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IndisponívelThe Elite (Selection, Book 2)
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The Elite (Selection, Book 2)

Escrito por Kiera Cass

Narrado por Amy Rubinate

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Indisponível em seu país

The Elite (Selection, Book 2)

Escrito por Kiera Cass

Narrado por Amy Rubinate

notas:
3.5/5 (122 notas)
Duração:
7 horas
Lançados:
5 de jun. de 2014
ISBN:
9780007587711
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

The Selection gets fierce as rivals stake their claim on the prince.
Six girls, one life-changing prize…

America Singer will leave her pre-destined life for a world of glamour and luxury, if she wins…

But surviving The Selection is tough. Rivals are battling to become Prince Maxon’s bride as the threat of rebel violence just beyond the palace walls escalates into war.

Only six girls are left and sworn friendships are tested to breaking point. America’s feelings for Maxon grow stronger, but she suspects darker mysteries in his royal past. With ex-lover Aspen waiting for her in the shadows, where do her loyalties truly lie?

Lançados:
5 de jun. de 2014
ISBN:
9780007587711
Formato:
Audiolivro

Sobre o autor

Kiera Cass graduated from Radford University with a degree in History. She grew up in South Carolina and currently lives in Blacksburg, Virginia with her family. In her spare time, Kiera enjoys reading, dancing, making videos and eating unhealthy amounts of cake. You can learn more about Kiera at kieracass.com, follow her on twitter via @kieracass, and see her silly videos at YouTube.com/user/kieracass.


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122 notas / 103 Análises
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Avaliações do leitor

  • (4/5)
    American continues the push and pull between her love from home (who magically ends up a guard at the palace!) and her attraction to Maxon. She finds herself a bit of a rallying point for those who want to see the caste system ended because America sticks up for the right, not tradition. Alongside these attempts to create a more serious storyline is the whole "Bachelor" vibe, which feels like manufactured drama.
  • (2/5)
    I think I would like this book better if it wasn't so damn predictable. Since it's #2 in a series, you know the love triangle won't be wrapped up, so I wasn't particularly irritated by that. But, please, for the love of everything, put less cliche obstacles in the main character's way. If I have to read one more scene where America throws a temper tantrum instead of just talking to Maxon about his feelings I will love my everloving mind. Also, of course you have to introduce some kind of shadowy conspiracy and an abusive father because why make anything surprising? Oh, and don't forget to have your main character run to a liaison with a guard literally right after she just saw her friend get caned for doing the exact. same. thing. I mean, I liked the first one enough to try out the third in this series...but please someone tell me it gets better. Please?
  • (4/5)
    I think I should have waited until the final book was released before I started reading this trilogy. Now I want to know what is going to happen to Maxon and America but I have to wait until 2014! That's not fair.

    This is a fun trilogy. It's part Bachelor and part Hunger Games without people killing each other. Not sure the time frame but it is some time in the future. They seem to have current technology and also ancient items. So it's a mixture of two worlds. The writing is good, it sucks you into the characters and what is going on with them. It's a good young adult series. If you like young adult series like this it is very enjoyable and I recommend the trilogy.
  • (4/5)
    Like this one so much more than book 1...Moving on to book three!
  • (4/5)
    While I still love America and Maxon I think America is starting to get on my nerves. Not as a character but as a person. She is so quick to berate others for their mistakes all the while doing whatever the heck she wants. I enjoyed seeing the growth between her and Maxon and seeing the other between her and Aspen.

    I wanted to read this awhile back but this was the first time I saw them at the library. Good book, decent pacing, although the ending was a little iffy.
  • (4/5)
    Apr 2018 = 4 stars
    Jun 2014 = 4.5 stars
  • (4/5)
    UGHHHHH why do these books have to end? I can't wait to start the next book. I love where the characters are going and developing. The plot twists and all the action keeps me reading far too long. I need sleep! Definitely recommend this book.
  • (3/5)
    I thought it was kind of slow at the beginning, but liked how it ended.
  • (3/5)
    Quite a bit better than the first one. It keeps the fun quasi-dystopian fairytale setting but raises the stakes considerably -- people are injured, there's the actual threat of death. I don't know why it took America this long to realize that she lives in, you know, A DYSTOPIA, but now that she's aware she can't say or do what she wants, she's become an even more fun protagonist.

    Interested to see how it all works out.

