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The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto: A Novel

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto: A Novel


The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto: A Novel

avaliações:
4.5/5 (55 avaliações)
Comprimento:
9 horas
Editora:
Lançado em:
Nov 10, 2015
ISBN:
9780062420022
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

Mitch Albom creates his most unforgettable fictional character—Frankie Presto, the greatest guitarist to ever walk the earth—in this magical novel about the bands we join in life and the power of talent to change our lives.

An epic story of the greatest guitar player to ever live, and the six lives he changed with his magical blue strings.

In Albom's most sweeping novel yet, the voice of Music narrates the tale of its most beloved disciple, young Frankie Presto, a war orphan raised by a blind music teacher in a small Spanish town. At nine years old, Frankie is sent to America in the bottom of a boat. His only possession is an old guitar and six precious strings.

But Frankie's talent is touched by the gods, and his amazing journey weaves him through the musical landscape of the 20th century, from classical to jazz to rock and roll, with his stunning talent affecting numerous stars along the way, including Hank Williams, Elvis Presley, Carole King, Wynton Marsalis and even KISS.

Frankie becomes a pop star himself. He makes records. He is adored. But his gift is also his burden, as he realizes, through his music, he can actually affect people's futures-with one string turning blue whenever a life is altered.

At the height of his popularity, Frankie Presto vanishes. His legend grows. Only decades later, does he reappear-just before his spectacular death—to change one last life.

With its Forest Gump-like romp through the music world, The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto is a classic in the making. A lifelong musician himself, Mitch Albom delivers a remarkable novel, infused with the message that "everyone joins a band in this life" and those connections change us all.

The complete list of narrators includes Mitch Albom, Roger McGuinn, Ingrid Michaelson, John Pizzarelli, Paul Stanley, George Guidall, Mike Hodge, Robin Miles, Christian Baskous, Tony Chiroldes, Kevin O'Neil, Adriana Sananes, Ken Brown, and Sarab Kamoo.

A HarperAudio production.

Editora:
Lançado em:
Nov 10, 2015
ISBN:
9780062420022
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Mitch Albom is a bestselling author, screenwriter, playwright and nationally syndicated columnist. The author of five consecutive #1 New York Times bestsellers, his books have collectively sold more than thirty-three million copies in forty-two languages worldwide. Tuesdays With Morrie, which spent four straight years atop the New York Times list, is now the bestselling memoir of all time. Four of Albom’s books, including Morrie, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, For One More Day, and Have a Little Faith, have been made into highly acclaimed TV movies for ABC. Oprah Winfrey produced Tuesdays With Morrie, which claimed four Emmy awards including a best actor nod for Jack Lemmon in the lead role. Albom has founded six charities in and around Detroit, including the first-ever twenty-four-hour medical clinic for homeless children in America, and also operates an orphanage in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti. Albom lives with his wife, Janine, in metropolitan Detroit.

