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Howl's Moving Castle

Howl's Moving Castle

Escrito por Diana Wynne Jones

Narrado por Jenny Sterlin


Howl's Moving Castle

Escrito por Diana Wynne Jones

Narrado por Jenny Sterlin

avaliações:
4.5/5 (249 avaliações)
Comprimento:
8 horas
Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2008
ISBN:
9781436186124
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

A Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Book and ALA Notable and Best of the Year in Young Adult Fiction, Howl’s Moving Castle by acclaimed fantasy writer Diana Wynne Jones was transformed into an Academy Award-nominated animated motion picture by Hayao Miyazaki. On a rare venture out from her step-mother’s hat shop, Sophie attracts the attention of a witch, who casts a terrible spell transforming the young girl into an old crone.

Lançado em:
Jan 1, 2008
ISBN:
9781436186124
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

DIANA WYNNE JONES was born in August 1934 in London, where she had a chaotic and unsettled childhood against the background of World War II. The family moved around a lot, finally settling in rural Essex. As children, Diana and her two sisters were deprived of a good, steady supply of books by a father, ‘who could beat Scrooge in a meanness contest’. So, armed with a vivid imagination and an insatiable quest for good books to read, she decided that she would have to write them herself.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Howl's Moving Castle

4.4
249 avaliações / 214 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    Utterly charming. I liked it better than the movie, and I like the movie quite a bit.
  • (4/5)
    I love picturing Miyazaki characters while I read this!
  • (4/5)
    I'm sure I read this ages ago, but it was nice to listen to. Jone's quirky fantasy has her heroine in disguise (under a curse) as an old lady who continues on her adventure despite the fact that it never works out for the eldest child.
  • (4/5)
    When Howl’s Moving Castle pops up in conversation, most people think of the Studio Ghibli film. Surprisingly, it was a beloved fantasy book written by Diana Wynne Jones decades before Hayao Miyazaki adapted it to the screen. It’s also one of the few instances where I can honestly say that the book and the film, while vastly different, are both equally enjoyable.

    Sophie Hatter, the eldest of three sisters, lives in Ingary, where it has been established that the oldest child in every family is the most prone to a dull and ordinary life. While Sophie’s sisters, Lettie and Martha, run off to begin internships in magic and baking, she resigns herself to helping her stepmother manage the family hat shop. Due to an unfortunate misunderstanding, Sophie’s life takes an unusual turn when the Witch of the Waste sets a curse on her. The curse starts Sophie on her own journey, which eventually leads her to the infamous wizard Howl and his moving castle.

    Jones possesses the uncanny ability to write realistic characters within a highly fantastical setting. Sophie may be physically cursed, but her deepest struggles have always been low self-confidence and the misguided attitude that she has no control over her own destiny. Howl is a powerful wizard, but he is also vain, pretentious, and a bit of a coward. Howl’s fire demon, Calcifer, has no corporeal form, yet articulates some of the most human insights of all of the characters. By the end of the novel, each character learns something about themselves, and since the reader can relate to their faults and quirks, he or she gains understanding too.

    Even if you’ve seen the film, the plot is different enough that that there are bound to be moments where you’re genuinely surprised by something. There are multiple twists scattered throughout the novel that add quite a lot of entertainment value. Jones certainly keeps her readers on their toes. Sophie’s sisters, Lettie and Martha, also play significant roles in the book with their own subplots and romances. Howl’s apprentice, Michael (Markl in the film), Prince Justin, and the king’s wizard, Suliman, have larger roles as well, and they are crucial to the events that transpire at the end of the book.

    As an added bonus, especially for literary aficionados, keep an eye out for the abundance of allusions interspersed in dialogue, setting, and character names. Hint: Many are Shakespearean and Arthurian in nature.

    Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones is first and foremost a coming of age story that just so happens to be set in a magical kingdom. As characters, Sophie and Howl are intriguing both together and apart, since they are so different, yet complement each other beautifully. If you love the movie, you will adore the book, and vice versa. Make a weekend of it and devour one after the other. Calcifer would certainly approve.
  • (4/5)
    Charming book! I've been trying to write a concise review for an hour and I still come up short. Let me just say that it's refreshing to see a book where the protagonist is discovering the world as we are, but is not becoming The Chosen One in the process. The mysteries of this world are explored but never fully explained, which has the distinct charm of giving the reader a sense of just how many things are there.
  • (5/5)
    In the fairy-tale land of Ingary, Sophie Hatter is the eldest of three sisters, and thus doomed (so she feels) to fail the worst if they set out to seek their fortunes; so she decides, instead, to be responsible for looking after her sisters. Unfortunately, she falls under a curse cast by the Witch of the Waste, so she leaves home to find a cure. She meets Howl's moving castle (which is also trying to avoid meeting the Witch) as she is crossing the moors, and stays on to look after the housekeeping, in return for the chance to have the spell removed. This is a fun YA read, with lots of unexpected twists and turns to the tale, and mixed up characters who have been cursed by the Witch. And Sophie finds that her sisters, whom she tries to protect from the wizard Howl, are not the only ones who need saving...
  • (4/5)
    I have loved the movie from the first time I saw it. This book did not disappoint! It's so much more than the movie and I loved it!
  • (5/5)
    The book is more comedic, less romantic, yet as delightful as the Miyazaki movie.
  • (4/5)
    I never read anything by Diana Wynne Jones when I was a kid, but I knew about her, somehow. When I decided a few months ago to indulge in gentle, low-stress books - and that means a lot of children's favorites - I knew that Howl's Moving Castle would need to be on the list. I didn't really know much about the plot except that Sophie is under a spell that makes her old, only it's her own doing, and Howl is ridiculous, and also there is a castle that floats around. But I know it's very popular, and that Diana Wynne Jones is well respected.Frankly, I love the book, too. There's a few parts that don't work for me, but I love fairy tale land settings, and protagonists who are dislikable but still lovable, and POV characters who are flat-out wrong about their POV.The bits that didn't work - I'm not sure I'm a fan of reverse portal fantasy element of Wales, though I do like stories where our POV is the portal-land (Sophie, not Howl). I just don't really see why Wales or what it adds to the story, which works perfectly nicely if Howl's home were another part of Ingary, or Norland, or wherever. I also wasn't very clear on the resolution of the plot. I can't point out which part lost me, or what's confusing, only that I feel there's something unsettled or unexplained still, and which I need to have explained to me. Or maybe I am disgruntled with how it seems everyone knew Old!Sophie was Young!Sophie since the very beginning, and it was all disguised so well through Sophie's pov.But, oh, I love that Sophie embraces her old ladyness so thoroughly, grumpy and muttering and the way she goes about things impulsively, instead of logically. She's exasperating, but really so. Howl is also exasperating, never explaining anything, never pinned down - he's certaintly a slitherer-outer - but I like him a lot, too. It's fun having a male main character who is so vain and selfish, but also kind and considerate underneath. I would have been delighted if the end scenario was a friendship between the two, rather than the romance, but a romance is fine - I think I might be interested in non-porny fanfiction exploration of what their lives end up doing. (I'm told by LibraryThing that there are two sequels, but they're not exactly sequels about Howl and Sophie.)I'm very fond of Sophie's sisters, too, and I'm sad that her stepmother got so besmirched by the teenagers. Michael is a bit of not much, I think, but I'd love to have my mind changed about his interestingness.One fun thing is that since Howl's Moving Castle was written in 1985, it is completely uninfluenced by Harry Potter. I've noticed that books-with-magic are a lot more varied in what magic spells are like and what it can do in the before-HP days. Or maybe it's just the books I pick up.
  • (4/5)
    The movie made me want to read the book. However, either I don't remember the movie or the book is different enough that I can't link them in my mind. Doesn't really matter. I enjoyed the book. I think Calcifer was my favorite character.
  • (4/5)
    Wish I hadn't seen the movie first!
  • (5/5)
    I am going to be honest I saw the anime first and noticed that it was based on a book and that's how I decided to read the book. Although I can honestly say the book is much better than the movie. The movie tones down Howl and Sophie's unfavorable personality traits and makes the film much more lighthearted than the book.

    The book starts out with some introductory to Ingary, the Hatter family, and the rumors about Howl and the Witch of the Waste. Sophie has what I like to refer to as First Child Syndrome. She basically functions as a third parent for her two younger sisters and is terrified of failing because she has been told that if she were to set out and seek her fortune she will not succeed. The book references a lot of fairy tale tropes only to turn them on their head.

    Through a series of events Sophie gets turned into an old woman by the Witch of the Waste. Deciding that it really can't get any worse Sophie sets out to seek her fortune and adventure. She ends up finding the moving castle of the "evil" Wizard Howl and there she meets his fire demon Calcifer and strikes a deal with him. If she can free him from the contract he has made with Howl he will return her to normal. Sophie then inserts herself into the lives of the occupants of the moving castle has "Grandma Sophie" the cleaning lady. She befriends Michael (Markl in the movie) Howl's teenage assistant and student who is responsible for the majority of the work "Wizard Howl" does and she has an odd love-hate relationship with the Wizard Howl himself. Throughout the book Sophie learns that the "castle" is actually in three places at once and it's all to help Howl avoid the Witch of the Waste and her curse she put on him because "hell hath no fury like a woman scorned".

