need his talents as well as their own the win.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (4/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    Donovan Curtis's very average 8th grade life takes a sudden drastic turn when he good-naturedly wacks a statue at the top of a hill overlooking the middle school gymnasium with a branch, seting off a chain of events. The gym's glass entrance and wooden floor are trashed and Donovan's is mistakenly and miraculously sent to the School of Academic Distinction instead of serving a sentence for massive vandalism. Although he doesn't understand anything taught at the school, Donovan does contribute something all the gifted students do not have- a touch of normalcy, as well great driving for the Robotix team's robot and even an answer to their summer school dilemma. Chapters are written by different people and keep the dialogue interesting as Donovan hides out at the gifted school and endears himself to the group. An excellent read for the reluctant reader and one that boys will especially enjoy. 280 pages and appropriate for grades 5-8.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (3/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    Gordon Korman tends to be safe bet for a good tween book, and this book is no exception.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (4/5)
    Donovan Curtis is a kid that acts without thinking and is used to paying the consequences for his actions when they catch up to him. This time the result of the action was very unexpected and very BAD. When he manages to break a statue and send “the world” crashing through the glass doors and into the gym during a game he is hauled to the superintendents office where his name is taken to be dealt with later... But, the name is picked up with the list of GT kids that are being transferred to the GT school so he is sent with them as the superintendent cannot remember his name.At the GT school he is placed in the robotics club as they are all in his homeroom. Here he meets typical GT kids that stress over everything or go to the other extreme and want to prove they don’t know so they can be treated like “normal” kids.He helps solve a scheduling problem that would have caused the GT kids to take summer school which helps him get on the good side of some of the classmates, but even though he is trying harder than he had ever tried in his life is not passing classes with acceptable grades.He eventually gets caught after somebody hacks the computer to “retake” the GT test for him - somehow they don’t realize there aren’t test scores to begin with as he never took a test to get to the GT school. The student who wants to fail and be “normal” takes the blame for hacking the computer though he didn’t do it so he WOULD be kicked out of the GT school.
  • (5/5)
    Donovan Curtis gets into trouble and lands in the superintendent's office who put his name on a list...the wrong list. Donovan is an average student and a trouble maker, but ends up with his name on the list of kids to transfer to the Academy of Scholastic Distinction for gifted kids.Imagine being tossed into a school with a bunch of super smart kids. As you would guess he runs into trouble academically and with the class project of building a robot for the statewide competitiion. He fails at everything they put before him until they find out he is a wizard with the joystick.Donovan changes the school, but not as you would guess. The school changes Donovan, but not as you would guess.I've discovered the New York Times best-selling author Gordon Korman and feel like I've been given a present. He's written not only this book, but over seventy other books.
  • (4/5)
    When Donovan hit the Atlas statue with a tree branch, he really just meant it to make a loud, echoey clang. He had no way of knowing that the 400-pound-globe on Atlas's shoulders was held on with one single rusty bolt. Donovan didn't mean to send the ball careening down the hill, through the glass doors, and across the gym floor. So when a disciplinary screw-up sends him to the Academy for Scholastic Distinction, he didn't really mean for that to happen, either--but it's a great place to hide out for a while. It doesn't take long for anyone to figure out that Donovan doesn't belong with the geniuses at his new school--but Donovan does have some gifts the geniuses don't have. But it'll take more than joystick skills and a pregnant sister to keep him in the gifted school.

    Really enjoyed this--sweet and sincere while still being goofy and funny. Donovan seems like a real 8th grader, with impulse-control issues and a prankster attitude. His immediate reaction to his new classmates is to see them all as huge, hopeless nerds, but he quickly comes to care about them, defending them against his thuggish old-school friends. He tries hard, and manages to be a really decent kid under all the mischief.

    Definitely one to recommend to middle-schoolers; the brightly-colored robot cover should help it find an audience.

    [Aside: as an adult reader, there are plenty of plot holes big enough to drive their robot through, and, like Schooled, Ungifted is plagued with similarly unrealistic expectations of what middle-schoolers are like. Still, it's charming and uplifting, as long as you don't think too hard about it.]

    [Aside #2: I assume Korman doesn't have kids of his own, given the lack of fuss and drama made about a 4-hour labor, except to compare it against the 90-minute labor of a dog birthing 4 puppies, and say that the dog had it easy. A 4-hour labor is unusually speedy, though the book makes it appear that it took forever.]
  • (3/5)
    Donovan is the class cut-up. When he finds himself in over his head after one prank too many, he miraculously gets the opportunity to hide out in the gifted and talented school.Donovan is not gifted in the traditional academic sense, but that doesn't mean he doesn't have a special talents. When Donovan put is special skills to good use, who knows what can happen? This story is told through multiple points of view and proves that we aren't always what we seem.
  • (4/5)
    Due to an administrative mix-up, troublemaker Donovan Curtis is sent to the Academy of Scholastic Distinction, a special program for gifted and talented students, after pulling a major prank at middle school.
  • (5/5)
    Epic, hilarious, classic Korman! Donovan is the kid who gets an idea and just does or says whatever... immediately. Without thinking. He's been voted most likely to end up in jail, and has become a lifer in school detention. The afternoon his teacher sneaks off to watch the junior high championship game, Donovan's buddies bust him out of detention, and he ends up whacking the globe off the hilltop statue of Atlas holding up the world. Unfortunately, the giant bronze globe ends up demolishing the glass doors and front entrance of the gym, along with a sizeable portion of the gym floor, and terrifying the packed crowd at the game. After being nabbed by the superintendent himself, Donovan is sent home to await his expulsion papers.... and instead, there's a letter that arrives stating he has passed all of the exams and qualifications for the Academy of Scholastic Distinction, and his transfer is effective immediately. Donovan can barely put a decent paragraph together and is lucky if all of his grades are above C average (actually that usually means he's sitting next to someone a lot smarter than him or his buddies, the two Daniels). The Academy is an amazing high tech facility with incredibly smart kids and teachers, and the only way Donovan's going to be able to hide from the consequences of his massive bronze and glass mess is if he can manage to find a way to stay in the Academy. Turns out his only talent is xbox related, and it's the one talent missing in the school robotics team -- they can build it, program it, modify it... but none of them have the gamer instincts to drive it to the win, or the ability to see beyond the math and physics and engineering into the fun! Between that and Donovan offering his very pregnant sister up as the class "Human Growth and Development" project so that they don't have to take summer school for that subject, Donovan thinks it just might work. Add a raucous middle school dance, a phenomenally epic robotics competition takedown, and chapters from every different voice in the book, this is laugh out loud funny, with enough heart to keep you cheering for every single character. 6th grade and up.
  • (4/5)
    Donovan has a reputation as a troublemaker and a bit of a slacker. When an administrative mix-up has him transferred to the district's magnet school instead of in terrible trouble for his latest lapse in judgement, his life starts to change. The novel is told from the points of view of various characters. And while Donovan is not gifted in the traditional sense, his gifts do in fact enhance the lives of those he encounters. This was a fun, quick read that would make a good read aloud and might lead to good discussion for groups.
  • (4/5)
    Donovan is an ordinary kid, always in trouble for his impulsive behavior. When a typically thoughtless act severely damages the auditorium at his middle school, he is accidentally sent to the school for gifted kids. Donovan knows he'll never fit in there, but it makes a handy place to hide from the angry superintendent. And all his years of playing video games turns out to be very helpful to the robotics team. But the scam can't last forever; the other students were suspicious from the first day, the teachers from the first week.Wacky and fun. If you like Korman's Bruno and Boots books, you'll like this. Add half a star if you're an actual kid.