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Catch-22: A Novel

Catch-22: A Novel

Escrito por Joseph Heller

Narrado por Jay O. Sanders


Catch-22: A Novel

Escrito por Joseph Heller

Narrado por Jay O. Sanders

avaliações:
4/5 (257 avaliações)
Comprimento:
19 horas
Lançado em:
Aug 29, 2017
ISBN:
9781508251521
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Nota do editor

A satirical masterpiece…

This satirical masterpiece brilliantly captures the bureaucratic absurdities of war. With a title that’s become synonymous with an intractable problem, Yossarian & co.’s tragicomic plight resonates to this day.

Descrição

Several decades after its initial publication, Catch-22 remains a cornerstone of American literature and one of the funniest-and most celebrated-novels of all time. In recent years it has been named to "best novels" lists by Time, Newsweek, the Modern Library, and the London Observer.

Set in Italy during World War II, this is the story of the incomparable, malingering bombardier, Yossarian, a hero who is furious because thousands of people he has never met are trying to kill him. But his real problem is not the enemy-it is his own army, which keeps increasing the number of missions the men must fly to complete their service. Yet if Yossarian makes any attempt to excuse himself from the perilous missions he's assigned, he'll be in violation of Catch-22, a hilariously sinister bureaucratic rule: a man is considered insane if he willingly continues to fly dangerous combat missions, but if he makes a formal request to be removed from duty, he is proven sane and therefore ineligible to be relieved. Since its publication in 1961, no novel has matched Catch-22's intensity and brilliance in depicting the brutal insanity of war.

Lançado em:
Aug 29, 2017
ISBN:
9781508251521
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Joseph Heller was born in Brooklyn in 1923. In 1961, he published Catch-22, which became a bestseller and, in 1970, a film. He went on to write such novels as Good as Gold, God Knows, Picture This, Closing Time, and Portrait of an Artist, as an Old Man. Heller died in 1999.

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257 avaliações / 256 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    Each day I come across Catch-22 situation, thamks to this book I can give them a proper name
  • (5/5)
    Best book ever written.
  • (5/5)
    It's rare to read a book where each sentence seems to have carefully chosen words that string together in perfect balance on the page. The novel seems to be more about the words than about the plot of the novel. There are many characters and I was glad I kept some notes to keep track of them. I would get lost in the story, but always enjoyed the words.
  • (5/5)
    Catch-22 is one of the funniest, weirdest, most unique novels I’ve ever read. It presents the story of Yossarian, a World War II bombardier who is constantly inventing illnesses and ailments in hilarious attempts to prevent himself from having to fly dangerous missions, which is a realistic concerned, given that whole armies—thousands of people—are trying to kill him. The government bureaucracy is always one step ahead of poor Yossarian, though, and his attempts are thwarted by Colonel Cathcart, who constantly raises the number of missions the men must fly in order to fulfill their service.Heller’s characters and their experiences of army life are hysterical, maddening, and utterly mad, and his satire is spot-on. Catch-22 is a classic that should be on every bookshelf, whores and all.Full review at The Book Lady's Blog
  • (5/5)
    First read this superb dystopian anti-war novel in 1970: Couldn't put it down; such a great read, but must have as the copy long ago went missing.Finally replenished my library & having re-read I was amazed at just how well Heller's writing stands up to modern day equivalents based on the hard-learned experiences of modern warfare.Heller's book detailing the catastrophic mental and physical anguish of Yossarian (surely one of the greatest 'human' characters in all of literature) is one of very few 'warfare' masterpieces to emerge post-WW2.The novel surpasses Jones' From Here To Eternity (&, different war, but as relevant Remarque's All Quiet On The Western Front) for its devastatingly accurate portrayal of the ordinary soldier trapped within the vast & supremely indifferent High Command mince-making machinery of a so-called 'strategic war effort'.It ranks alongside Red Badge of Courage, For Whom The Bell Tolls, The Debacle, & Regeneration as an epic narration of man's inhumanity & humanity.
  • (2/5)
    I'm another person who couldn't finish this book. I tried, mainly so that I wouldn't have to return it to my friend with an apology for detesting one of his favorites. Maybe two-thirds of the way through I had to give up.

