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Each Kindness

Each Kindness

Escrito por Jacqueline Woodson

Narrado por Nikki M. James


Each Kindness

Escrito por Jacqueline Woodson

Narrado por Nikki M. James

avaliações:
4.5/5 (92 avaliações)
Comprimento:
8 minutos
Lançado em:
Mar 1, 2014
ISBN:
9780545748377
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

Chloe and her friends shun the new girl, Maya, who eventually stops coming to school. When Chloe's teacher gives a lesson about how even small acts of kindness can change the world, Chloe realizes how much better it could have been if she'd shown a little kindness toward Maya. With its powerful anti-bullying message and striking art, this book will resonate with readers long after they've put it down.
Lançado em:
Mar 1, 2014
ISBN:
9780545748377
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Jacqueline Woodson is the 2014 National Book Award Winner for her New York Times bestselling memoir Brown Girl Dreaming, which was also a recipient of the Coretta Scott King Award, a Newbery Honor Award, the NAACP Image Award, and the Sibert Honor Award. She is also the author of New York Times bestselling novel Another Brooklyn (Harper/Amistad), which was a 2016 National Book Award Finalist and Woodson’s first adult novel in twenty years. In 2015, Woodson was named Young People’s Poet Laureate by the Poetry Foundation. She is the author of more than two dozen award-winning books for young adults, middle graders, and children; among her many accolades, she is a four-time Newbery Honor winner, a three-time National Book Award finalist, and a two-time Coretta Scott King Award winner. http://www.jacquelinewoodson.com/

