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The Patchwork Girl of Oz

The Patchwork Girl of Oz

Escrito por L. Frank Baum

Narrado por Erin Yuen


The Patchwork Girl of Oz

Escrito por L. Frank Baum

Narrado por Erin Yuen

avaliações:
4/5 (7 avaliações)
Comprimento:
6 horas
Lançado em:
Feb 12, 2019
ISBN:
9781974935574
Formato:
Audiolivro

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Descrição

A young munchkin boy named Ojo embarks on a quest to save his grandfather who has been petrified by a magician. On his quest, he is joined by a life-sized patchwork doll named Scraps. Along the way, he encounters Dorothy, the Scarecrow, and the Tin Man. The seventh in the Oz books series, this novel was adapted into a 1914 silent film of the same name produced by L. Frank Baum’s Oz Film Manufacturing Company.

Lançado em:
Feb 12, 2019
ISBN:
9781974935574
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919) was an American author of children’s literature and pioneer of fantasy fiction. He demonstrated an active imagination and a skill for writing from a young age, and was encouraged by his father who bought him the printing press with which he began to publish several journals. Although he had a lifelong passion for theater, Baum found success with his novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900), a self-described “modernized fairy tale” that led to thirteen sequels, inspired several stage and radio adaptations, and eventually, in 1939, was immortalized in the classic film starring Judy Garland.

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Avaliações de leitores

  • (3/5)
    When Ojo the Unlucky accidentally turns his Uncle to stone he must travel throughout the land of Oz to collect the items to restore Unk Nunky to his old self.This book was originally published in 1913 and it seems very quaint in the 21st century. Although there is a vague through-line, the book is not terribly plot-driven. It is more a series of vignettes to show off Baum's imagination. Each chapter could almost stand alone, especially since the characters explain why they are on their journey every time they meet someone new. This amounts to just about every other chapter since they cover a great deal of ground and meet a large number of creatures. The book is charming, but can be difficult to get into. It is more about exploring Oz than exploring the people there.It would be a good book for elementary schools and public library youth collections, but it is not as special as The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.
  • (4/5)
    Ojo and the Patchwork girl travel to save Ojo's Uncle. I liked the Patchwork Girl and the Scarecrow's reaction to her.Their adventures were enjoyable.But the ending made Ojo's hard work rather pointless.
  • (4/5)
    It was apparent in the previous Oz book of the series that Baum had gotten to a place where he no longer wanted to tell stories about the land of Oz, so he tried to end the series, but he kept getting letters requesting further stories. The result of these numerous requests is that two years after "The Emerald City of Oz" Baum created this new book. This book feels far superior to the previous work only because it appears Baum has gotten to a peaceful place with telling these fantastical stories. He is able to create characters again that are out of this world, but have a heart, which he was only somewhat able to do in the most recent volumes before this to some success.

    The only gripe about this book is that it is apparent that Baum does not have a love for music. In the previous volume there was a character that played music and he was ridiculed heavily and in this one a phonograph comes to life that is greatly hated by all that hear it. It feels again that Baum said that certain things do not deserve to be alive because they are so vastly different, which does not sit well with me in the slightest.

    Baum still even when being rude towards different people is able to create a wonderful adventure story where you are anticipating how you will get to the conclusion. The Patchwork Girl of Oz does not disappoint in this respect. You will wonder how they are ever going to get to the end of the book and how everything will be wrapped up in a nice ribbon for this is a children book and it must be wrapped in that ribbon.