    The rambling repetitiveness in the narrative is, I think, supposed to represent the futility of the characters' struggles, their insanity, and the how the war would never really end for them. Unfortunately, it was just too much circular non-logic to tolerate.

    Another problem for me was the way the story jerked between bitter satire, outrageous farce, and annoying accounts of everyday drama.

    Heller's depiction of World War II seemed more fitting for a government office than a warfront. Even if that is how he remembered the war, the setting didn't feel real. I didn't care about any of the characters and often struggled to tell them apart. The plot was inconsequential. I felt that I was wasting my time once I'd absorbed the gist of the book.
  • (1/5)
    Just tried reading this book, and for one of the rare instances in life, threw it away in loathing. I love the classics (Orwell, Steinbeck, Algren, Twain, et al.), but this one was like trying to get through a literary tribute to Abbott & Costello... just filled with snarky one-liner jokes that fell flat pretty much every effort. Satire is one thing, canned-ham commentary that goes over 400 pages is too much. We get it; war is absurd. There just was very little original insight here. Cool, Heller came up with the Catch-22 term. Not cool he pounds it into your head every single scene.
  • (4/5)
    A subversive classic.
  • (4/5)
    Groucho Marx channeled by angry, word-bloated 1950s English major on speed flying off the handle about war.

  • (3/5)
    I read this when it came out, understood the catch and marveled at the total inefficiency of the military (as with Hemingway). Then I read it again in 2013 while vacationing in Scotland. It is still a very good book (for about 200 pages) and I discovered that there were many catches, not just 22. I still laughed out loud a few times as I did 60 years ago but fatigue set in about 1/2 the way through for me. Each later chapter was just an earlier chapter with different characters dressed in new clothes but speaking the same convoluted language until it became mind-numbing. The "I did..I didn't" constructions appeared to be written just for the sake of writing them in later chapters rather than indicating crazy people and crazy thinking.The Milo Minderbinder character and his exploits (e.g. contracting with the Nazis) became extremely annoying; he became the most outlandish and unrealistic character in the book. I finally skipped later chapters when he was the focus. My new conclusion, this book should have been pared down by half (to about 220 pages) since it is so repetitive.
  • (4/5)
    major major majorly good.
  • (5/5)
    Best book ever? Quite possibly.
  • (2/5)
    This book is not funny. I don't get it.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books I ever read.
  • (5/5)
    brilliant and hillarious.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books I ever read.
  • (3/5)
    This was a re-read from long-long ago. The book remains very funny. The fun however is very much the same the whole work long and consequently becomes somewhat stale after a while. AS an exercise in bureaucratic logic it should be required reading for eveybody facing the bureaucratic machinery and for those manning the machine. It will be an even battle with some hope of overcoming Kafka's nightmares in the end.
  • (5/5)
    My first read was when I was in 10th grade and I fell in love.

    This book turned into a survival guide for me the whole time I worked for the state, the whole time I was in the military. Or at least it made me feel as if someone else knew what was going on.