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4.5
92 avaliações / 84 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    When Maya moves to school, she is teased and ignored by her peers due to her living in poverty. Chloe, our narrator, is also guilty of this behavior. The bullying continues until Maya moves school. After being taught about kindness in class, Chloe begins to feel guilty and wants the opportunity to be kind to Maya, but it is too late. I think Woodson's choice to make the bully the narrator was an important decision, because it teaches children that unkind people can learn from their mistakes.
  • (4/5)
    This story is about a young girl who is not nice to the new girl at school named Maya when she came to sit by her. The young girl did not talk to Maya because she was "different" than her, as in, she wore second-hand clothing. One day Maya did not come to school and the teacher gave a lesson on kindness which really struct home with the young girl. It made her realize what she did was wrong, however, the young girl never got to apologize because Maya and her family moved away. The young girl never got a chance to apologize to her and now regrets her actions. This book teaches a students a very valuable lesson, that your words have impact on others around you and sometimes you do not get the chance to get them back. It allows readers to really reflect on their actions and think about how it can effect others.
  • (4/5)
    really powerful book about the choices we make to be kind (or not) to those around us. Because the lone student moves before the main character has a chance to learn her lesson and be kind, there is also a great lesson in not WAITING to do the right thing. I would love to use this in class to discuss classroom culture and community.
  • (5/5)
    This is a good book to teach children to be kind to others always. Maya moves into a new school and tries to be friends with Chloe. But Chloe worries to much about what other kids will think. She does not follow her heart and befriend Maya. One day Chloe decides that she is going to forget what the other kids say and like Maya. But it is too late, Maya has moved again. Chloe can never be her friend. She is sad.
  • (5/5)
    The pieces that Jacqueline Woodson and E.B. Lewis create collaboratively, are magical. This book has such beautiful, realistic illustrations and designs to accompany the events taking place throughout the story. Lewis' illustrations, one of my favorite things about this book, show how much effort was put into creating them, and they work beautifully to paint the picture and really allow the reader to visualize everything that Woodson writes. I love this book for a few other reasons— one being that it is extremely relatable. I am confident that students who read this will be able to feel a connection to Maya, or Chloe and her friends. I also love the multiple messages that comes through with the story. Woodson and Lewis have worked together to show first show children that we should be grateful for the things that we have and not take them for granted. Maya, the new student at school, wears a lot of old, "raggedy" clothes, plays with old toys, and has things that may have been passed down to her or have been used. Chloe and her friends, use this information against Maya, rejecting her anytime Maya wants to play with them. The book teaches students not to judge one another or be mean to people that just want to find a friend. We never know how much our mean words or actions can affect another person, and Chloe eventually sees that for herself. In life, we often take people or things for granted while we have them and when they're gone, we tend to then realize that we once had a really good thing, and that message is so perfectly executed through Woodson and Lewis' work. At the end of the book, Chloe realizes that she, in fact, really wanted to be Maya's friend and to play with her and to get to know her. However, she is never able to say these words to Maya because she never returned to school. The book ends so abruptly in that way, showing us that Chloe was essentially too late and it just feels so real. Another thing I love about this book is how versatile it is in its ability to share its messages and lessons with a range of students. Any child, even a child in Kindergarten, can understand not to judge others based on what we see, but to consider them as an individual who we should take the time to get to know. That message can be so simple, and it can also be more elaborate and complex, for older children to analyze. Children of all ages and in all grades (even adults) can learn something valuable from this book and I love that. I would recommend this book to anyone that I meet— it is worth the read.
  • (5/5)
    Poignant story of an African American girl, Chloe, who is not kind to the new student, Maya, when she arrives at school. Chloe and her friends ignore Maya and make fun of her used clothes over the course of many months. Maya isn't at school one day and although Chloe wishes she would have been kinder, she cannot do anything to make it up to Maya. Students are surprised with a such a sad ending. They are used to "happy" endings where the bully stops his behavior and the children are friends again. This story is so much better because it has more to talk about - friendship, kindness, bullying,teasing, regret, change.
  • (4/5)
    This is a very touching and powerful story that I enjoyed very much. One reason I enjoyed this book was because of the perspective in which it was written. Woodson, the author of the story, writes it from the perspective of the bully rather then from the victim This allows the reader to see the plot from a different point of view, which is not typical in books that address the issue of bullying. Another reason I enjoyed this book was because of the illustrations and the mood they conveyed. For example, after Maya moves away, the bully sits at the pond with her head down in regret that she was mean to Maya and did not ever have a chance to say something nice to her. The illustration clearly depicts this emotion by the body language and expression on the girl's face. The big idea of the story is to always show kindness to everyone because you may not get the chance to do so again.
  • (4/5)
    This story is about a little girl named Mya, who just moved into town and is new at school. she is being picked on by the other kids for wearing second hand clothes. After multiple attempts to play with the others, Mya begins to play by herself. One day, Mya stops coming to school. The teacher decides to do a lesson on kindness. The lesson made one of the girls, who had once picked on her realize how wrong she was. She then wanted Mya to come to school so she could play with her. The sad part was she never seen Mya again! This is a great story to read to children. This book helps children to understand you may not get another chance to be nice. I really enjoyed reading this book.
  • (5/5)