    This is much more of a romance than a dystopia (or even a fantasy). It takes place in a future setting, but without any science fictiony stuff whatsoever. Like, they use computers and cell phones and go to movie theatres. Probably a good pick for a teen girl who preferred the romancey aspects of The Hunger Games to the political message... though there is some political allegory in here as well.
  • (4/5)
    More like 3 1/2 stars, really. The 1st book was better; this was slightly long (the 2nd book in a trilogy is often that way, IMHO) but it was pretty good. ...and I can't wait to find out how it'll end :)
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book just as much as I enjoyed the first book. The Elite is the continuation of the final 6 potential new princess for Prince Maxon. You have Marlee, America, Celeste, Natalie, Kriss, and Elise who have made it this far. America is torn between the Prince and her ex Aspen. She doesn't know if she still love Aspen or Prince Maxon. I have been torn about who she should be with. I am pulling for her to win and be Maxon's Princess. I can feel the connection they have with each other when Maxon and America are together. I also see how much Aspen loves America.There is a Halloween party. And the guards, The Royal Family and the Elite all enjoy themselves. After the party one of the girls goes because of something she did. This rocks America and how she feels about Maxon. The next assignment they have to do is throw a reception for the Germans and Italians that will be visiting. They are split into teams, 3 on one and 2 on the other. America works with Kriss on the party for the Italians. All the girls do a fantastic job.One more assignment is having to create a project that will help the country. Mer does something stupid and learns a lot after wards about Maxon. Now the competition is heating up again since America is not going home after her stunt on the Report. I am going to be reading the next book.
  • (4/5)
    Great continuance of the series, which builds directly off from the book before. It's hard for me to describe these books, except to say that they are basically dystopian chick lit, along with a generous mix of just pure fashion. Somehow, it works rather well.
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyable quick read. I felt like something was missing as far as Aspen was concerned and I felt that America could be quite stubborn and selfish when it wasn't called for. I'm very interested in seeing how it continues and, hopefully, learn even more about the war namely the endgame for the rebels.
  • (4/5)
    I very much enjoyed the additional character development we get in this book. Most characters are revealed to be significantly more complex than they have been in previous books. However, despite me not liking him, it was kinda annoying to see how much Aspen is turning out like Gale in the latter Hunger Games novels - being driven more by a need to revenge himself upon "the man" than by any real care or interest for those around him. Prince Maxon's development was rather impressive and a bit unexpected - he isn't as simple as he would appear.
  • (5/5)
    This book is amazing and beautiful. I’m gonna binge all the book right away.
  • (3/5)
    One quick fact check; America told Marlee that because the violin she had belonged to the royal family and not to America herself, Marlee could hit Celeste over the head with it (or something like that,) but in the first book it was mentioned that the instruments at the palace were much better than the ones that America herself owned, so in the highly unlikely event that she wasn't already attached to it, America wouldn't have wanted to hurt the violin because of its beauty and quality. Something related that I didn't mention in my review of The Selection, is that, given the price of musical instruments, plus new strings and bow rehairs from time to time, and the fact that they do have to be checked for (and sometimes repaired because of) open seams, cracks and shifted soundposts. Not to mention the amount of practice you have to put toward music, and the fact that you really do have to change teachers from time to time, it doesn't make a lot of sense to have such a poor caste be the musicians. I'm guessing that the author didn't bother to look up the price of a decent violin before considering her characters occupation and caste.
    Do I even need to talk about how annoying America was in this book? Her stupidity at the end had me face-palming. I completely understand her fury at Maxon, but did she really think that doing what she did would help in any way? Maxon said at the end that even though he loved her, he didn't trust, but he was kissing Celeste, effectively cheating on both America and Kris. It would make sense if America questioned whether she could trust him. And speaking of cheating, America's affections toward Aspen really bother me. I think that I established in my review of the first book that I don't like Aspen. He's too controlling. I can't even imagine what his response to America staying will be, but I doubt that it'll be gracious. After what happened to Marlee, I would have thought that Aspen and America would've put their relationship on hold--something they should have already done--if for no other reason then to try and protect each other. What's more is that, in order to regain Maxon's trust, one thing that America will have to do is admit that her ex-boyfriend is living in the palace, and I know she won't want to do that.
    I did like the revelation of Maxon's secret. I feel bad for him, and it certainly gave his character more depth.
    I did enjoy this book, but it would have been more enjoyable if the three main characters had stopped being so darn stupid. And I really hope that there will be an actual meeting between the three main characters (or at least America) and the rebels. Even though I like the general idea of selection plot, the fact that we've only had I've very brief glimpse of people who are actually part of one of the rebel groups is leaving quite a bit to be desired with conflict and action.
  • (3/5)
    This review is full of spoilers.
    This review is posted on my blog

