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The Two Princesses of Bamarre

The Two Princesses of Bamarre

Escrito por Gail Carson Levine

Narrado por January LaVoy


The Two Princesses of Bamarre

Escrito por Gail Carson Levine

Narrado por January LaVoy

avaliações:
4.5/5 (50 avaliações)
Comprimento:
6 horas
Editora:
Lançado em:
May 2, 2017
ISBN:
9780062690494
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

A kingdom beset by monsters . . .
A disease that weakens and destroys . . .
An epic poem and a hero of long ago . . .
A story of danger and desperation.

The two princesses of Bamarre couldn't be more different. Princess Addie is fearful and shy. Her deepest wish is for safety. Princess Meryl is bold and brave. Her deepest wish is to save the kingdom of Bamarre. They are sisters, and they mean the world to each other.

Then disaster strikes, and Addie-terrified and unprepared-sets out on a perilous quest. In her path are monsters of Bamarre: ogres, specters, gryphons, and dragons. Addie must battle them, but time is running out, and the sisters' lives-and Barmarre's fate-hang in the balance.

Gail Carson Levine left her mark on fantasy with her well-loved 1998 Newbery Honor Book Ella Enchanted. Now she has created another shimmering and tapestried landscape of fantasy and fairies. Bamarre and the journeys of its two princesses will burn themselves into the minds of readers, and all will relish this moving saga about two sisters groping their way toward heroism.

Editora:
Lançado em:
May 2, 2017
ISBN:
9780062690494
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Gail Carson Levine's first book for children, Ella Enchanted, was a Newbery Honor Book. Levine's other books include Ever, a New York Times bestseller; Fairest, a Best Book of the Year for Publishers Weekly and School Library Journal, and a New York Times bestseller; Dave at Night, an ALA Notable Book and Best Book for Young Adults; The Wish; The Two Princesses of Bamarre; A Tale of Two Castles; and the six Princess Tales books. She is also the author of the nonfiction books Writing Magic: Creating Stories That Fly and Writer to Writer: From Think to Ink, as well as the picture books Betsy Who Cried Wolf and Betsy Red Hoodie. Gail Carson Levine and her husband, David, live in a two-centuries-old farmhouse in the Hudson Valley of New York State.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre The Two Princesses of Bamarre

