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Anastasia Krupnik

Anastasia Krupnik

Escrito por Lois Lowry

Narrado por C. J. Critt


Anastasia Krupnik

Escrito por Lois Lowry

Narrado por C. J. Critt

avaliações:
4/5 (22 avaliações)
Comprimento:
2 horas
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 1993
ISBN:
9781436136921
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

Children and adults alike will delight in this heartwarming tale of a precocious girl who discovers, to her dismay, that her parents are about to have a baby. Anastasia’s hilarious lists of her likes and dislikes—sprinkled throughout the story—offer a lighthearted counterpoint to poignant moments that reveal the worries and fears of a fourth grader.
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 1993
ISBN:
9781436136921
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

LOIS LOWRY, author of over thirty novels and twice winner of the Newbery Medal for The Giver and Number the Stars,was born on the 20th of March 1937 in Hawaii. Her father was an Army dentist and the family lived all over the world. She went to Brown University, but left to get married and a raise a family of four children. She settled in Maine, and returned to college receiving a degree from the University of Southern Maine. She fulfilled a childhood dream when she started writing in the 1970s.

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22 avaliações / 22 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    Anastasia Krupnik is an only child, her mother an artist, and her father a college professor. She is bright and precocious. She keeps an ever changing list of things she likes and things she does not like. Among her various issues: a teacher who doesn't like her poetry because it doesn't rhyme; a roudy black boy in her school who she has a crush on; her grandmother, who can't remember who Anastasia is; and most of all, a baby brother on the way.Anastasia is smart and sweet enough to be likable, but she has the realistic problems that ten-year-olds have... she can be impatient, pig-headed, selfish, and impolite as well. Her parents are nicely developed characters themselves, too. (Many YA novels portray parents that are rather one-dimensional.) It was laugh out loud funny at times, and occasionally I shed a few tears as well.Hope the others in the series are as good as this one.
  • (3/5)
    The not very purposeful diary like experience of the delightful A. Krupnik. Fun and funny and cool.
  • (4/5)
    Anastasia is an adorable, likeable, relatable character. She reminds me too much of myself at 10. I adore her outlook on her life, her parents, school, and friends. And her little green notebook, where she writes things she hates and things she loves - and how those things often change columns - is marvelous. As for her adjusting to a new sibling - Lowry wrote that well. And when Anastasia learned to deal with growing old and dying, Lowry allows us to learn alongside her. I recommend this for any middle-school child, in particular those dealing with new siblings or death of family members, but also, for anyone like me, who just enjoys escaping the adult life for a time.
  • (3/5)
    I never read these books as a kid - not sure why, just didn't get around to them. It's interesting reading about what life would be like for a pre-teen in the time that I was a baby. I read this book while on a plane, and it was distracting enough. A bit dated, sure, but still pretty interesting. Definitely shows all the back and forth that goes through a kid's mind.
  • (4/5)
    Very much fun. It lived up to all my hopes for a younger children's book from Lois Lowry. The development of the "things I love" and "things I hate" lists as things would move between the lists with the progression of the story was interesting to watch and brought smiles. I loved her poem.
  • (3/5)
    The innocence, awkwardness, and candor of Anastasia and her contemporaries is handled with Lowry's seemingly effortless ease and humor, making these books a great read for anyone with a reading level at or above elementary school level.
  • (5/5)
    Anastasia hates her name, her teacher, her freckles, liver, her parents, and boys. Originally published in 1979, Anastasia is a typical average 10 year old girl learning what it means to grow up. I truly loved this book!
  • (4/5)
    My GoodReads friends were right, as usual. This is a funny, warm, delightful book. Anastasia is a treat, her parents are very real, and the whole package strikes exactly the right note.
  • (5/5)
    I'm re-reading all the Anastasia books. Despite owning most of them when I was younger, they, like all of my other belongings, mysteriously disappeared. I'm almost positive this is going to be five-star rating, but I'm waiting until I finish, since I've forgotten a lot.
  • (5/5)
    It's weird, I didn't really think of these books as that funny when I was a kid. Anastasia reminds me a lot of myself at that age, so I probably just thought it seemed normal.

    But now! I was reading this at lunch and I had to stop because I kept laughing and my co-workers were staring at me.

    For example:
    "Anastasia had a small pink wart in the middle of her left thumb. She found her wart very pleasing. It had appeared quite by surprise, shortly after her tenth birthday, on a morning when nothing else interesting was happening, and it was the first wart she had ever had, or seen.

    "It's the loveliest color I've seen in a wart," her mother, who had seen others, said with admiration.

    "Warts, you know," her father had told her, "have a kind of magic to them. they come and go without any reason at all, rather like elves."


    I love her parents (and how terrifying is it that her mother and I are now the same age?). They are hilarious and awesome.

    Oh yeah, and then you might cry at the end part.