    And I always wanted to meet some one named Major Major Major.
  • (4/5)
    Loved it. Sometimes it's the absurdity that comes closest to the truth.
  • (5/5)
    This book will always have a special place in my heart as it was the very first book I ever went to the store and purchased using my own money I earned at a job. No idea where THAT copy of the book is, I only seem to have an old $0.75 mass market pb from the early sixties that must've been my dad's.
  • (5/5)
    Catch-22 is a modern classic set during World War II. The narrative is non-linear and the situations are often absurd. If you enjoy films such as Pulp Fiction or Memento, then you should give this book a read. If you are a fan of Kurt Vonnegut, then you will love Joseph Heller.I first read Catch-22 when I was on Active Duty in 2002 and I loved every word. It made me laugh out loud on a regular basis - something that is out of character for me. There is a lot of truth behind the insanity presented by Joseph Heller.Highly recommended. This book is a classic for a reason!
  • (4/5)
    I've been hearing about this book so long now, I finally decided it was time to pick it up and get it over and done with. Boy, am I glad I did. To me, Catch-22 is somewhat like marmite. You'll either love it or you'll hate it. There is no grey area. I happen to love it. This book is filled with so many colourful characters that you'll end up loving them all. You go through so many emotions that by the end of the book, you're exhausted. I grasped Heller's writing style right off the bat. He is a unique and clever writer.The story follows Captain Joseph Yossarian, a US airman trying to survive the madness of the Second World War. I think it's a great depiction of modern mentality. Frankly, I don't think it's only the war that is insane ... Life itself is insane - a Catch-22, so to speak.Much of the prose is repetitive, which would usually bother me, but I found it to be tolerable. The only problem I had was with the length of the book. The story dragged on at times, and I found I wanted to get through those parts quickly. It would have been better if the book was shorter. All the same, I found this read to be very refreshing, and I plan on reading it again someday.One of my favourite line from the book:There was only one catch and that was Catch-22, which specified that a concern for one's safety in the face of dangers that were real and immediate was the process of a rational mind. Orr was crazy and could be grounded. All he had to do was ask; and as soon as he did, he would no longer be crazy and would have to fly more missions. Orr would be crazy to fly more missions and sane if he didn't, but if he were sane he had to fly them. If he flew them he was crazy and didn't have to; but if he didn't want to he was sane and had to. Yossarian was moved very deeply by the absolute simplicity of this clause of Catch-22 and let out a respectful whistle.
  • (4/5)
    To Wind up 2007, our group took up the 'Catch 22 Challenge' and it has proven to be such a large literary chunk to bite off, that we decided to extend it into January '08. A few of us simply could not continue, finding the read too disjointed, wordy or totally uninteresting. But the majority persevered, reaping the rewards of this classic piece of fiction by slowly chipping away at Yossarian and his battle with World War II hypocrisy.There is no doubt Catch 22 is a difficult read. The dialogue is a collection of rambling reminiscings from battle fatiqued Captain Yossarian of the 256th Squadron. His one and only wish is to return home, never to kill (or be killed) again.One of the many discussions we were able to have regarding this book included why it became so popular and made its way onto the modern classics list.Some suggestions were the unconventional views on war, style, setting, content. We also discussed the psychological results of war and how the long duration of front line fighting can affect personalities. In our second meeting, Jeanette read a piece near the end that put it all pretty much in perspective. The catch of Catch 22 is that is doesn't exist, so "there is no object or text to ridicule, refute, to accuse, critisize, attack, amend, hate, revile, spit at, rip to shreds, trample upon or burn up."Love or hate it, Catch 22 does stir the imagination and gives a new angle to story telling. We get the impression Heller took a chance with this one and hit a chord with readers ready for something different. He has not been able to repeat the success and rarely does such a masterpiece come from an author more than once. In the world of fiction, Heller's style has been copied, more or less successfully since and for those of us who want plenty of meat in our fiction we can only be thankful for such a contribution.
  • (5/5)
    Hard to start, hard to finish, this is the most hilariously serious and important book I've read - I think ever. Some books have been more important, some have been funnier, but none both at the same time. I find it hard to imagine that the US dared go to war after this book was published in 1961. I have no problem at all understanding why this is one of the most important books of the 20th Century.
  • (5/5)
    A lot of people did not quite get the humor, but I am one of those who found this book hilarious. Heller's full sense of humor is epitomized in his most popular work. The story, the characters, and the dialogue had me laughing a lot throughout.
  • (5/5)
    This is pretty much my most favorite book ever. It's hilarious, it's poignant, it's just the best!
  • (4/5)
    Catch-22 is a very different book than what I normally read. It is very comical, crazy, and confusing, but Joseph Heller somehow mixes all of the craziness together to create a somewhat sensible piece of literature. This is not one of my favorite books, but it is quite funny at times.The story takes place during World War II. The protagonist, Yossarian, is part of one the US Air Force bomb squadrons stationed in Pianosa in Europe. The war is in full swing and the squadron members continue their missions to help with the war. The actual story line of the book is very confusing. It seems like the book is made up of small little anecdotes focusing on different member's lives and experiences, but they all tie together through common characters. Some of the stories seem to be out of order chronologically at some points and made me slightly confused. Also, the characters occasionally reference events that have not been talked about in depth, further adding to the confusion.The characters in the book were some of the best I have ever read about. Each had specific quirks and problems that persisted consistently throughout the book. Each interaction between them always seems realistic and crazy. Each character left a unique impression on me as I read through the book. Some characters were cowards, intellects, or just plain weird. I found myself becoming attached to them and every event had a much stronger emotional impact.Large picture aside, the dialogue and events in the book are very funny. The characters constantly contradict themselves and their compatriots and create ridiculous problems. Their antics lead to sometimes unwanted results, but they always take everything in good humor. Some of the events are much more serious however, but Heller was still able to put a slight twist in them to make it a little more funny.The contradictions, however, created a lot of confusion for me. I found myself lost and puzzled by what exactly happened at some points in the book. I would go back and try to reread the section and I usually was able to decipher the true meaning of what exactly occurred. However, there were a few times where I was forced to continue even though I did not have an understanding of what happen. This made the book a much harder chore to read than most, and it caused me to put down the book more times than I would have liked.Catch-22 is a amazingly funny book. The characters were some of the most special and witty characters I have ever met. The story was very intriguing and the dialogue was comical. There is no other book I have ever read that is anything like Catch-22. However, I found myself not wanting to read the book a few times. The events created a very confusing setting to follow. If you take the time to really read and understand the book, Catch-22 is very wonderful.
  • (4/5)
    The genius of this book is that, while it starts out as an irreverent take on war, full of black and absurdist humour (almost too absurd to take seriously), by book's end the brutal accounting and emotion of Heller's writing takes the reader by the throat. I particularly admire how the author withholds the complete details of crucial incidents in Yossarian's life until the very end, where full the visceral horror of war is on display.Also worth noting that Catch 22, for me, is one of those rare books that have both a memorable first AND last lines.
  • (3/5)
    Set in WWII, a bomber group off the coast of Italy. A bombadier struggles with the insanity of war where everyone - including his own side - is out to kill him. Very funny in spots - like laugh out loud funny - and very sad and depressing in others. Liked it alot.
  • (2/5)
    I'm not actually going to finish it. I'm about halfway through (Chapter 21), and I wanted to stick it out, because there are things I like about the book. But I'm enjoying it less and less, and I don't think it's going to redeem itself.