    So now Sophie has a deadline, free Calcifer and Howl from their contract before the Witch of the Waste's curse takes effect and she also has to deal with her sister's Martha and Lettie who have switched places and are both being called Lettie for the time being and one sister is in love with Michael and Howl is trying to capture the heart of the other, but that Lettie is in love with a man who keeps turning into different dogs and can't seem to stay human. And then there's the fact Sophie learns she herself has magic and is a powerful witch. What's poor Sophie going to do?
  • (5/5)
    I've read this book over and over again. I think that it can stand alone separate from its movie as they are very different. Diana Wynne Jones crafts easy to read yet complex stories that are never how you expect them to be.
  • (4/5)
    Now that was fun and lovely. I really wouldn't mind more of it though. The ending was a bit rushed wasn't it? I did like the meandering way it got there though. I love seeing everyday life in fantasy novels, so luckily there was plenty of that.
  • (4/5)
    Pleasant and strange. It annoys me how laissez faire Sophie is about everything. Nothing strikes her as odd. Her reaction to everything is "Ok, this is how it is now..." It was a fun story, but following Sophie as the main character weakened the story, in my opinion.
  • (5/5)
    A delightful and cosy tale of a smart but subdued girl in a fairy tale world who, as the oldest of three, has resigned herself that nothing special will ever happen to her (that is the prerogative of the youngest sibling in fairy tales). Then, without explanation, an evil witch curses her, and her life changes forever. Silly without being overly ridiculous, heartwarming without being sappy, and suspenseful without being particularly scary or violent. Fun fantasy for all ages.
  • (4/5)
    This was a very cute, entertaining book. I enjoyed it a lot, even though I don't often read childen's/YA titles. I'm glad I finally got around to this one.
  • (4/5)
    A fun fantasy, my ten year old listener and I both enjoyed. Sophie is the eldest of three daughters, so she knows that in classic fairytale fashion, she cannot expect much in life, but her bravery and intelligence lead to adventure and success. I liked the fact that all "heros" in this story were flawed in some way, but still able to act heroically, and that Sophie spent much of the book as an elderly woman, subtly undermining stereotypes of the elderly. Many myths about romantic love and attraction are lightly debunked also.
  • (5/5)
    Sophie is the eldest of three girls and her father wasn't even a poor woodcutter, so she's always known she would never have adventures - her step-mother isn't even evil. When her father dies just as she's about to leave school, she takes on her responsibilites in the family buisness (a hat shop) with a resigned heart. However, when the Witch of the Waste comes by the shop and casts a spell that ages her, Sophie decides that it's time she set out to find her fortune. Maybe the Wizard Howl (who is rumoured to eat the hearts of young girls) will be able to help - if the Witch of the Waste doesn't get him first...A firm favourite - challenges all those fairy tale rules and turns preconceptions on their head with her trademark understated humour. It doesn't matter how many times I read this, it always makes me chuckle out loud and Howl, Sophie and Calcifer the fire demon are probably my favourite DWJ characters.A note to anyone who has seen the Miyazaki film: really, beyond the basic storyline of Sophie being turned into an old lady, going in search of her fortune and bumping into Howl, there is very little similarity. Howl is much more brilliantly arrogant and flamboyant and much less petulant in the book than the film, the Witch of the Waste much more vicious and less mischevious. I will add that I still very much enjoyed the film and think that Miyazaki's Witch is absolutely brilliant. It's just a shame that Howl and Sophie become a bit drippy and that Howl becomes some sort of bird thing rather than just Welsh!
  • (4/5)
    A fun, playful sort of book. Having finished the book, I promptly began again at the beginning as I wanted to figure out what had actually happened. I think some of it is impossible to figure out, but I am eager to read the sequel nonetheless.
  • (3/5)
    Meh, I can sort of see the appeal but it never quite worked for me, over the top humour trying too hard to be funny (and failing), without enough world building or explanation.There's a wicked witch about, but most people are more scared of the big black castle that's appeared on the moorlands. Although it never quite seems to be in the same place it hasn't actually done anyone any harm. When you're the oldest of three daughters you know you're in for a life of drudgery and toil, and so susan prepares herself to sell hats to anyone who wants one. However it turns out that this has angered the Witch, who curses Susan to be Old. She takes this opportunity to make a new start and flees town, unsurprisingly ending up in the castle.The castle is inhabited by a tame demon and the magician Howl and his apprentice, and they're none too keen to tangel with the Witch. The only interesting feature really is the portal doorway which opens on different worlds - set by Howl it can't readily be changed. Howl is a bit of ladies' man and spends more time courting and breaking hearts than he does anything else. Susan get son with the cleaning. Lots of coincidences occur. The end.There's no explanations, there's no development, there's no interest. Howl apparently comes from Wales, but there's no reason why this should be, or how he ended up in the castle. He goes back to visit occasionally but there's no sign that this is though odd in any way. I'm sure it was influential in it's time, but it's a sad parody now at best.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. It had a great plot with many twists and turns that kept me enthralled until the very end.
  • (4/5)
    FANTASTIC READ.