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55 avaliações / 23 Análises
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  • (5/5)
    WOW!! I wish I could give this book 10 stars, 20 for that matter - something that would help convey just how incredible, wonderful, and amazing this story truly is. It has it all and the words are written with such fluidity, they seem to melt off the page straight into your heart. This is definitely a book any book lover should read for themselves.To say Frankie had a rough start in life would be putting it mildly - every time he had even the smallest sense of stability, he was uprooted and forced to start a new. But even so, by the tender age of 4 his talent was obvious, at age nine he was sent to America with only a few meager possessions and his trusty guitar. It would be with this guitar and his amazing talent he would touch the lives of so many people. The "magic" strings that turn blue when he's touched a life - he has no control over. Sometimes he feels it is more a curse than a blessing and it doesn't keep him from dealing with his own demons. We are given a front row seat to Frankie's personal journey - you can almost feel his longing as he aches to be with his one true love, Aurora. He had fame and fortune, but that's not what he wanted, not what would give him peace within his heart and soul. The strength of their love would be tested again and again and it's not until he chooses to walk away into obscurity does he realize "Music" will lead him to the peace he seeks. The story moves through the 20th century - from the Vietnam War to Hurricane Katrina..along the way he meets musicians that will go on to become megastars in their own right - Hank Williams, Paul Stanley and Elvis to name a few. His music is incredible, but the effect he has on people is miraculous. (the reader too)Marketed as fiction, it certainly reads more like literature - masterfully written. There are no slow places, lags in narration, or boring dialogue.It's hard to explain how it all comes together to form one of the most fantastic stories I've read in years. I'll go so far as to say this is my new favorite book...hands down. It touches something inside you, almost like Frankie's music touched so many. It's engaging, interesting and unlike anything, you will find on bookshelves today. Mitch Albom has a way with words...the ability to connect the reader to his characters in deep, meaningful ways that will stay with you long after the last page is turned. If you are a reader - Read This Book. This is one of those rare stories that will be read, re-read, and talked about for years. Grab a blanket, some tissue, and your favorite drink - cuddle up with Frankie Presto... it will be the most enjoyable reading session you've experienced in years.Happy Reading,RJ
  • (4/5)
    Cleverly written. Narrated by "Music", who gifted an infant Frankie Fresto with more than his fair share of musical talent when he grabbed for it at his birth. The book follows Frankie through his life as Music and a series of guests at his funeral relate his experiences, which include brushes with a number of musical figures such as Elvis Presley. It was clever the way Albom tied all of this together to create a sort of "Forrest Gump" like tale of an often troubled man's journey through life and across several continents. I most enjoyed the story of the relationship he had with his wife and daughter, though he did not always treat them well. Our book group found it fairly discussable.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book! The book is written from the perspective of Music, which I think adds an interesting take on the story.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books of 2015.
  • (4/5)
    Liked this a lot better than I expected. The author uses Music as a narrator to relate the life of Frankie Presto. He intertwines Frankie's story with the history of contemporary music and musicians.
  • (4/5)
    Every time I think of this book, I give it a higher rating. The theme of this book was so unusual that I couldn't imagine why i should read it other than that Mitch's other books were always fine. I was pleasantly surprised to read 1/2 of it in my first sitting. It's very very good and I've already recommended it to others..
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful. Told from a very different perspective.
  • (5/5)
    Simply magical. I love everything about this book, especially the talented voice talents that gave life to this wonderful story.
  • (5/5)
    beautiful. could not stop listening. Thank again Mitch Albom, for Wonderful story
  • (5/5)
    I read it and then listened to it. Loved it both times.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely beautiful book. Thanks to the author who took me on an amazing journey.