    I didn't like this book as much as I liked the first one and I think that that was mostly due to the Aspen story line. It just did not appeal to me at all. It was predictable from the first chapter of the first book that this kid was going to show up and mess things up, and honestly I'm a little tired of this dramatic secret love triangle story line where the leading lady tries to explain away why she is messing around with two or more men. To be honest, I didn't even find Aspen that likable. So because that was a major story line in this book, it just didn't seem as good.

    I loved Marlee and even though I had already guessed what was coming, I was so sad for her when she got caught with Carter. I thought it was a very moving scene when America was fighting to get her, although I'm not sure what she thought she was going to do.

    I liked that the political aspect took more of a forefront than the previous book, and thought it was very interesting reading about Gregory Illéa, and the situation in present day Illéa. When her father seemed really interested in the diary, and I found the whole rebels with books scene very suspicious.

    I think that in this book Maxon's character started to seem all over the place. I've said that I didn't like America was messing around with Aspen while we were lead to believe how much she cared about Maxon, and I found it equally irritating when Maxon put on a show of complete devotion to America while being secretive about the other girls. I thought that this whole mess was made even worse by the touching revelation in the closet about how Maxon is beat by his father. Don't get me wrong, I thought it was a nice scene, but it just seemed like a plot twist to me.

    I could have ignored a lot of those things if it wasn't for the terribly arrogant scene where Maxon humiliates America in front of Kriss, and then leaves with her, just, it seams, to get back at her.

    If you liked the first book, I would recommend reading this one, if only to get to the last book in the series.
  • (4/5)
    America, Maxon AND Aspen get on my damn nerves
    But I read this in one sitting and I gotta say, I really enjoyed it
  • (2/5)
    wow interesting i love this book so much may be when i have enough money i will buy it online
  • (4/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    Finished this in just a couple of hours on an airplane-- it goes incredibly fast. This one went really fast and was engaging, but on reflection it seems very much a Hunger Games ripoff, just the central contest is a glorified season of The Bachelor instead of a gladiator-esque fight to death. Fun, but not profound.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (4/5)
    Just finished this one this morning. And I immediately starting reading The One (next in the series). Once again there were plenty of times in this book that I wanted to smack America back to her senses. And I was constantly on the edge of my seat worried that she would do something stupid or get caught.

    I can't decide if I can't put this series down because I love it so much or because I am so worried about what will happen. I want to find out if America screws up everything and breaks both men's hearts. But really, I guess, what is the difference. Either way, I'm reading the books and worried about the characters and having a really hard time putting the books down. I even got ready this morning with the kindle on my counter, reading while brushing my teeth, drying my hair, getting dressed...