    I was really taken in with his characterization of Scraps the Patchwork Girl of Oz in this particular story. At times she is described as crazy as she suddenly bursts into a rhyme, but this is one of his stronger characters. She is well-developed and thought-out. I am hoping that she appears in a few of the books that are in the rest of the series because she is one of Baum's better designs.
  • (3/5)
    Ojo the Unlucky, a Munchkin boy raised in isolation in the Blue Forest by his taciturn Unc Nunkie, finds himself setting out on a quest through the wider world of Oz in this seventh entry in L. Frank Baum's series about that magical country. After his beloved uncle is petrified at the home of the Crooked Magician - the creator of the Powder of Life, first introduced in The Marvelous Land of Oz - Ojo, in the company of Scraps the Patchwork Girl and Bungle the Glass Cat, embarks on a mission to track down the ingredients necessary for the antidote to this magical mishap. But where will he find a six-leaved clover, the left wing of a yellow butterfly, a gill of water from a dark well, three hairs from a Woozy's tail, and a drop of oil from a man's body? And how will the other residents of Oz that he encounters - the Shaggy Man, the Scarecrow, Princess Dorothy, Princess Ozma, and the Tin Woodman - react to his quest...?Although by no means a favorite, when it comes to Baum's Oz books - that honor goes to the first, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and to the third, Ozma of Oz - I have always enjoyed The Patchwork Girl of Oz, finding both Ojo and Scraps engaging characters, in their separate ways. I suppose that as a girl I identified with Ojo's rebellious resentment, in the matter of the six-leaved clover - not understanding the purpose of the law against picking it, he thought it grossly unfair - while I enjoyed Scraps' thoroughly amoral joie de vie. I imagine that readers of the time, horrified at the prospect of no more Oz books - in the previous installment, The Emerald City of Oz, Baum declared that Ozma had made her kingdom invisible to the outside world, and that there would be no more stories from Oz - were overjoyed at this return to the beloved world of fairy and magic. As for me, rereading this as an adult, I'm struck by the negative depiction of cats - Bungle here, and Eureka in Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz- so far in the series. I wonder if perhaps Baum disliked them...?
  • (4/5)
    The Patchwork Girl of Oz🍒🍒🍒🍒
    Land of Oz # 7
    By Baum
    1913

    This book introduces us to Ojo, The Unlucky, a munchkin boy, who sets out on a quest to save his Uncle, Unc Nunkie from starvation, and begins by visiting old friend Dr. Pipt. Dr. Pipt demonstrated his 'Powder of Life' which animates any object it touches with magic words. He invented this powder for his wife, Margolette, to bring a patchwork doll to life to be her slave. However, another of Dr. Pipts inventions, the Liquid of Petrifacation, has spilled on his wife and him turning them to marble. The only way to save his uncle is to find an antidote for the Liquid of Petrification. He needs to find 5 specific ingredients for the antidote.

    Ojos searches through Oz, for these 5 ingredients: 1. 3 hairs from the tip of a Woozy tail. 2. A gill ( quarter pint) of water from a dark well. 3. A drop of oil from a live human body. 4. A 6 leaf clover. 5. The left wing of a yellow butterfly
    Ojo has collected all but the left wing because Yellow butterfly's only live in the Country of Winkie, where the Tin Man is emperor and he will not allow any living thing to die, even to save another. So they return to Emerald City and enlist the help of the Wizard of Oz. The wizard grants his wish and then renamed him Ojo The Lucky.

    An interesting note: Baum wrote an additional chapter, titled 'The Garden of Meats'. It deals with a race of vegetable people, called Mangaboos. These vegetable people grew
    "meat people" for food, the plants main feature were heads of human children. Baum was asked to not include the chapter by his editors, and it has been deleted and never found, except in reference.

    I love this series....the wacky characters and plots. This is probably one of the best in the series so far......
  • (5/5)
    I was a fan with the Oz series growing up, and it's great to know I'm still a fan as an adult! I love revisiting these books, they truly are timeless!
  • (4/5)
    After the The Emerald City of Oz, Baum was planning on ending the Oz series. Public demand and financial reasons prompted him to continue the books with The Patchwork Girl of Oz. Knowing that it wouldn’t be surprising if the story felt forced, but that’s not the case. Ojo and his uncle, Unk Nunkie are Munchkins that live in the land of Oz. While visiting their magician friend, Dr. Pipt, they see him use the Powder of Life to bring a patchwork girl to life. She’s originally created to help the Doctor’s wife clean their home, but she’s accidently given too much cleverness. The feisty girl often speaks in rhyme and stands up for her friends without thinking of the consequences. This story reunites readers with all their old favorites. Ozma, Dorothy and the Tin Woodman are all back and the Scarecrow is particularly smitten with the Patchwork Girl. The story follows Ojo as he embarks on a crusade to gather some strange items to help Dr. Pipt save his wife. Also, there’s a funny glass cat in this story that reminded me a bit of Dorothy’s bossy hen. The original illustrations are one of my favorite elements of the books and this installment is just wonderful. BOTTOM LINE: A great addition to the series, this book combines fan favorites with new characters in an excellent way.