  • (5/5)
    A delightful story about Anastasia, age 10 and her family, her mother who is an artist, her father a college professor, her grandmother in a nursing home and her baby brother on the way. Anastasia is smart, funny and deliciously human. A beautiful, quick read for ages 6 - 8. Also would be good for parents to read aloud.
  • (5/5)
    Even though I haven't read it since the 6th grade (1995) it was still a good book. And at 100 pages, I remember it taking forever to read the first time around though. While definitely geared at children, I didn't feel silly for reading it. The story dealt with first loves, changes at home, and even death; not too bad for so short a book.
  • (4/5)
    This was a great story-it reminds me of the Alice books by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor. This is a straightforward story of a 10 year old girl told from her point of view. The entire story is like being inside of her diary, and its interesting to see how she sees the world around her. I heard that there's more in this series and I'm definitely going to check them out, I think they are great reads for young readers.
  • (4/5)
    Anastasia is a precocious 10 year old who really likes to write things down in her green notebook. Her mother is going to have a baby, and Anastasia is not really sure how she feels about that. I remember really liking the Anastasia books when I was younger, and through LT I have found that there were a few I've missed. I acquired them all and am now reading through them again. They are not quite as entertaining to me as an adult, but I still found this one enjoyable. I still really appreciate the way Anastasia's parents treat her and that the author doesn't try too hard to make her narrator "kid-like".
  • (4/5)
    Anastasia Krupnik is the only child of a professor and a painter, and she makes lists of the things that have happened, the things that she likes, and the things that she hates in the year that she is 10 years old. It is fun to see how her lists of important events, likes, and dislikes evolve as the year progresses. And as someone who has spent time in Boston, it was great fun to read the references to Boston (though some things have changed since the book was written in 1979!). Anastasia is drawn realistically and well. I especially liked the poem she was assigned to write for class, and her teacher's reaction. A necessary addition to any children's library collection.
  • (3/5)
    Funny. Young girls could relate to Anastasia's experiences with her family, and classmates.
  • (3/5)
    The innocence, awkwardness, and candor of Anastasia and her contemporaries is handled with Lowry's seemingly effortless ease and humor, making these books a great read for anyone with a reading level at or above elementary school level.
  • (4/5)
    A fun book for young girls. It teaches a nice lesson without being too obvious about it, and the writing is great (not that I'd expect anything less from Lois Lowry). I wish I'd read the whole series as a kid instead of as a 20-something-year-old. My only hesitation to giving this a blanket recommendation to all elementary school kids is that some of the language was a little surprising for a book this level. Parents may want to screen it first (it's a very quick read). I don't think it's that bad, though.
  • (4/5)
    Throughout the entire book we see the main character, Anastasia, go through a huge change. This provides the book with an amazing level of character development. In the beginning, she starts off being mean and not interested in having her mother be pregnant, but by the end she is very excited to become a sister. The plot in this story is very likely to happen. This makes this book a good example of a realistic fiction because students can relate to this book.
  • (2/5)
    Anastasia is an annoying spoiled 10 yr old girl that is very self centered. As an adult I'm not very drawn to this book, and I don't think I would like it as an adult.
  • (3/5)
    Anastasia is a quirky 10 year old, who likes making lists, but is fickle about everything else. Entertaining yet average series.
  • (4/5)
    Falling in love for the first time. A new baby brother on the way. Beginning to understand her forgetful, elderly grandmother. There's plenty of new stuff going on for a ten-year-old named Anastasia Krupnik by author Lois Lowry.Well! Anastasia's pretty liberal about identifying everything she doesn't like, so I don't feel bad starting out with cons for this middle grade read from the 1970s.Anastasia is smart in an academic and bookish way, but she also has quite a smart mouth at times, just downright disrespectful. Her writer-artist-type parents tend not to make a thing of it, and with an especially quirky father who's okay with cussing in front of his daughter (yes, the story includes an actual "would've been bleeped out on network TV" cuss word—twice) and letting his daughter sip his wine and slurp the foam from his beers, going with the flow of his child's smart mouth is understandable for his character.Also, maybe I grew up with kids who grew up pretty fast, but even with Anastasia's smarts, some of her experiences seem littler-kiddish to me. This isn't the only middle grade book that's given me that impression lately, but it isn't something I noticed the first time I read this story. Granted, I think I was only eight or nine then.So, I almost feel guilty that I enjoyed the book more this time than I did as a kid. (Grownup nostalgia, partly?) It's a funny read in a dry and offhand kind of way, and it's also got some truly poignant moments. Anastasia becomes more likable late in the story, and the ending is wonderful.Good thing, when my younger self read the book, it didn't make me think I could get away with being a smart aleck, and I didn't repeat the story's cuss word to anybody. My adult self plans to visit or revisit more books in this series.