    What a wonderful book and a teaching moment for all children! Maya, a new student, comes to a new school. She is obviously poorer than her classmates, and therefore they shun her. Her teacher notices this, and takes the time to teach the students a lesson about how to be nice to others. This leads Chloe, the main character, to wonder about opportunities lost in being nice to Maya once Chloe learns that Maya won't be returning to their school.
  • (5/5)
    Maya is the new girl, who nobody likes at school. She is different and wears old clothes. No matter how bad she is treated, she is always smiling and nice. After doing a lesson in class, one girl realizes that she has been ugly to Maya. The little girl wants to go to school to tell Maya something nice the next day. The problem is Maya is gone, she moved again. The little girl is now even more upset that she never had a nice thing to say to Maya. I would use this book in my class to discuss bullying. I would start by asking the students to say something negative. Every time they did I would make a fold in a paper heart. Then I would tell the students to say something nice. Each time they did I would unfold the heart. When it was all the way unfolded I would ask the students what they notice about the heart. Hopefully one student will mention the wrinkles. The lesson would be that saying ugly things leave a mark forever. Apologizes do not erase the hurt.
  • (5/5)
    This book was SAD. I understand and agree with the moral of the story - acts of kindness make a difference - but this book just left me heartbroken. It's so sad because it is so true. I would have to think about reading this to my students.
  • (5/5)
    I thought this was a wonderful book. I first liked this book because of the illustrations. The illustrations went over the gutter, which I thought enhanced the story. The illustrations are very realistic containing much detail. They also convey mood/emotion. For example, the boy who was the narrator of the story was filled with sadness and was sitting at a pond with his head down, throwing rocks in the pond because he wished he could go back and say all these things to Maya to make her not leave school. The second reason why I liked the book was because it was written using the narrator’s inner monologue about Maya. For example he said, “Maya was wearing a pretty dress and fancy shoes, but it looked like they belonged to someone before her.” It was interesting to see how he perceived Maya. The main message of the book was to show kindness to everyone. That you may not get another chance to be nice; make the most out of everyday.
  • (5/5)
    This is yet another story written by who I may now consider my favorite author, Jaqueline Woodson. This story specifically has an enchanting plot which will touch each reader’s heart, includes a mass of dialogue to guide the story along with an inner monologue of the main character. First and foremost, a reader will notice that the story is driven by the dialogue between the main character and a new student, Maya, who the main character continually bullies. Unlike many stories before it, Woodson chose to write the story from the bully’s point of view rather than the victim. This gives her reader the chance to see the plot from a number of points of view. The plot is also driven by the main character’s inner monologues on the reasoning behind her bullying and then eventual understanding of what she did wrong. Those monologues and dialogues help the author create a deep meaningful plot, where a child bullies another without considering the side effects of her actions. This plot easily conveys Woodson’s message that we should all be kind, while we still have the chance to share that kindness.
  • (4/5)
    Each Kindness is the story of a little girl who comes to a new school and is never accepted into a friend circle. By the time the teacher had an anti-bullying activity with her class, the main character can never reach out to the bullied little girl to fix what was damaged, because she is gone for an unknown reason. Each Kindness should be read to all classrooms of all ages to get the message across that words hurt, and that it may be too late to give a nice word to somebody who needs it.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books I have read this semester so far. I am planning on buying this book and share it with my kids and my future students. It's a must have!! Jacqueline Woodson develops an amazing, heartwarming story about a girl who has a hard time accepting a new friend in her life. Their teacher teaches them about kindness and how we each one matters. The new girl moves away before Cloe has the opportunity to show her some kindness. She is filled with regret and a life lesson that she will never be able to forget. Amazing illustrations as well.
  • (5/5)
    This book teaches a great lesson of kindness that each and every teacher should promote in a classroom. This is a first person narrative story; Chloe is the antagonist who tells the story through her eyes. Maya is a outgoing new girl in Chloe's class. When Chloe decides to ignore and bully Maya, the other girls follow. This leaves Maya all alone and forces her to play on her own. She does not give us trying to make friends until Chloe and her posse refuse to talk to her. When their teacher indirectly promotes kindness in the classroom Chloe notices she has not been so nice to Maya. She begins to feel remorseful but it is too late. Maya has moved away and is not coming back. Chloe must soak in her lack of kindness and begins to feel regretful of her behaviors toward Maya. This is great book with a great lesson of kindness. Students need to be aware of other's feelings and treat every classmate is a nice manner. They may never get the chance, just like Chloe.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a little girl who does show kindness. There is a new girl in her school. She could have been nice to the girl and let her hang out with her and her friends. Instead, she ignored her and never ever smiled back. She was very mean to the girl. In class the teacher was showing an example of how kindness worked. This man the girl understand how mean she was really being. She told her self that she was going to change. But the girl never came back to school. She could never smile back at the girl. The moral of the story is that the girl was the only one hurt by her own actions. The new girl was used to being the new girl. She was never bothered by the girl not smiling back or playing with her. She had adapted and understood she wouldn't be in the school very long. The other girl had to live with the guilt of the pain she had thought she caused to the new girl. She never did get to apologize. She has to live with the guilt forever.
  • (5/5)
    Maya is a new student and no one wants to play with her. They said she looks like she has on old wore down clothes and they judge her. She has on spring clothes during the winter. Chloe and her friends ignore Maya when she tries to play with them. Before long, the teacher notices what's going on in the classroom. She tries to teach them that an act of kindness can be just what someone needs. That day Maya doesn't show up for class. Chloe feels terribly bad. Maya had moved away. I would implement this book in all classes to teach kids not to be mean to others.