  • (5/5)
    Such a great story that takes you through the ups and downs of a guitarist and his adventures.
  • (5/5)
    I couldnt stop devouring the words of this book until the end. Such a masterpiece. I hope you publish another book. Thank you Mitch Albom for this book ?
  • (5/5)
    Before I begin, I have to say, just ignore the asinine reviewer who sees opposing political ideas in everything. This is neither conservative nor liberal in the political sense. Now, for my opinions...In the magic strings of Frankie Presto, Mitch Albom presents a sweeping yet focused story of one life and how it affected so many others. Equally important is the number of lives that affected his life, though that realization comes late in the book.I am hesitant to discuss too many details both because I don't want to accidentally give any spoilers and because discovering those details in the course of reading is what makes this such a delicious book. It is a unique story in that the narrator is Music, as in one of the arts and not actually a person. This allows some wonderful insights when Music observes human action and separates what music is and what humans sometimes believe music to be.While this is a wonderful story about a musician's life and the role Music played, and deserves 5 stars on that basis alone, it is when the reader re-thinks the story and sees Music as a metaphor for life that the story really becomes a story not just about Frankie's life but about the reader's life as well. We may not all reach the highs or the lows of Frankie Presto but each of us must traverse our own highs and lows, and this novel allows us to understand many of those moments from a different perspective. While a symphony is used within the story as just such a metaphor I think Music with its many threads weaving life and lives together that makes a better metaphor.I highly recommend this book for just about anyone who enjoys a story that has a touch of the supernatural while also maintaining a strong connection to reality. While I am not sure I would truly call it magical realism, I do believe an argument could be made for it.Like I tell friends when I really like something but know they don't want to hear my long drawn out comments: "it made me laugh, it made me cry."Reviewed from a copy made available through Goodreads First Reads.
  • (5/5)
    I won this from Goodreads first reads, and was thrilled.I enjoy music as much as the next guy, well rock music and oldies at least. I do prefer to use my ear pods for listening to books over listening to music, though. I can't read music and don't play any instruments. Could not tell you the difference between allegro and adagio. In other words, I'm not exactly what you'd call musical. Thus when it hit me that Music is the narrator of this book, I was a little worried. Then I immediately thought of Death as the narrator in The Book Thief, which I loved, so I thought "Keep an open mind. This could be very special."Or a little magical, as it turned out. Just a smidge; just enough.While Music tells us about Frankie becoming orphaned as a baby during the Spanish Civil War and his musical training as a boy, other chapters are told by famous people who knew Frankie, Burt Bacharach and Tony Bennett to name two, those who learned of Frankie's death and are eulogizing him. We learn how he was as talented or moreso than Elvis during the time of Elvis, we learn of his diverse singing and amazing abilities with those guitar strings, a unique talent who had it all--voice, talent, and looks--up to getting high at Woodstock. I loved the continuous name dropping of musicians met along the way of Frankie's search for his childhood sweetheart, to all the music meccas of the U.S.: Detroit, Nashville, New Orleans, and of course Woodstock. All while the lyrics of well-known love songs sing out Frankie's feelings for his beloved Aurora. It started feeling very much like Forrest Gump after a while--the time period, Frankie's loneliness and perseverence, just a tad magical, very musical--and I can picture this being turned into that same type of movie. I felt this even before I noticed my book jacket mentions Gump as well. Well, in the end this was very, very special. Music is just one of many talents we are infused with, some people more than others. We all know that Music, though, can absorb your memories, with a single tune taking you back years to where you were and what you were doing the first time you heard it. Music can and has changed the world. It is alive in us from birth, and when we die Music takes it back, to pass on to his next disciple. Really a beautiful thing from this very talented author, who inevitably tugs at the strings of my heart. 4.5 stars.
  • (2/5)
