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Damsel

Damsel

Escrito por Elana K. Arnold

Narrado por Elizabeth Knowelden


Damsel

Escrito por Elana K. Arnold

Narrado por Elizabeth Knowelden

avaliações:
3.5/5 (47 avaliações)
Comprimento:
7 horas
Editora:
Lançado em:
Oct 2, 2018
ISBN:
9780062890238
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

A dark, twisted, unforgettable fairy tale from Elana K. Arnold, author of the National Book Award finalist What Girls Are Made Of

The rite has existed for as long as anyone can remember: When the king dies, his son the prince must venture out into the gray lands, slay a fierce dragon, and rescue a damsel to be his bride. This is the way things have always been.

When Ama wakes in the arms of Prince Emory, she knows none of this. She has no memory of what came before she was captured by the dragon or what horrors she faced in its lair. She knows only this handsome young man, the story he tells of her rescue, and her destiny of sitting on a throne beside him. It's all like a dream, like something from a fairy tale.

As Ama follows Emory to the kingdom of Harding, however, she discovers that not all is as it seems. There is more to the legends of the dragons and the damsels than anyone knows, and the greatest threats may not be behind her, but around her, now, and closing in.

Editora:
Lançado em:
Oct 2, 2018
ISBN:
9780062890238
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Elana K. Arnold is the author of critically acclaimed and award-winning young adult novels and children’s books, including the Printz Honor winner Damsel and the National Book Award finalist What Girls Are Made Of. Several of her books are Junior Library Guild selections and have appeared on many best book lists, including the Amelia Bloomer Project, a catalog of feminist titles for young readers. Elana teaches in Hamline University’s MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults program and lives in Southern California with her family and menagerie of pets. You can visit her online at www.elanakarnold.com.  

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Damsel

3.7
47 avaliações / 7 Análises
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Classificação: 0 de 5 estrelas

Avaliações de leitores

  • (3/5)
    To become king of Harding, the prince must always slay a dragon and rescue a damsel. That’s how it’s been as long as anyone can remember: prince, damsel, then a queen who has one son, who becomes the next prince/king. Emory duly rescues Ama, who has no memory of the time before she was rescued. Emory is handsome and charming, but also sexist and frightening. Will Ama figure out a way to survive in Harding? The book is basically about the vicious lottery of patriarchy: it is true that there is a prize or two out there, if you are very lucky in both your endowments and your choices—but will you stay lucky forever, even if you are so now? I guess I see what Arnold was trying to do, but it seemed pretty heavy-handed—many men conflate the phallus (in the psychoanalytic sense) with the penis, but reading about it is still not fun. And Ama is structurally isolated from other women and not particularly interested in helping them.
  • (4/5)
    For Prince Emory to become king, he must travel to a far land, defeat a dragon, rescue a damsel, and bring her back to his kingdom to be his queen. This is how generations of kings have become rulers in the kingdom of Harding. But when Emory rescues Ama, who doesn't remember anything at all before then, Ama begins to question her past, her role in the tradition, and Emory's true motivation for slaying the dragon.The story is a clever one - I love a good rule-breaking, I-don't-want-to-be-a-princess princess - but the execution felt off. I'm generally not at all a prude about sex in books, but the encounters in this one seemed unnecessarily, um, something. Not graphic, really, but just, well, crude? Maybe just unnecessary. I will say that the author does a good job of making the reader really uncomfortable for the damsel, and she achieves this mostly through making Emory an absolute tool and in a very realistic way. I think the not-really-graphic-but-something's-off-about-it sex bits are a part of that, and they work in that way, sort of, but I think I still could have done without them. I'm fixating on this, aren't I? Apologies. One more thing that bothered me: the ending was too abrupt and oddly violent (oddly in the sense that the character who commits the troubling violence doesn't seem the type to do so at all right up until it happens, and so I was jarred out of the narrative because of it). I think the main issue, for me, was that Arnold is trying to go dark with this one, but approaches it in the wrong way, so instead of profound and intense, she ends up with troubling and ew.
  • (4/5)
    Wow, what a blistering take on the age old tale of rescuing a damsel. This dark, thematic young adult book is really NC 17 - there is a lot of sexual abuse, self-harm, and harassment in this book - spoiler alert. The book opens with Prince Emory traveling to a far off land to slay a dragon and rescue a damsel. He must successfully bring a damsel back to his kingdom to be wed or he will never be king. For as far back as anyone can remember, the cycle has always remained the same; slay a dragon, rescue a damsel, wed her, impregnate her with one son, who will then turn around and repeat the process when it is his turn to be king. For Ama, this is all new. She has no memories before being rescued by Prince Emory; she has to take his word for everything and trust that he knows best. As she tries to adjust to her new place in the castle with her pet lynx; Ama realizes that she is unhappy, why shouldn't she get a say in her? She is constantly talked down to, bossed around, taken advantage of, and demeaned; Prince Emory doesn't seem so heroic anymore. Ama wishes she could just remember what life was like before he "rescued" her. Dark, twisted, and wonderful; the ending alone is worth reading this book for!
  • (5/5)
    After ripping his heart from his chest she ought to have said: "Damsel?! fuck you I'm a dragon!" Wow, this was a fantastic fairytale re-telling
  • (5/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    First of all, this book has a fairy tale-like feel but I don't know which fairy tale -- and it isn't a Disney version of a fairy tale. Prince Emory has a goal. He needs to find and kill a dragon and rescue its damsel before he can become king. With his father dying before Emory being fully trained, he is rather on his own in his quest. His mother, the Queen, advises him that he has three weapons -- his brain, his sword, and another she doesn't name -- to help him in his quest. The descriptions of his climb to the dragon's castle and his fight with the dragon are vivid and and show a young man who is determined, self-centered, and certain that his way is the best way to do anything.The story then switches viewpoint and jumps in time to the rescued damsel who comes to consciousness in Emory's arms with no memory of how she got there or what happened before. Emory names her Ama and tells her that she's his destiny. When she briefly walks away to get a look at the world that she doesn't remember, she encounters a lynx pup and its mother. Emory kills the mother and is about to kill the baby when Ama begs for it. She names the pup Sorrow and takes it with her. But Emory tells her that it is a wild animal who can't live in captivity and which he will get rid of before their wedding. Ama is determined to find a way to keep her pet. She is put under the tutelage of Emory's friend who is the castle falconer who tries to teach her to break her pet's spirit in order to train it. Ama quickly sees that she is also being broken and trained to be Emory's wife. Meeting Emory's mother does nothing to change her opinion about her fate but, with no past, she doesn't seem to have any other options for her future.She becomes ill in the leadup to the wedding and the only thing that seems to help her is spending time in the heat near where the glassblower fashions his art and the eyes that decorate the city walls. Ama soon convinces him to let her work with glass and the work and heat help her to uncover secrets from her past and plan a course for her future.I enjoyed this story despite the fact that is was rather dark and grim, but because of the sexual issues and content, would recommend it for older young adults.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (5/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    This is not the Prince-rescues-Princess-from-Dragon book you expect, but it may very well be the book that you—or someone you know—needs.

    Embrace your Sorrow.

    Free your Fury.

    Be the Dragon.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (3/5)
    I have sat on this review all night because I really don’t know what to say other than that was weird. It obviously kept my attention because I finished it quickly but it’s not one of my favorites. Parts of it had me wondering. But that cover.... for that it gets 3?