    My chief complaint is that the humor is wearing thin. Heller keeps leaning on the same kinds of jokes--twisted, circuitous dialogue that ends in frustration and misunderstanding all around. It's funny at first, but the effectiveness of the technique is more and more sporadic as the story goes on. The narrative structure of the book has a similar gimmick--the story twists and turns through time, wrapping around and through itself repeatedly in an obvious metaphor for the bureaucracy that Heller is sending up. Applied in this broader way it's fine, and doesn't really hurt anything--it might actually work to the benefit of the book, though not greatly so. But on the smaller scale, it gets monotonous.

    Nearly as big a problem, though, is the misogyny that permeates the book. Again, this is obviously intentional, and surely it's supposed to reflect poorly on the male characters (as well as probably reflecting poorly on the institution of the army, the situation of war, etc.). But mostly, it's just disgusting. It's no fun to go through, and comes up awfully frequently. Heller's slapstick satire isn't really a robust enough tool to probe this issue in a sustained way. One or two such instances in the book would be poignant. The dozens of them that riddle it, though, strip away any meaning that might briefly have been there.

    I'm vacillating between 1 & 2 stars for this book. Because while it has some good writing and interesting aspects, it's overly indulgent in a way that amplifies its weaknesses. If it were a shorter novel, it might work quite well. So in the end, I think it's too simplistic to just give it the lowest rating, and I'm going to go with 2 stars. But I certainly don't recommend reading it.