    In fact, I'm already on page 104 of The One. I'm sure I will finish it tonight, or early tomorrow morning. ;)
  • (3/5)
    One quick fact check; America told Marlee that because the violin she had belonged to the royal family and not to America herself, Marlee could hit Celeste over the head with it (or something like that,) but in the first book it was mentioned that the instruments at the palace were much better than the ones that America herself owned, so in the highly unlikely event that she wasn't already attached to it, America wouldn't have wanted to hurt the violin because of its beauty and quality. Something related that I didn't mention in my review of The Selection, is that, given the price of musical instruments, plus new strings and bow rehairs from time to time, and the fact that they do have to be checked for (and sometimes repaired because of) open seams, cracks and shifted soundposts. Not to mention the amount of practice you have to put toward music, and the fact that you really do have to change teachers from time to time, it doesn't make a lot of sense to have such a poor caste be the musicians. I'm guessing that the author didn't bother to look up the price of a decent violin before considering her characters occupation and caste.
    Do I even need to talk about how annoying America was in this book? Her stupidity at the end had me face-palming. I completely understand her fury at Maxon, but did she really think that doing what she did would help in any way? Maxon said at the end that even though he loved her, he didn't trust, but he was kissing Celeste, effectively cheating on both America and Kris. It would make sense if America questioned whether she could trust him. And speaking of cheating, America's affections toward Aspen really bother me. I think that I established in my review of the first book that I don't like Aspen. He's too controlling. I can't even imagine what his response to America staying will be, but I doubt that it'll be gracious. After what happened to Marlee, I would have thought that Aspen and America would've put their relationship on hold--something they should have already done--if for no other reason then to try and protect each other. What's more is that, in order to regain Maxon's trust, one thing that America will have to do is admit that her ex-boyfriend is living in the palace, and I know she won't want to do that.
    I did like the revelation of Maxon's secret. I feel bad for him, and it certainly gave his character more depth.
    I did enjoy this book, but it would have been more enjoyable if the three main characters had stopped being so darn stupid. And I really hope that there will be an actual meeting between the three main characters (or at least America) and the rebels. Even though I like the general idea of selection plot, the fact that we've only had I've very brief glimpse of people who are actually part of one of the rebel groups is leaving quite a bit to be desired with conflict and action.
  • (4/5)
    Okay, now I'm hooked. In the first book of the Selections series, there was an enjoyable love triangle between America Singer, Aspen, and Prince Maxon. The second book in the series, The Elite, broadens the story so much more to include the political aspects of what is actually happening in the kingdom of Illea. Frequent attacks are happening on the palace by Southern rebels who seem intent upon killing and causing destruction. Attacks by Northern rebels seem to have more of a purpose, as though they are looking for something in the palace with each raid. Also we find that Maxon has been hedging his bets a bit by developing a relationship with some of the other girls for a variety of reasons, all of which we don't learn until near the end of this book. America's confusion and indecision becomes a bit tedious and seems a little cruel at times to both of the men she claims to care about, but by the end of the book, her focus becomes more clear. I'm anxious to read the next book, The One.
  • (4/5)
    I really couldn't put this book down. It's pretty obvious how most of this series will play out but that doesn't make it any less enjoyable. The few things that do keep me guessing are enough to keep me hooked. My main complaint about this book is the complete lack of communication between Maxon and America. She keeps things from him and doesn't ask the questions she really needs the answers to which leads her to make incredibly stupid decisions. There were many points in the book that I just felt like she didn't deserve him anyway, let him pick Kriss. I did like how the book ended and can only hope she has learned her lesson.
  • (3/5)
    Not as good as book 1 with most of it dealing with America being very wishy-washy but I'm still going to keep with the series. I really want to find out more about the rebels and if/how things get changed with the society.

    I'm hoping Maxon is America's final choice.
  • (3/5)
    I think these books are sort of a guilty pleasure, sort of like I'd imagine watching The Bachelor is for some people. Can't entirely vouch for that, since I don't watch The Bachelor. The characters don't seem terribly fleshed out, but I like the world the author has created and her efforts to give them some depth. Spent much of the book trying to remember what happened in the first one and came up short, a frequent problem for series which have not had all of their parts released just yet. Overall, I rank this one above the first, but not in the realms of better dystopic YA series.
  • (3/5)
    I was writing the review in my head as I read it. I was going to write how the book started out with the main character being all sappy with her two boyfriends and wishywashy and whatnot, but then the book got better.

    Except that it didn't. The whole freaking book is 'does he love me?' 'can I love him?' 'is he a good guy or a bad guy?' and her crying over this, that and the other thing. Teenage angst, thy name is The Elite. Seriously, both guys should drop her and go for someone who can make up her freaking mind. Or she should just choose BOTH OF THEM like any REASONABLE PERSON. Well, any reasonable poly person anyhow.

    The competition at the heart of these books isn't advanced much. There's a little bit of political stuff, but not much. She's in actual danger.. not often.

    It's just very blah, unless you /like/ teenage main characters who can't choose between two guys and spend an entire book waffling.

    Nothing is resolved in this book. Absolutely bloody nothing.

    I shouldn't expect much from second books in the YA dystopia genre, I really shouldn't, yet I keep doing it. This one didn't disappoint me half so much as Insurgent (sequel to Divergent), and I will probably pick up the third book. But oh em gee, you guys, I begin to see why some people can't stand to read YA.

    Maybe I am finally getting too old for this genre!!
  • (3/5)
    "From the beginning, I've really only looked at you, wanted you...I've been looking for a suitable alternative, but the truth is, there's only you."

    The Elite continues off right where The Selection began, in which America has made the decision to stay in the competition towards becoming the Princess of Illea, and the bride of the one-day-will-be-King, Maxon. America and Maxon's relationship was rooted in friendship in the first book, and for the first few chapters, it is all rainbows and butterflies for the two.