4.4
50 avaliações / 22 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    I wasn't expecting this to be quite as good as it was, but I was happily surprised. Princess Addie lets herself be ruled by fear, while her sister fights fear head on. When her sister finds an adventure she can not defeat, Addie has to finally face her fears and find the strength within herself. She does it- and goes on quite an adventure to boot. The story is engaging, and one I might come back to again.
  • (4/5)
    I LOVED this book as a kid.
  • (4/5)
    In a land where a disease, the Grey Death, kills many there lives two sisters, princesses called Meryl and Addie. Meryl is the brave one and Addie is timid. When Meryl is stricken with the disease Addie has to overcome many obstacles, not least of which is her own timidity, to find a cure.It does read like a fairy tale, an interesting story of honour and striving to do what is best to defeat the evil that seems unsurmountable. A story about growing up and growing into yourself.
  • (5/5)
    A princess goes on a quest to find the cure for a deadly sickness (The Gray Death) when her sister is struck by it. On her way, she encounters many dangers and adventures.
  • (3/5)
    Good fairy tale story. Not as good as Ella Enchanted, but in my opinion better than most of Levine's other recent fairy tale stories. Younger readers will really enjoy.
  • (3/5)
    It started slow, the characters didn't interest me much at first. But thankfully it got better, good chara development, fast paced more adventure and a nice twist. 3/5
  • (4/5)
    The Two Princesses of Bamarre is a fairy tale about two princesses—one shy, the other adventurous. The shy princess has to sally forth into strange lands to rescue her ailing sister. She overcomes many fears, realizing that she, too, can be a hero. This is a sweet story, with adventure and romance. It is appropriate for girls starting at perhaps age 10. It was not as magical as Levine’s other books in this series (Ella Enchanted and Ever), but it is worth reading nonetheless.
  • (4/5)
    This is a book for young adult girls, but I found the reading level to be just high enough and the writing to be done so well that I truly did enjoy it.
  • (5/5)
    I first heard of this book when I was looking for "Ella Enchanted" by the same author. I bought both books at the same time, and I loved this one just as much as the other.
  • (4/5)
    This book is wonderful!It tells of two sisters who are as different as day and night but still love each other. The book is filled with action,suspence and love.
  • (4/5)
    A bit predictable, a bit light, but full of fun characters and delightful dialogue. It would be worth reading the book just for the conversations between Addie and the dragon who holds her prisoner for awhile.
  • (4/5)
    Even 15 years later, this book still makes me cry (I'm 22 now). This book, although written for younger children, is great for anyone who wants a light and exciting read. The story centers on two young princesses, one adventurous and brave (Meryl), the other more quiet and reserved (Addie). When a deadly sickness strikes Meryl, Addie is determined to set aside her fears and go out in search of the cure. There are fairies and dragons, wizards and demons, adventure and romance, and one hell of an ending that still gives me goosebumps and causes me to tear up. I recommend this book to anyone, young or old, girl or boy, who wants a good old-fashioned fairy tale adventure.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. I had read Enchanted first; it has more humor in it. But this one has its share. It is about two princesses and a kingdom beset by magical creatures of ill intent and the Gray Death. The princesses have lost their mother to the Gray Death. Princess Meryl, the eldest, is a swashbuckling hero type and is determined to go out into the kingdom and find the cure for the Gray Death. Addie, her younger sister is timid, and afraid of a number of things. Her older sister has always protected her. Addie is good at embroidery and art. Then Meryl becomes ill with the always fatal Gray Death. Addie, who has made her sister promise not to go out seeking the cure until after she's married, is beside herself and after a cowardly effort on her father's part to find the cure, decides she must go herself. It is a marvelous tale, probably more appropriate for girls age 10 and up.
  • (4/5)
    I credit this book with teaching me how to read out loud or give public speeches. One scene depicts declaiming, the recitation of poetry, and reading it deeply affected me. The descriptions of a girl declaiming, with her voice rising, falling, and changing to match the subject matter of the poem have stayed with me to this day, and I now try to use them whenever I am called upon to speak. I truly believe that this book has made me a better public speaker. While it is secondary to the plot, the declaiming scene is very dear to my heart.
  • (5/5)
    Even better than Ella Enchanted. One of my all time favorite children's books.
  • (4/5)
    Good YA fantasy about two princesses, in a kingdom plagued by the dread disease, the Grey Death. When one of the princesses gets the Grey Death, the other sister, who is not brave, has to find her courage to get the cure.
  • (5/5)
    Still one of my very favorites no matter how old I am. Great to have it in audiobook form!
  • (5/5)
    This was one of my favorite books when I was a kid and read it every year in middle school. I’ve always love adventure/fantasy and this one fulfilled both. It has always been one of my inspirations to write. And I’m glad to have gone back and reread it.
  • (4/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    This is one of my favorite middle-grade books! I first read it when I was about 10, and I've even read it a few times since then. This is a very cute story about the adventures of two princesses, one fighting for her life and the other fighting to save her. Gail Carson Levine certainly knows how to tell a good fairytale. This book is so much fun, and I'd definitely recommend it to any young girls who like princesses who can rescue themselves.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (1/5)
    I'm afraid I'm a dissenting voice in a sea of love here. I didn't like this book a bit. I found the plot tired, the characters cut from cardboard, and the writing phoned in. I felt like I'd read this story a hundred times already. Simplistic, predictable and wearying.
  • (1/5)
    Didn't care for this...weird magic...not that great story..not that it was too predictable, the adventure was ok, a sort of coming of age story..just the rest of the story was kind of flat/blah/empty...not that great ending, (anticlimactic!)..almost an allegory to cancer...kind of depressing. It left me with an indescribable feeling of being "off".

    I got rid of it.
  • (3/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    The two princesses of the title are beloved sisters, Addie and Meryl. However, their personalities couldn't be more different. Meryl longs for adventure, but Addie is shy and timid. But when Meryl is struck by the dreaded Gray Death, Addie is motivated by necessity to strike out on her own and seek the source of and cure for the disease that is epidemic in her land. Alone, she must face a dragon and learn that she too can be brave.
    This was an entertaining enough light fantasy, but considering that the author is a Newbery-Honor winner, I expected more from it. It was a little too "message"-y as far as the "coming of age" theme, and I didn't really enjoy the somewhat silly personality of the dragon. I also felt it really neglected the stated situation that the Gray Death was a serious epidemic in the country, but all the way through, Addie really cares only about her sister, not about her people who are suffering equally - and that's never really addressed.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil