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Thin Air: A Jessica Shaw Thriller

Thin Air: A Jessica Shaw Thriller

Escrito por Lisa Gray

Narrado por Amy Landon


Thin Air: A Jessica Shaw Thriller

Escrito por Lisa Gray

Narrado por Amy Landon

avaliações:
4/5 (20 avaliações)
Comprimento:
8 horas
Lançado em:
Jun 1, 2019
ISBN:
9781721358281
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

She investigates missing persons—now she is one.

Private investigator Jessica Shaw is used to getting anonymous tips. But after receiving a photo of a three-year-old kidnapped from Los Angeles twenty-five years ago, Jessica is stunned to recognize the little girl as herself.

Eager for answers, Jessica heads to LA's dark underbelly. When she learns that her biological mother was killed the night she was abducted, Jessica's determined to solve a case the police have forgotten. Meanwhile, veteran LAPD detective Jason Pryce is in the midst of a gruesome investigation into a murdered college student moonlighting as a prostitute. A chance encounter leads to them crossing paths, but Jessica soon realizes that Pryce is hiding something about her father's checkered history and her mother's death.

To solve her mother's murder and her own disappearance, Jessica must dig into the past and find the secrets buried there. But the air gets thinner as she crawls closer to the truth, and it's getting harder and harder to breathe.

Lançado em:
Jun 1, 2019
ISBN:
9781721358281
Formato:
Audiolivro

Sobre o autor

Lisa Gray worked in animal rescue for years, specializing in raising newborn kittens. She also ran a non-profit organization that helped people spay and neuter their pets. Currently living on a river in northern Michigan with five cats and one husband, she spends her free time bird-watching and critter-watching.


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3.9
20 avaliações / 15 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    I am such a sucker for amnesia stories.
  • (3/5)
    It wasn't as good as some of the other books in the series but the idea of Joanne getting to view memories from others was an interesting bit of character development and it forms a good bridge for future installments.
  • (4/5)
    Jo had lost her memory at the end of the last book, and spends this novel trying to figure out who she is while also discovering she should be battling demons sent to basically destroy the earth. I've been impressed with this series as Caine has created a complex, sympathetic, yet strong character in Joanne Baldwin. This series continually reminds me of the Harry Dresden series, both are outstanding.
  • (3/5)
    After five excellent, fast paced books, this one felt like something of a let down. Having the main character develop amnesia is a lame plot device in many stories, and whilst I could understand its purpose here, it still irritated the heck out of me. I think because to make amnesia work in a story, the reader has to have exactly as much knowledge as the main character retains, with them slowly realising the bigger picture as the character does. Because we are rather used to Jo's life and know all about Eamon and Lewis, David and all the other characters, it just leads to feelings of discomfit instead. Unlike the other books, this one dragged too - the first portion was spend wandering in the frozen forest with very little action or much plot development. Watching Joanne be all meek and submitting to other's instruction was somewhat disappointing too.

    Not a bad read by any means, and I have the remaining three titles waiting here for me to read them - but either this one was a letdown or I've OD'd on the series, because it did not grip me in the same manner.

    And, the fictional town of Seacasket has mysteriously shifted from Maine to New Jersey. Perhaps this was due to the demise of the Fire Oracle? Although, I would say it is more due to the author getting confused. It might not bother Joanne - she's lost her memory, but it sure as heck bothered me - I haven't! It's not even as though the two states are that close to each other.
  • (4/5)
    The saga continues. It's still light and fast easy reading, although it's getting gradually more convoluted as plots twist and turn.This one picks up very much where the last one left off, and moves things forward a bit, the Ma'at ally with the wardens, the Djinn fracture, and we learn a bit more about demons.
  • (4/5)
    What Firestorm lacked, Thin Air has in plenty. This book was such I thrill ride that I stayed up well past midnight on a work night just to get to the end. This book starts with a couple of pages from the end of Firestorm. It sets up the plot where Joanne awakens cold and naked in a forest with no memory. She comes to be rescued by Lewis and David but she can't remember them. Joanne finds out there is a demon that looks like her and has the memories that Ashan had taken from Joanne at the end of Firestorm. Now the demon has her memories, and looks like her, it is slowly taking over Joanne's entire life. Joanne has the ability to get into other people's memories now and we get a peek into Cherise, Kevin, Eamon, and Marion's memories. I especially enjoyed these interludes because they weren't long enough to become dull and yet the were good insights into these characters and their perceptions of Joanne. I like the changes Caine appears to be making and hope they will continue to keep the series fresh. By the end of the book there are four different groups that have to agree to work together at least temporarily. Joanne still has the tendency to have to be bailed out of certain dangerous situations, but she fended for herself here a couple of times and the rest can be explained as necessary due to her memory loss. Yet whatever the exact reasons, I absolutely enjoyed this story. I look forward to the next one.
  • (4/5)
    As usual, my only complaint about Ms. Caine's books is that I want MORE NOW!This was a great emotional roller coaster ride. Joanne goes through hell trying to get her life back after losing her memory in the last book. I hope this isn't the last in the series, because it feels like a whole new chapter in the Warden's world has just begun!
  • (4/5)
    Having been burned in the past by the story gimmick that starts this novel, I wasn't holding out much hope after I got through the first few pages. However, Rachel Caine manages to turn what seemed like a terrible gimmick into a captivating tale that had me flying through the pages until just before the end. Looking forwards to reading the next in the series!
  • (4/5)
    After what seems like forever we finally get to learn what has happened to Joanne as a result of her last, tragic battle. I've been on a roll of sequels lately (this being the fifth "series" book I've read in the last week or two) which is always a risky proposition, but in this case things worked out okay. Without going into spoilers I will generally say that I would highly recommed the entire Weather Warden series to anyone with an interest in urban fantasies along the line of Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden books.
  • (3/5)
    This one was just ok for me. Too much "review." Most of the book centered on Jo finding her memories, and since she had none, we had to be re-introduced to everyone again. On the one hand, I see where it fit with the storyline. On the other hand....why write that storyline??? Caine must have felt we all needed to review everything before she moved on. I don't know.What I do know is that I really had a difficult time sticking with this one. The entire book really felt like an intro to the next story, and not like a book that could stand on its own.And....ok, maybe I'm being picky. And, maybe I'm not remembering things correctly from the several times I've stayed in Las Vegas. But....seems to me that if...as the book says....you're staying in a room in Vegas, and you can see a Sphinx's butt pointing at you, your window slopes, and if you look out your window, the building looks like a pyramid, you're in a room at the LUXOR and not the MGM GRAND. Maybe it's just a small mistake, but it bugged me a LOT. (Maybe because I just stayed at the Luxor myself.) I would like to think she or her editor would have researched that one and fixed it before it went to print. Hopefully it will be caught before the next printing.
  • (3/5)
    I don't usually read these kind of books (the fantasy-romance genre), but I read some of the Morganville Vampire books, and really liked Caine's writing. The books aren't anything too special, but they don't need to be. This is the sixth book in the series and I completely enjoyed reading -- which was the point. Joanne Baldwin can't remember anything and has to fight against, well, evil forces to set things right. I really like how Caine uses this book to answer some questions raised int he previous books, but even more so to build up the story for the next book (which I have yet to read). This book, as with the others, make really good books to lose yourself in.
  • (5/5)
    A masterpiece that leaves you frustrated and questioning your characters until the last page. I have said before that the fifth book in this series was the absolute best book of the series thus far, although, I still feel it to be the best I have to say this is a close second. I did not know how to respond to this story, everything that I had known from the first five books was yanked out from under me in this book. I had the most undescribable feeling of loss when reading this book; with Joannes loss of memory, the loss of Imara, and the distance with all of her loved ones I was undescribably suffering with the characters. Rachel Caine has totally absorbed me into her stories she is an amazing author. Finally I must add she has out done herself again with this story, and I will be continuing this series with Gale Storm.
  • (3/5)
    Ho, hum. Joanne gets carried away by one damn thing after another. A great book if you like your protagonist tortured to death. Yes, the "plot" gets moved along again (in almost an afterward). There is at least one steamy sex scene, but as usual with these continuing sagas, there is more explanation of what came before and more complications on motivations than actual action. But not to worry, there are enough lose ends to carry the story forward into another book.
  • (4/5)
    The amnesia trope is done in a creative and unusual manner and it works for me. The first third of the book has good pacing and is very good. The plot slows for awhile at that point and I found it a little annoying but it picked up again after a few chapters and remained strong for the rest of the book. Jo spent a little too much time being rescued this time around but it went withe amnesia and the book set up far more power for her in the future.

    Some past characters show up (at least one that really feels superfluous). There are some revelations here and answers to a few of my questions that I've been asking since several books ago. The best part is a major turning point in the series which is always refreshing.

    I wanted to deduct a star because at one point, with what seems like impending battle, Jo receives what she sees as the perfect clothes for her including three inch heels. But fortunately the battle was just an indoor debate kind of thing and she has been very good about getting her priorities straight in these later books so I'll let it slide. :)

  • (5/5)
    Every year multitudes of writers launch thrillers. A few rise to the top, and one of these is Thin Air and a new female detective, Jessica Shaw.When the story begins, Jessica opens an email asking her to find a child kidnapped twenty-five years before. Jessica recognizes her three-year-old self in the attached photo. Curiosity will keep the reader turning pages.Gray’s novel ties together two murders, twenty years apart, and point-of-view chapters for Jessica, Amy Ong, Jason Pryce, Eleanor Lavelle. The tie that holds them together is closely guarded until the conclusion. An enjoyable read.