  • (2/5)
    This was a sweet book with beautiful illustrations. The sad ending demonstrates the importance of acceptance and reminds young readers of the importance of being a friend.
  • (5/5)
    Terrific, moving story and beautiful illustrations. I wonder how it will be received by lower elementary students? I'm going to read it when we discuss bullying.
  • (5/5)
    This book could be used to teach students about having kindness towards each other. The book ends on a sad note but it still has teachable moments. The story is about a new girl in school (Mya). She wears second hand cloths and plays with old toys. The girls in her class always leave her out and make fun of her. One day the teacher demonstrates how kindness works. She drops a small pebble into a bowl of water and tells the class that that it was kindness does. A small kind jester ripples out into the world and makes it a better place. One of the girls in class, Chloe, starts to think about all the times she could have been nice and kind to Mya. It's too late for Chloe though because Mya moved away.
  • (3/5)
    The setting of this book is at school and took place during the winter. Maya was a new student at her school and on the first day many of the other students judged her. Maya tries to become friends with girls at the new school. The other girls bullied her and nicknamed her "never new." The teacher uses ripples from throwing a stone in the water to demonstrate how peoples actions affect others. Maya ends up moving away and left the school. Chloe, one of the girls she tried to be friends with, regrets not talking to Maya when she had the chance. I recommend this book to k-5 and for any students new to a school.
  • (5/5)
    Doesn't have a happy ending that wraps up the story. Encourages students to analyze why students were rude or what could have changed etc.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed reading Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson. One reason I liked this book was because it was relatable. Most everyone has been mean to someone before and then regretted it later on. I was unkind to someone before and wished I could have taken that back but I couldn’t and I felt just like Chloe. In this story you really got to see how mean Chloe was to the new girl, Maya, for no reason. The girls wouldn’t let Maya play with them, then regretted it when she was gone. It shows how important it is to be kind to others. I also really liked in the book how it never told you if Maya was homeless or what she was dealing with. The text and illustrations pointed out her dirty or hand-down clothes but besides that Maya’s background was a mystery and I thought that played really well into the story. I also liked the ending because Maya was gone and Chloe never got to apologize, I thought that was very powerful because it showed that it really was too late and she should have been kind in the first place. I also liked how the illustrations of the girls were from different ethnic backgrounds, it shows that anyone can be struggling socioeconomically, not just a certain race. The message of the story is pretty simple, be kind to all people. Kindness makes the world a better place. I think this book is good because everyone needs to be reminded of that message, not just children.
  • (5/5)
    A sad, but great book to help kids see the impact of their actions. I think this is a book that many people will be able to relate to and will make people want to be kinder.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! I think it's a perfect book to read on the first day of school. Every child can relate to this book, whether being a new student or a new friend to someone. Showing kindness to others is such an important topic to discus with children. What better day to read a book about acceptance than on the first day of school?
  • (5/5)
    When a new girl, Maya, comes to school, Chloe and her friends take one look at her ragged clothes and distance themselves from her. When Maya smiles, Chloe doesn't smile back. When Maya reaches out to the girls and suggests games, they turn away. The teacher notes their lack of kindness and has the students drop a stone in water to watch the ripples that flow out - just as a kind act would yield ripples. Devastated by how she's acted, Chloe can think of nothing kind that she has done.. The ending of the story, not a happy one, is unusual in a children's book, and it's perfect, painting the realistic picture of the way the world sometimes really is. We don't always do the right thing, and we're left with regrets when we don't.
  • (5/5)
    This book took a darker turn for me than most of my classmates. I assumed that the bullying led to suicide and not just "moving away", and I do feel as though this is something that kids should be exposed to, even at an early age. It does happen and it happens far too often, even in young children. And one of the main reasons for it is bullying. The book really shows shows children how their actions do affect others and how important it is to just be at least civil, but friendly is best.
  • (5/5)
    Maya, a new student, is permanently bullied by her classmates because of her old clothes and toys. One day she is not coming back to school anymore and the teacher teaches the other students a lesson about generosity, kindness, and that each student can help somebody else by being nice. When Chloe sees Maya in the park that afternoon, she apologizes and they become good friends.A very recommendable book about how big the issue of classism in the early childhood age can already be.
  • (5/5)
    This is a cautionary tale, without the usual happy ending many adults expect in a children's book with a message. The narrator is an elementary-school-age girl who is unwilling to risk the teasing of her friends by befriending a new girl who is seated next to her in her class. The school seems to be multicultural and the new girl, Maya, is not welcomed because she seems to be poor; the problem is not the more expected racial, religious, or ethnic prejudice, but the more likely just being different. Maya is not in school on the day that the teacher asks each student to say something kind that he or she has done and then put a small stone into a jar to see its ripples; the action is meant to show how our deeds, however small, affect the world. The narrator cannot think of any act of kindness that she has ever done, only that if Maya were still there, she would smile at her. But Maya has moved away and the narrator can only regret her missed opportunity.This story could be a good starting point for discussing guilt and regret and forgiveness and the lack thereof, and the danger of putting off intended good deeds. Also ignoring your conscience in order to fit in with your friends, that courage can be as simple as a smile, and being unkind to one person can blind you to anything good that you have done. That last bit is my attempt to explain why the narrator cannot think of any act of kindness.