    But things hit a rough patch when a situation close to America's heart results in unbelievable and unethical consequences. And when she puts the blame on Maxon, it seemingly all starts to fall apart. Maxon seems to have secrets of his own. The competition is not as final as Maxon has made it seem... while he has chosen with his heart, he must also consider other important factors: the public, the King, America's indecisiveness... When the rebels are closer than they all were lead to believe, America sees that there are better, infinitely more suited options left in The Elite for Maxon. And out of anger, she makes a decision that she can't help but regret... Not only for her sake, but for Maxon's as well. And perhaps, all of the kingdom.

    The Elite is not how I expected America's story would unravel. I felt that her character regressed greatly from the strong, loud-spoken girl that she was in The Selection. There were times when I felt that it was impossible for this to be the same girl. It was similar with Maxon, whom I absolutely loved in the first book. While Maxon was proclaiming the solidity of their future and his love for her in the start of the book, his actions that follow speak anything but. I missed the friendship between Maxon and America that lead me to love them in the first book. Aspen came off as annoying and irresponsible, and I could not fathom that this boy loved America as much as he said he did if he was willing to risk her life so often considering the situation.

    Regardless, I am excited to see how this series will end in The One. Illea needs a lot of changes for it to become the kingdom that it has the potential to become, and I think that America and Maxon have a large say in how change will come in regards to the caste system and the poverty. I think that they have a lot of potential to change everything. A lot of questions were left unanswered, and Cass is going to have to bring it up a notch and provide her readers with a mindblowing conclusion.

    "I know there was a time, when our country was new, when the assignment of these numbers helped organize something that was on the brink of not existing. But we are no longer this country. We are so much more now."
  • (3/5)
    Gobbled this one up, too. Not as good as the first one. Interested to see who she picks but we have awhile to wait. Complete mind-candy.
  • (3/5)
    I haven't read the first in this series, so this is a proper test for The Elite. Can it stand out as a good book in its own right?

    The answer? No. This is a 2.75 rounded up to 3.

    Warning: this review is a little angry, I didn't enjoy this book as much as that overly-fussy yet still pretty cover made me think I would. Boo for pretty covers and my judging a book by its cover. But it's still got (almost) 3 stars, so it's not all that bad.

    It's a decent enough story, if not terribly confusing, as it apparently picks up exactly where the last one ended. I often pick up a book and read it without checking to see if it's part of a series - and usually that's perfectly fine, it's great, it makes me want to read all of the other books. In a series there is usually a run-down of what happened in the previous book(s) if not only to remind you of what happened. Even House of Night managed that (but, you know, nowadays that'll be a book in itself. FINISH IT ALREADY!). It's the mark of a strong series, that it's easily accessible. The Elite just isn't unless you're already invested in the series.

    And then on to the characters. Dear god, America, what kind of girl are you? Do you want him or don't you? She's all "oh I don't want to be with him!" and then he shows the slightest interest in someone else and she's all "back off bitch!" and angry. Not everyone loves you, you spoilt Mary-Sue, who's only redeeming quality seems to be that she was once poor and is a bit of a slag. Maxon is a spoiled brat pretty much until the very end, and Aspen just needs to go away and stop screwing with Mer's head. I liked the queen though, and Marlee.

    The world seems very flat too. For a dystopian novel this isn't good at all, oh no. This story seemed to focus on the mansion and all the pretty things and the lavish lifestyle. There wasn't much of the hardship displayed, only a few raids during which all the characters are tucked away safely. Except for America of course, she's a Mary-Sue so can run faster than anyone, ever.

    Good points? Yes, there are some. The story was sweet in places and I really felt for Marlee. And for Kriss, as it feels like she's being led along. And America's maids, she was quite nasty to them, even when they devoted themselves to her. And by the end I was beginning to piece the obscure world together a little and better understand the motives driving some of the characters. Maxon's not all bad, but he's not all good either, I'm definitely team Maxon. There was tension and conflict between the characters, they weren't all 2D, they had emotions.

    The ending was a bit of a relief for me. It was predictable, yes, but a good predictable. It wrapped up well but kept enough back to set the scene for another book, you know to resolve the whole Selection process. And there was even more tension added, you know, because it's the end.

    If I had read the first I'd probably like this story more, as I'd know what was going on.

    Thanks, NetGalley for a copy of this.