    I say skip the book and go straight for the music. I just couldn't buy in to the idea of Music as storyteller or narrator, reliable or unreliable. Some of the chapters, especially of Frankie's early life in Spain were interesting but the musical terms used for comparisons and life-saving strings became almost hokey for me and easily anticipated. The musical history of various legends is easily appreciated by music lovers as well. Maybe I just have too many bad memories of childhood piano lessons to appreciate the Testare De Corde (testing the strings) Albom is shooting for with this Novel. Follow the playlist and you have some great music to listen to.Provided by publisher
  • (5/5)
    I'm treading carefully with my review here, because I don't want to give even the hint of a spoiler. And this is such a unique book, that there are spoilers at every turn. So I'll start with this: I absolutely loved this book!Clearly, it's not a spoiler to say that there is a strong connection between the characters, the plot, and music. The overall story has a kind of mystical feel, which perfectly fits the content. After all, music itself is mystical in its ability to transform or enhance our moods. Music brings us together as a group, while at the same time remaining a uniquely personal experience. This is also how the book feels; a shared experience that will touch each of us in a personal way. Mitch Albom is a natural storyteller. His writing style is something you experience, rather than read. His words drew me in, took me to unexpected places, brought me to tears, and made me giggle. I rarely read books over again (there are simply too many on my wishlist!), but this is one I will return to in the future.
  • (5/5)
    "Truth is Light. Lies are shadows. Music is both." Is this statement from a non-fiction book by Mitch Albom? No, it is from his novel. What a beautiful novel narrated by music. Music tells the story of Fransisco, better known as Frankie who was blessed with the gift of music and which he earned by practising devoutly at the feet of his maestro; his maestro who tells him, "The secret is not to make your music louder, but to make the world quieter."One could quote the entire book but I'll leave you with one thought; a thought that will make you want to read the book in which Frankie, like Forrest Gump stumbles to real life musicians and plays with them - "Man searches his courage in drink, but it is not courage he finds, it is fear that he loses."Nobody who reads this love story will remain the same after it.
  • (5/5)
    In a book narrated by music, Frankie Presto’s amazing life is examined. An orphan, baby Frankie was found in a river by an unmarried man he came to believe was his father. Frankie was blessed with musical ability and this ability led him and his guitar from Franco’s Spain to the US where he worked with musicians like Duke Ellington, Elvis and other pop stars. Like all Mitch Albom books you feel better about the world after you’ve read the book.
  • (5/5)
    “The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto” is the story of a young boy taken in and raised by a blind music teacher after he is orphaned in the Spanish American War. When he is nine, Frankie, with his battered guitar and six magical strings, is smuggled out of Spain on a tramp freighter. In London, he meets legendary guitarist Django Reinhardt who is on his way to America to play with Duke Ellington. Frankie travels with Django and soon the boy’s talent earns him international acclaim.Seduced by the glitterati, he becomes a pop star, ignoring the guitar and the talent that first brought him fame. Through the years, he meets some of the greatest musical talents of the twentieth century including Hank Williams, Elvis Presley, Wynton Marsalis, Carole King, Burt Bacharach, and Tony Bennett. Each reminisces as another bit of Frankie’s life story is shared. At the height of his popularity, Frankie vanishes and a legend grows around him. He has realized that his musical gift is also his burden for his music holds the power to change lives and, as the Spirit of Music narrates the tale, the lives set right are revealed as one by one the magical strings turns blue.An eloquent and touching tale, this intricately-woven tapestry of fact, fantasy, and fiction, will keep readers mesmerized. This is one book readers will find hard to put down and even harder to forget.Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    I’ve enjoyed other Mitch Albom books in the past, but this one wasn’t on my short list until two coworkers recommended it. One coworker highly recommended the audiobook version and I’m so glad that I followed her advice. The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto is one of the best audiobooks I’ve ever heard. It’s read by a full cast of talented actors including Mitch Albom himself.