    Howl's Moving Castle starts off slow, with a lot of internal thought-processing from Sophie for most of the first...oh, four chapters, which can get a bit much (and made it rather difficult to start). But once she gets on board Howl's castle, the plot picks up TREMENDOUSLY. The creation of Howl's character was perfectly genius! The complexity in him - the way he was brave and forthright while also just selfish and spoiled was really artfully done. And incredibly, wonderfully humorous!!

    And I cannot rave enough about the depth and intrigue in the plot. As someone who has had a lifelong love of John Donne's poems, I was THRILLED BEYOND MEASURE to realized I was reading a book where the crux of the plot stemmed from a poem written by him!! And the way in which it was used was truly innovative.

    My only other concern was that there were moments in-between where the plot actually got too confusing. There were several times when I had to go back and reread (slowly) chapters at a time so I could make sense of what was happening. But otherwise, this is an immensely pleasurable, fascinating read!
  • (4/5)
    "Charming" is the word I would use for this novel! It is true that I started by watching the Ghibli anime a few years ago. However, this made me delay reading the novel because I felt that the anime would impact on it. Now that I don't remember the anime in details, or just snippets, I therefore felt confident enough to read the novel. I enjoyed the characterisation very much, and Howl's character is not so much explicit but shown by his actions and manners. Sophie's inner voice is full of humour and sensitivity, she is reasonable but doesn't impose her point of view on others, she keeps to herself and tries to reform Howl's behaviour by being exemplary herself. The end of the novel is full of sensibility and doesn't fall into into too much romance and this is appreciated.This novel is sure to please Young Adult readers, as much as adult ones looking for a bit of magic and sensitivity in a novel, likeable characters and funny situations.
  • (5/5)
    This is an amazing book, my only regret is that i never read it as a child so i could amplify the feeling. It is beautifully written, and exploits the concept of beauty in every scale. How we in our youth are too caught up with our looks to sometimes realize whats in front of us.
    This story explores that same theme with Sophie a young girl who, due to an evil spell cast by the witch of the waste, was turned into an old woman. In her journey to turn back young she was able to develop from a scared mouse to a woman able to face any kind of hardship. She became wise enough to know how to handle a man to whom beauty meant everything.
    With that she taught him love lies behind many faces, even those withered and old.
  • (3/5)
    Although I had a bit of fun with this (and couldn't keep from imagining that Howl was created for Johnny Depp to portray him) overall I thought it a bit of a messy effort, much like the character Sophie's often ill-considered ventures. There's a lot of humor, some excellent characterization, and some nifty magic, but no real framework for the world we're visiting. Too many instances where it seemed Howl's skills ought to have been equal to sorting things out, and too many contorted set-ups just to keep the castle moving, as it were. Of course, real life is often messy and disordered, and people frequently fail to do the simplest thing that might make the most sense...but I wasn't reading about real life, was I? I did enjoy the nod to John Donne; his "Song: Go and Catch a Falling Star", the basis of a witch's curse, gave what little structure there was to the story line here, but it was a pretty wobbly construction. A weak 3 stars.
  • (4/5)
    If you like Diana Wynne Jones, you'll probably like this. I did. It was different than the movie, but I definitely liked them both.
  • (5/5)
    Phenomenal. I bought the trilogy after watching Hayao Miyazaki's animated version (which I honestly feel like helped spread word of the books in a great way) and I was not disappointed. There were a few interesting differences between the characters in the book (ages, combined characters in the film, added character relationships/dynamics, etc.) but I actually really appreciate the movie more in a weird way. I am a little sad to hear that Sophie and Howl aren't the main characters in the next two novels, but they are supporting characters (or so I am told) so I'm not devastated. (less)
  • (5/5)
    I never had a huge desire to read this book because the movie made it seem like an odd story, which I have never seen. But I should have known to judge a book by the movie. I was hooked by the description when I was searching the under five dollars ebooks on B&N. This book remains me of the whimsy of p. Wrede's calling on dragons series. This story is set in a land of evil witches and morally gray wizards and other magics that keeps you reading. While there were parts of the story line I found predictable, there were other parts that kept me reading. Jones' ability for storytelling and just enough description to allow your imagination to guide you the rest of the way makes this a book I would recommend.
  • (3/5)
    A nice magical story, but I think I read it too fast to really appreciate it. It seemed to jump around a lot and didn't really come together that well in the end.