    Here's a basic summary of the book:

    This is the epic story of Frankie Presto—the greatest guitar player who ever lived—and the six lives he changed with his six magical blue strings.

    It’s easy to get lost into this story and forget everything that’s happening around you. This story offers more than a fictitious character’s musical career. It’s the ups and downs in his life and his relationships that add depth to the story. Frankie Presto’s fame was believable — I wanted him to be a real person.

    I love it when authors use a unique narrator and find different ways to format their story. In this case, music was the narrator and it began with Frankie’s death. This one start at the end, then jump to the beginning circling back around to the end.

    I’ve always loved music and I played an instrument for eight years, so I can read music and understand the terminology. I enjoyed his musical journey and how his life intertwined with famous musicians. I didn't know all of the music references, but it was fun when he mentioned artists that I know such as Little Richard, Lyle Lovett, Duke Ellington, Hank Williams, Elvis Presley, and Paul Stanley. Frankie’s music career made me wish I still played an instrument and had his talent.

    If you’re thinking about reading this book, I highly recommend the audiobook version. Get ready for a magical journey.

  • (2/5)
    The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, Mitch AlbomI won this book from Goodreads and was looking forward to reading it. I try to like most of the books I read and truly made an effort with this one. Since I also obtained an audio version which seemed exceptionally interesting because of the awesome array of well-known narrators, some who were performers, I decided to listen to it first. After finally getting through the audio, I could not bear to plow through the written version. I have enjoyed several of Mitch Albom’s books in the past, but this one was not one of them. I kept wondering where the tale was leading. Where and what was the inspirational message? The book begins with the birth of Frankie Presto and marches on until his legendary death. The story is about what seems to have been a child prodigy, from all accounts of his musical ability. He grew into a phenomenal musician whose amazing talent and special gift was that he inspired others to play and improve their own skills. His unusual and valuable guitar had magic strings that turn blue. As the book progresses, the mystery of the blue strings is solved. When the book begins the narrator is identified as Music. Music has come to claim what is due, to take the gift of music from the deceased who no longer needs it so it can be passed on to another who does, another who lives. The gift is passed on to Francesco Presto when he is born. Music continues to narrate the story, joined by the voices of the non-fiction characters that have come to eulogize Frankie Presto upon hearing of his death. They speak of him as if he has truly had an influence on their lives and their world of music.Francisco Presto was born in Spain, in 1936, during the Civil War. At his birth, his mother, Carmencita, sings him a song about tears, and his tears soon begin to drive the novice nun who rescued him for his mother, and her neighbors, to distraction. Although she feels forced to abandon him, in order to survive, she watches over him from afar, for the rest of his life. This child will survive and grow up with an amazing ability to sing, dance and play his guitar. So, to summarize, he was born in a church that was being attacked during a war, then he was rescued by a nun and subsequently thrown into the water by the same nun, Josepha, abandoned and left to die, but then he was saved by a hairless dog and raised by a stranger, Baffa Rubio, who worked in a sardine factory. He was then taught by a blind musician, El Maestro, who drugs him and sends him off to America at the behest of his quasi father, Baffa, now in prison. El Maestro, the blind musician is then robbed and murdered by Alberto, after putting Frankie, drugged, on board a ship. For his whole life, Frankie had one true friend and lover named Aurora. As children, they met in a tree, and she reappears from time to time at significant times of his life. The live together and Aurora becomes pregnant. While Frankie is off on an ill-begotten binge, Aurora is mugged and loses their baby. She disappears, once again. Frankie has an unhappy marriage, his career declines. Aurora reappears at a low point in his life and they marry and eventually raise an abandoned child named Kai. She also becomes an accomplished guitarist. The author covered the entire entertainment industry by including the names of many well known composers, movie producers and performers throughout the book. Mentioned were Bach, Andreas Segovia, the Beattles, Wynton Marsalis, Arrowsmith, Janis Joplin, Fats Domino, Duke Ellington, Burt Bacharach, the Everly Brothers, the Drifters, Beethoven, Francisco Tarraga, The Who, Chet Atkins, The Rolling Stones, Tony Bennett, Elvis Presley and so many more that I could go on and on, but perhaps that is where the fault in the book lies. It simply tried too hard to cover too many basses. Drug addiction, Hurricane Katrina, Woodstock and then the Viet Nam War was even entered into the narrative as Frankie became an entertainer of the troops! I found the love story of Frankie and Aurora lacking in credibility. Yes, Aurora, the love of his life was a saint who seemed to always magically appear when needed, and yes, the nun, Josepha was his guardian angel, but then what? What was the ultimate message of this book? Do we live until we do all the things our heart tells us to do? Is it the good we do that determines how much time we have on earth? With the last magic string was his life no longer deemed useful? Was music Frankie’s mistress or master? Was he Moses rescued from the water and assigned the thankless task of saving others? The reason why the strings turned blue left me completely unmoved.I wondered, also, if it was the author’s intention to include and promote every liberal piece of philosophy he could think of, in his book. One got the sense that Frankie preached against war, smoking, drugs, alcohol, guns, violence and a host of other things, while he abused most of these things in his own life, at one time or another. I also wondered if the reference to music, as in “I Am Music,” by the character in the book that represented “music”, was meant to bring Barry Manilow to mind. He was the man who composed the song with the lyrics, “I am Music and I write the songs”.I found the repetitive sayings annoying rather than thought provoking. Frankie in a love sick way kept repeating “Aurora, that means dawning”, (until it doesn’t), and also “will you stay”, to which she replies yes and no alternatively, until she finally does and so does he; she asks him the same question a number of times. Music keeps saying “I am music” and “everyone in life joins a band, ad nauseum, to refer to the different groups that form and reform engaging Frankie throughout his life. The audiobook is read well by the author, Mitch Albom, and famous guitarists and singers: Paul Stanley of Kiss, John Pizzarelli who also played guitar for Paul McCartney, George Guidall an actor and narrator of audio books, Mike Hodge of the Screen Actor’s Guild, Robin Miles, an actress, director, and audiobook narrator, Christian Baskous, an actor and audiobook narrator, Tony Chiroldes, a bilingual actor and voice-over performer, Kevin O’neill, a writer, director, and music video producer, and Adriana Sananes, a linguist who once studied dancing is a narrator and an actress. Albom himself is a songwriter, musician, journalist and author. He wears many hats and is very talented. In this book, he allowed the participants in the narrative to imagine their own memories of Frankie Presto as if he was a real performer who had a real life-changing effect on them and their worlds. For me, the story was simply too hokey and too contrived, not like his other books which transcended the fantasy world of this book and which were more of his own ideas. This story soon became overly sentimental and simplistic, like a child’s fairy tale.
  • (5/5)
    Narrated by The Spirit of Music, this is the tale of the world's greatest guitarist--who disappears at the height of his career. The tale is told in a series of recollections of major performers and others in the music industry, some fictional, some real. Mitch Alborn received a lot of permissions(and must have called in a few favors) to accomplish this. The result is indeed magic.